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Darienne

I will never again . . . (Part 4)

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...try to get through a bread recipe without changing the batteries in the kitchen scale if it starts acting wonky. The Hawaiian rolls bear only a slim resemblance to what they're supposed to look and taste like.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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Hi, it's me again.

 

This evening I acquired a couple of kilos of Parmigiano Reggiano.  It had been shipped with an ice pack but after customs and agricultural inspection got through with it the package arrived a little warm.  So my first priority was to fit the cheese in the refrigerator.  No trivial task.

 

I emptied out the middle shelf of the refrigerator onto kitchen surfaces.  What was taking all the space?  I shall never again hoard years (decades?) of unused Parmesan rinds.  Wrapped in little bags, 605 grams total.  (Which does not count the rinds I'm still working on.)

 

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11 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Hi, it's me again.

 

This evening I acquired a couple of kilos of Parmigiano Reggiano.  It had been shipped with an ice pack but after customs and agricultural inspection got through with it the package arrived a little warm.  So my first priority was to fit the cheese in the refrigerator.  No trivial task.

 

I emptied out the middle shelf of the refrigerator onto kitchen surfaces.  What was taking all the space?  I shall never again hoard years (decades?) of unused Parmesan rinds.  Wrapped in little bags, 605 grams total.  (Which does not count the rinds I'm still working on.)

 

Does anyone actually use leftover rinds.  I have my own little collection...


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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9 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Wrapped in little bags, 605 grams total.  (Which does not count the rinds I'm still working on.)

Make Parmesan broth.

 

 That’s one recipe but there are many others.

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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3 minutes ago, Darienne said:

Does anyone actually use leftover rinds.  I have my own little collection...

 

Apparently I don't.

 

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16 minutes ago, Darienne said:

 

I have my own little collection...

 

Me too.

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2 hours ago, Darienne said:

Does anyone actually use leftover rinds.  I have my own little collection...

I do. But being just one person I can only use so many. They will improve many, many soups. Just toss a few in the soup pot.  Think umami. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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13 hours ago, Darienne said:

Does anyone actually use leftover rinds.  I have my own little collection...

 

I toss mine into risotto when I add the rice at the beginning and fish them out before serving. They add a nice flavor to the finished risotto. I also put them into slow cooked pasta sauces.

 

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14 hours ago, Anna N said:

I do. But being just one person I can only use so many. They will improve many, many soups. Just toss a few in the soup pot.  Think umami. 

Rachael Ray, on her syndicated cooking/talk show, swears by the rinds. She adds them to every soup or broth she makes on the the show.


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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27 minutes ago, Toliver said:

Rachael Ray, on her syndicated cooking/talk show, swears by the rinds. She adds them to every soup or broth she makes on the the show.

They certainly bring something extra to many soups and broths.   When my husband was alive I would throw them in to the soup and he would beg me not to take them out before serving.  Provided we did not have company he would fish them out and scrape them across his teeth to get the very last bit of cheese from the rind.  Takes all kinds.

 

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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On 6/1/2018 at 10:10 AM, Darienne said:

Does anyone actually use leftover rinds.  I have my own little collection...

 

I keep them until they turn moldy then throw them out.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I didn't even know rinds could turn moldy.  I better check, the ones in my fridge have been there for years.  

 

When I remember, I throw them in with the polenta.

 

I'm going to try broth though, then I can boil it down and freeze it.  

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Line my bread baking pan with baking paper inserted the wrong way up. I now have an otherwise beautifully baked loaf, with paper welded to its base and sides.

 

In my defence, this was a new batch of baking paper which is side specific. The last lot I used was non-welding either side.

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

Line my bread baking pan with baking paper inserted the wrong way up. I now have an otherwise beautifully baked loaf, with paper welded to its base and sides.

 

In my defence, this was a new batch of baking paper which is side specific. The last lot I used was non-welding either side.

Good heavens.  I didn't even know there was side specific baking paper.  You won't do that one again....

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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3 minutes ago, Darienne said:

Good heavens.  I didn't even know there was side specific baking paper.

 

Neither did I. 

During the post mortem, I read the blurb on the box and it doesn't mention it.

 

But my bread isn't totally destroyed. I just have to cut of the crusts as if  I am some tooth-less ancient.

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

Line my bread baking pan with baking paper inserted the wrong way up. I now have an otherwise beautifully baked loaf, with paper welded to its base and sides.

 

In my defence, this was a new batch of baking paper which is side specific. The last lot I used was non-welding either side.

Wow. That is new to me. The only liner that I use in the kitchen that is side specific is nonstick aluminum foil. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Basically regular foil, but one side is treated with (I believe) silicone, making it a sort of metallic parchment. Seems to work, though I've only used it a couple of times.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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15 minutes ago, chromedome said:

Basically regular foil, but one side is treated with (I believe) silicone, making it a sort of metallic parchment. Seems to work, though I've only used it a couple of times.

 Don’t use it often but like Ex-Lax it needs to be in the house.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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55 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Wow! I never heard of that either!

 

I use it all the time.

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