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Spring

Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 2)

249 posts in this topic

I made a small batch of the mango ganache yesterday. I used canned mango puree from the Indian store - it's the only one I can find in small quantities. I reduced the puree by half, as the recipe calls for. The ganache tasted odd, I thought - somewhat metallic or bitter, maybe, and it didn't improve when coated with dark chocolate. Could it be because of the quality of the puree? Where do you get your mango puree? Anything I should be watching out for when reducing the stuff?

The metallic flavour may simply be present because the puree was tinned; some things pick up metallic notes like crazy, especially if they're acidic.


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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I either use Goya Mango Puree (in the freezer case of many grocery stores) or order it from L'Epicerie (they have a wide variety of purees).

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Thanks Mjx and Curls. I was hoping the tinned puree would work because the Indian mangoes taste so good when fresh. But I shall look for the frozen Goya puree. I'm reluctant to shell out the money for the L'epicerie ones because I'm afraid they'll go bad before I use it all up. How long would they keep?

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The frozen fruit purees should be good for about a year in the freezer. Just remove what you need, defrost that, seal the container well and keep the remainder frozen.

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The frozen fruit purees should be good for about a year in the freezer. Just remove what you need, defrost that, seal the container well and keep the remainder frozen.

I didn't realize the L'epicerie purees would keep that long. That would definitely make them worth buying. Now if I could just figure out a way to fit it all into my freezer :unsure:

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I made the PBJs this weekend.

I had a bit of trouble with the jelly layer because for some reason the temperature rose rather erratically (up to 214, then down to 204, then up and down for over 10 minutes) and then it very rapidly rose to 223, catching me by surprise. I'm much more comfortable with chocolate work than candy, and issues like this are the reason. As a result, the jelly layer is a little bit firmer than might be ideal, but it's still quite acceptable, and it made the centres very easy to dip.

The peanut butter gianduja was a delight, and set up nice and firm. I used one of the natural ones (Kraft makes a 100% peanuts version) on the advice of my partner, who cautioned that the stabilizers in a number of the commercial brands might be a problem. Had anyone tried to use the ones with additives, and did it make a difference?

I also attempted using texture sheets for the first time on a number of the chocolates, and I'm pleased with the overall results, although some of the sheets seem to have trapped some tiny air bubbles.

The final product is delicious!

PBJ closeup.jpg

Close-up of the finished chocolates (Photo credit: mkayahara)

PBJs arrayed.jpg

An array of PBJs (Photo credit: mkayahara)

PBJ better cross-section.jpg

In cross-section (My less skilled photography)

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On 1327783137' post='1860332, Matthew Hayday said:


The peanut butter gianduja was a delight, and set up nice and firm. I used one of the natural ones (Kraft makes a 100% peanuts version) on the advice of my partner, who cautioned that the stabilizers in a number of the commercial brands might be a problem. Had anyone tried to use the ones with additives, and did it make a difference?


As shown in this post, I just used regular Jif when I made them: it's not a problem at all, though Jif's ingredient list is none too exotic.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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On 1327787259' post='1860352, Chris Hennes said:


On 1327783137' post='1860332, Matthew Hayday said:


The peanut butter gianduja was a delight, and set up nice and firm. I used one of the natural ones (Kraft makes a 100% peanuts version) on the advice of my partner, who cautioned that the stabilizers in a number of the commercial brands might be a problem. Had anyone tried to use the ones with additives, and did it make a difference?


As shown in this post, I just used regular Jif when I made them: it's not a problem at all, though Jif's ingredient list is none too exotic.



Thanks Chris. I was reading over your great series of PBJ posts yesterday night - after my slab had started setting up - and saw the picture. I just wasn't sure if Jif made an all-natural brand (especially as we don't get Jif in Canada, as far as I can tell). I normally use a regular Kraft brand, which has the benefit of not needing to be refridgerated once open, and I'd prefer to go that route in the future.

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I have made the peanut gianduja using a regular peanut butter too (Skippy, I think) and it turned out fine. Flavor might be better with a natural peanut butter though.

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Thanks Chris. I was reading over your great series of PBJ posts yesterday night - after my slab had started setting up - and saw the picture. I just wasn't sure if Jif made an all-natural brand (especially as we don't get Jif in Canada, as far as I can tell). I normally use a regular Kraft brand, which has the benefit of not needing to be refridgerated once open, and I'd prefer to go that route in the future.

Jif's ingredients are:

Ingredients:

MADE FROM ROASTED PEANUTS AND SUGAR, CONTAINS 2% OR LESS OF: MOLASSES, FULLY HYDROGENATED VEGETABLE OILS (RAPESEED AND SOYBEAN), MONO AND DIGLYCERIDES, SALT.

Probably similar to what you've got available to you. I've never been that thrilled with the flavor of "natural" peanut butters, to be honest, but obviously use what tastes good to you...


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Today I made moulded bonbons, using Greweling's hazelnut gianduja recipe for the filling. We used the Vitamix to grind the heck out of the hazelnuts and incorporate the icing sugar and milk chocolate. The result was a wonderfully smooth texture, and it tempered nicely on the slab. The Vitamix really heats up as it goes though, so this is something to keep an eye on.

