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liuzhou

Radish

13 posts in this topic

My local supermarket had radishes yesterday. We hardly ever get them here, so on impulse I bought some. Normally I'd just eat them with S+P or use in a salad, but they are slightly past their their best. Not as crisp as I would have liked.

radishes (1).jpg

They have to be used quickly. Any suggestions? Thanks.

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Carve into flowers, use 'em to decorate a pate.

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This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

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Same idea as Shelby - I like to grill them. Too bad you don't have the greens. Grilling/roasting the greens for so few minutes and adding to the root makes a fantastic dish.

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I made braised radishes for T-Day. Most people hadn't had them before and really liked them. Put in pan with just a little water and some butter--whatever seasoning you like. Cover and cook for a bit, then take lid off and let water evaporate, so they are just glazed with the butter. I put them around the turkey platter and they are so pretty and just delicious.

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Deb

Liberty, MO

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Soak them on cold water (whole) for

A couple of hours, it will bring back some texture

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I am regularly vexed by the frequent presence of radishes in my weekly CSA box.  There are lovely French breakfast radishes, multicolored Easter radishes and slender white icicle radishes.  All are delightfully fresh, with lively, peppery greens and I enjoy a few in salads, with bread and butter, etc.  but more often than not, they sink to the bottom of the vegetable drawer until they are tossed and replaced by a fresher radish contingent.  

The other day, I modified my usual recipe for turnip soup from Deborah Madison's Greens Cookbook and made this pretty radish and leek soup garnished with a juilenne of radish leaves and slivered fresh radishes:

radish soup.jpg

I trimmed 3 bunches of radishes (reserving the greens from the freshest bunch for the garnish, along with 3 of the nicest looking radishes), soaked them in cool water, scrubbed them well with a brush to remove any dirt and halved the bigger ones.  I had about 1.25 lbs after trimming. I also trimmed, washed and thinly sliced 2 leeks.

I melted 3 tablespoons of butter in a pot with 1/2 cup water. Added the leeks, radishes, a few branches of fresh thyme, and 1/2 teaspoon salt. I stewed them, covered, over medium-low heat for 5 minutes, and then added a can of evaporated milk and about 2 cups of low fat milk. That gets heated gently and cooked until the radishes are completely tender.

I puréed the soup my Blendtec and seasoned with freshly ground pepper.  At this point, the soup was tasty, but didn't look any different from other cream soups so I used a bit of cooked beet to add some color and garnished the bowls with finely chopped radish greens and fresh radish.  

If I had 3 very fresh bunches of radishes (rather than one fresh, one week old and one even older), I might have followed the original turnip soup recipe, cooked the greens and added them to the soup, but I would have missed the contrast the fresh greens bring here.  

No doubt the radishes that Liuzhou asked about in this thread are long gone and I'm sure this isn't the sort of dish one would choose for a few fresh radishes, but I thought I'd post this in a thread where others seeking radish recipes might find it.  I know I'm looking forward to making it again when the radishes pile up in the vegetable drawer, particularly in cooler weather.

radish soup.jpg

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I hope that radish soup tasted as good as it looks, it looks wonderful!


I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

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Thank you, MSRadell!  It was very tasty indeed. The strongest flavor came from the leeks, the cooked radishes added a sweet earthiness and the crisp fresh radish garnish was a nice contrast.  It certainly didn't scream, "RADISH!" although I might have gone a little too Pepto-Bismol :laugh: with the pink color from the beet juice and would probably dial that back a bit next time!


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)

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The colour is beautiful - and so different. Valentine's Day is coming - would be a great starter. Also appropriate for Easter.

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I like a recipe from Lydia B. for sauteed radishes with their greens. The green are actually more nutritious than the root part.

 

http://www.lidiasitaly.com/recipes/detail/781

 

It calls for for only a few ingredients:

 

about 16 cleaned radishes with their greens

2 T. olive oil

4 garlic cloves smashed

1/4 c. chicken stock or water

salt

black pepper

 

You heat the olive oil in a skillet, toss in and toast the garlic for about two minutes, add the radishes and chicken stock, and cover the pan. Cook about 4 minutes, then remove cover to evaporate liquid. Season to taste.

 

I never waste beet greens either. I like them better than chard, and I love chard.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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