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Review of Anova, Sansaire and Nomiku

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Serious Eats reviews Anova, Sansaire, and Nomiku circulators.....

http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/12/sous-vide-circulator-review-sansaire-nomiku-anova.html

Thanks for posting this link. I was surprised by two things:

A) rating them on speed to reach temperature as this is really easily addressed by starting with hotter water and hence pretty minor

And

B) not making a much bigger issue about the minimal leeway between min and max water level on the Nomiku which is major.

I can't say much about the Sansaire as I don't own one but to me the water level leeway on the Anova makes me reach for it over the Nomiku for any lengthy cooking times, i.e. over 2 hours. Just my 2 cents.

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I still don't know why the Polyscience lower priced units were excluded from the comparison.

but on the whole, the Anova seems to be the winner.

especially when one factours in both the lawsuit and the current unavailability of the Sansaire.

What did NOT emerge in the review was a compelling reason to wait to buy it.

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Yeah, at $199 it won't go much lower and beats the price of used lab circulators on eBay. Only DIY is cheaper.

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Hello,

I've just joined this forum that I discovered this morning, and that thread convinced me to buy an ANOVA unit, I've just placed my order.

So I look forward to posting my comments here.

Cheers to everyone.

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especially when one factours in both the lawsuit and the current unavailability of the Sansaire.

what is the lawsuit about?

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Polyscience says Sansaire infringes on its patents.

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Are there any other articles that compare the Anova and Sansaire?  I am intending to buy one or the other when they're available.

While the serious eats article is very useful, I'd like to hear more comments from people who've tested them side-by-side.  Also, as someone living in Australia, I'd like to compare the shipping costs too.

 

I was going to buy the Anova because it comes in red, but it looks like they've sold out of red (or are international versions black only?)  Then my wife said she thought the Sansaire looked better, so I went to buy the Sansaire but they're sold out, and the website has no information about international shipping costs.

 

So while I'm waiting for the Sansaires and the red Anovas to come back in stock, are there any other comments or reviews on them both?

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I own the Anova and have used the Sansaire. My opinion: Anova hands down. The clip on the back attaches tightly to thicker coolers (my favorite sous vide vessel, retains heat without the hassle of MacGyvering a cambro) and like the review said you can move the cooler with the Anova attached at BBQs without concern it's going to tilt or fall in. I like that Anova is an established company, their customer feedback is top notch, that and they're not dealing with Polyscience lawsuits. One thing that I think that's often overlooked is the adjustable circulator. You can point the jet of water in any direction. This can be used to keep bags submerged at bottom, I've used this to make chicken noodles from Chefsteps. Polyscience has this capability on their circulators as well, Sansaire does not. I like that you can take off the protecting cage and clean it, it's stainless steel as opposed to the Sansaire so I feel more safe that if falls it may leave a dent rather than cracking the whole housing. 

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What did NOT emerge in the review was a compelling reason to wait to buy it.

 

The only reason I can think of is the hints they're dropping of a an even better version.

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I own the Anova and have used the Sansaire. My opinion: Anova hands down. The clip on the back attaches tightly to thicker coolers (my favorite sous vide vessel, retains heat without the hassle of MacGyvering a cambro) and like the review said you can move the cooler with the Anova attached at BBQs without concern it's going to tilt or fall in. I like that Anova is an established company, their customer feedback is top notch, that and they're not dealing with Polyscience lawsuits. One thing that I think that's often overlooked is the adjustable circulator. You can point the jet of water in any direction. This can be used to keep bags submerged at bottom, I've used this to make chicken noodles from Chefsteps. Polyscience has this capability on their circulators as well, Sansaire does not. I like that you can take off the protecting cage and clean it, it's stainless steel as opposed to the Sansaire so I feel more safe that if falls it may leave a dent rather than cracking the whole housing. 

 

that sums it up nicely

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Thanks Beusho for your reply, just what I was after.

To answer some of my own questions, the international version of the Anova is only available in black. So no red for me. And the shipping costs for both are the same = $80US each.

I'm tempted to buy the Anova now, but there's the odd rumour of a mkII coming soon so I'm tempted to wait a bit longer...

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contact them and ask!

 

but it's not like you'd be disappointed in the current model

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but it's not like you'd be disappointed in the current model

 

Most unlikely!

 

ChrisZ, if you haven't already: have a look at the Anova topic.  Jeff from the company has recently asked about improvements/changes we'd like to see in the hypothetical (or not) MkII.

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