Hazelnut Gianduja - Closeup.jpg

Close-up of a finished bonbon.

This was my first use of a new set of moulds (from Chocolate World) that I got for Christmas, and which are eventually destined for cherry cordial use. They are really big, though, which is great for being able to fit a full cherry and fondant, but less good in terms of how much chocolate is needed to fill the moulds, and how much filling is then needed. I did up a partial batch of gianduja (about 650g total finished weight) and needed every last gram of it to fill 24 moulds.

Hazelnut Gianduja - Row.jpg

A row of finished chocolates.

I'm really happy with the end result, but given the size, I think these are more in the category of dessert for a day, rather than snack-size treats.

Neko and Bonbon.jpg

Neko, our Japanese good-luck cat, serving as an indicator as the chocolate size, and also indicating a desire for a slightly larger chocolate!

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I just recently got this book and can't wait to try more than a few of the recipes. I want to try to make the mint meltaways, and I have some questions about the Coconut oil. I was reading the there is one that has a melting point of about 92°F and one that has a melting point of about 72°F, which one is better for this recipe?

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I use coconut oil that is labeled that it melts at 76F and it works fine. I've made both mint and peanut butter meltaways with it.

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Thank you, I will have to pick that up at the store this weekend.

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Hey Everyone

Just saw the cover of the 2nd edition of C&C on Amazon, looks like it will be available in October. From a quick comparison, based on the 2 descriptions, the new edition will have 20 new formulas and 128 more pages. Not too much available about it, but I heard about this book a while back, neat to see the cover of the 2nd edition.

http://www.amazon.com/Chocolates-Confections-Formula-Technique-Confectioner/dp/0470424419

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Straight from the horses mouth - the new book will likely be out in December rather than October as told to him by the publisher. Nothing removed but lots of new material including a chapter on laminated centres.

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And with the amazon link, I just noticed a few days ago the preorder price came down $5

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Straight from the horses mouth - the new book will likely be out in December rather than October as told to him by the publisher. Nothing removed but lots of new material including a chapter on laminated centres.

What's a laminated centre? Or do i need to buy the book? :biggrin:

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Isn't a laminated center mean something gets folded in, like leaf croquant? Where did you hear that Kerry? In the amazon description it says it has a new section in American style layered candy bars, is that what your referring to? I'd also be interested in what the new formulas are, apparently were getting 30% more formulas, hopefully that darn Turkish delight recipe is modified to not have the modified cornstarch ;-)

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I think Kerry meant layered bars not laminated. Peter said new book will have 100 more pages. He is a really nice guy.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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Isn't a laminated center mean something gets folded in, like leaf croquant? Where did you hear that Kerry? In the amazon description it says it has a new section in American style layered candy bars, is that what your referring to? I'd also be interested in what the new formulas are, apparently were getting 30% more formulas, hopefully that darn Turkish delight recipe is modified to not have the modified cornstarch ;-)

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Indeed it is layered - my bad.

I don't think think the turkish delight will change - we will ask at dinner - but I know his Chocolates and Confections at home has a recipe that uses standard cornstarch.

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Your having dinner with him? Wow, that's cool. It was just wishful thinking for the Turkish delight, I wouldn't expect it to change. I've tried the recipe from the at home book and was not too thrilled with the final texture, it really was just OK, but lacked alot when compared to the delights I've gotton from the Arab market and abroad. Even here, I've gotton so many different brands, some are awful, others are fantastic. I've also tried many recipes online, but actually the one from the at home book came out much better then those, but you posted a recipe from a book who's authers last name I think is Leone, the delights in that text came out with an absolute perfect texture, but the texture degrades after about a week and a half.

Anyways, like I said, just wishful thinking, but it would be interesting to see if there will be any additional formulas to the crystalline and non crystalline chapters. I usually stick to items in that part of the book rather then and ganaches or items that have to be dipped.

Well, enjoy dinner, and do report back!

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Edited by minas6907 (log)

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Your having dinner with him? Wow, that's cool. It was just wishful thinking for the Turkish delight, I wouldn't expect it to change. I've tried the recipe from the at home book and was not too thrilled with the final texture, it really was just OK, but lacked alot when compared to the delights I've gotton from the Arab market and abroad. Even here, I've gotton so many different brands, some are awful, others are fantastic. I've also tried many recipes online, but actually the one from the at home book came out much better then those, but you posted a recipe from a book who's authers last name I think is Leone, the delights in that text came out with an absolute perfect texture, but the texture degrades after about a week and a half.

Anyways, like I said, just wishful thinking, but it would be interesting to see if there will be any additional formulas to the crystalline and non crystalline chapters. I usually stick to items in that part of the book rather then and ganaches or items that have to be dipped.

Well, enjoy dinner, and do report back!

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Apparently wishful thinking pays off - there will be a recipe in the new book for turkish delight that uses regular starch - as it's been recognized that thin boiling starch is difficult to obtain in reasonable quantities for folks even in the artisanal confectionary community.

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