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Spring

Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 2)

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I don't know what Grewling's technique is, but I did a lot of pumpkin marshmallows around Halloween last year. I put the pumpkin pie spice directly into my sugar syrup (and also in with the gelatin/puree mixture IIRC) and never had any problem with the spices separating.

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I don't know what Grewling's technique is, but I did a lot of pumpkin marshmallows around Halloween last year. I put the pumpkin pie spice directly into my sugar syrup (and also in with the gelatin/puree mixture IIRC) and never had any problem with the spices separating.

We do the exact same thing - cook pumpkin and spices with the sugar, and add spices to the gelatin and puree. We just tend to end up with some swirls of spice throughout, because the spices seemed to settle to the bottom of the bowl (though my recipe calls for lots and lots of spices, which may encourage that effect).

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I finally got to try the hot chocolates and they turned pretty good, I did a full batch since it seems that Greweling formulas don't split well, like for nougat etc. I should have asked this before finishing the chocolates but what is the best way to cut them? Unfortunately the ganache set too hard in my basement cause the temperatures and it end up cracking under the marshmallow, but was ok I guess since the marshmallow kept all together, the problem was doing a clean cut, the marhmallow tend to be sticky and the edges aren't clean and sharp so the final look of the chocolates isn't so attractive. Any tip? I really like the flavor and the combination.

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I finally got to try the hot chocolates and they turned pretty good, I did a full batch since it seems that Greweling formulas don't split well, like for nougat etc. I should have asked this before finishing the chocolates but what is the best way to cut them? Unfortunately the ganache set too hard in my basement cause the temperatures and it end up cracking under the marshmallow, but was ok I guess since the marshmallow kept all together, the problem was doing a clean cut, the marhmallow tend to be sticky and the edges aren't clean and sharp so the final look of the chocolates isn't so attractive. Any tip? I really like the flavor and the combination.

To cut, I use a very wide cheese slicer (2-handled 18" across variety) that has been lightly rubbed with cooking spray. It's still sticky but if you're patient, it will usually just fall away by itself, though sometimes I "encourage" it by pushing lightly.

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Ill try next time, thank you John :smile:

On another recipe, the Cocomels, I just made a batch yesterday and I will coat them today. I have few questions for who already made these.

-I have already noticed that the recipe for his carame ( the one with evaporated milk ) produce a very sticky caramel, much different from the one I am used to, and I dont necessarily like it. Is that the way it is or its just me?

-The coconut caramel layer is still kinda sticky and when I cut into it it tends to fall over the caramel layer. So the result is a kinda sticky too mushy coconut layer and a little bit to hard and sticky caramel. I know already this recipe isnt for me, its too sweet and too sticky.

I dont know why I am having such hard time with his recepies, the theory works fine for all the ganaches, but the other recepies are always a disapointing, or maybe I am cursing myself thinking the recepie isnt going to work :wacko: .

I am about to give up on some of his recepies and just keep the theory.

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we recently tried the leaf crocant recipe of greweling and of siefert, and the greweling recipe was easier to make and far more delicious. instead of using praline we use homemade peanut praline that KICKS ASS.. :raz:

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I made the lemon mint ganaches and marshmallows over the weekend.

I had some issues with the lemon mint ganache - it was quite soft at room temperature, and I was worried if i I stuck it in the frdige to help with chopping it (no guitar cutter here!), then I'd have issues once I coated them? Did I stuff up the recipe?

The marshmallows - I flavoured them with rosewater and cinnamon, and used all honey (instead of invert sugar). Really pleased with the flavour - but they got sticky after a couple of days. Once again - did I stuff up? :)

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I've made the Grewelling marshmallows often (its the primary marshmallow recipe I use) and haven't had any problems. I do use invert sugar though (although sometimes I sub out half the invert sugar for extra honey)

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Thanks! I've only got a little bit of invert sugar and keep saving it for a really "special" recipe ... maybe I should just find out where to buy more and use it!!!!

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Thanks!  I've only got a little bit of invert sugar and keep saving it for a really "special" recipe ... maybe I should just find out where to buy more and use it!!!!

You can make invert sugar very easily.

4 cups granulated sugar

1 1/2 cups water

1/4 teaspoon citric acid or juice of one lemon.

Combine all ingredients in a heavy 4-quart pan. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly to dissolve sugar. Lower heat and simmer for 1/2 hour, stirring occasionally. Store in tightly covered container.

That's it. It has worked for me.

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Thanks!  I've only got a little bit of invert sugar and keep saving it for a really "special" recipe ... maybe I should just find out where to buy more and use it!!!!

I notice you are in Victoria. You can buy invert sugar from Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School in Melbourne (as well as other chocolate supplies) if that's local for you.

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Thanks Darienne ... I'll try that next time ... MUCH cheaper than buying it!

Gap - the lot I have came from Savour! But they are a long way from where I live so not easy for me to stock up again (was also a bit pricey to use for anything but special!).

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Yesterday I tried the marzipan, apricot butter ganache, and a white chocolate marmalade butter ganache of my own formulaton. The butter ganache is exciting for those situations where you might be in a developing country and not have any cream :wacko: , like this week in Bhutan. I found the butter ganaches wanted to shatter as I cut them, but that may have been due to a chilly kitchen. Also not much apricot flavor, I think I need to concentrate my rather runny jam or use more jam next time. Is there any reason not to use butter ganache to fill shells? The keeping quality is attractive when thinking about doing some bonbons ahead for the holidays.

I found the marzipan a little soft, I don't know if that is due to lack of glucose or what. I cooked the syrup to 215F, or 17 degrees above boiling point (at 7500 feet), which is a few degrees hotter than recommended. I liked it better with 1/2 tsp almond extract added. I ended up adding icing sugar so it was stiffer and easier to dip, next time I think I would just cook the syrup hotter and maybe process it a little longer.

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I'm having a bit of trouble with the marshmallow recipe -- in two tries, I'm getting a substance more rubbery than airy. I'm guessing it's an issue with the gelatin, but I'm not sure.

I've been weighing out 160 bloom sheets (e.g., 20 grams for a half recipe of marshmallows), hydrating them, and then melting them over a double boiler. This process ends up with a lot of melted gelatin, and seems to be much more than the two percent the recipe calls for.

Am I missing something here? What's the proper way to measure the gelatin?

Thanks for any tips.

--Brent

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I'm having a bit of trouble with the marshmallow recipe -- in two tries, I'm getting a substance more rubbery than airy. I'm guessing it's an issue with the gelatin, but I'm not sure.

I've been weighing out 160 bloom sheets (e.g., 20 grams for a half recipe of marshmallows), hydrating them, and then melting them over a double boiler. This process ends up with a lot of melted gelatin, and seems to be much more than the two percent the recipe calls for.

Am I missing something here? What's the proper way to measure the gelatin?

Thanks for any tips.

--Brent

I always use the powdered gelatin for marshmallow.

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I'm having a bit of trouble with the marshmallow recipe -- in two tries, I'm getting a substance more rubbery than airy. I'm guessing it's an issue with the gelatin, but I'm not sure.

I've been weighing out 160 bloom sheets (e.g., 20 grams for a half recipe of marshmallows), hydrating them, and then melting them over a double boiler. This process ends up with a lot of melted gelatin, and seems to be much more than the two percent the recipe calls for.

Am I missing something here? What's the proper way to measure the gelatin?

Thanks for any tips.

--Brent

I always use the powdered gelatin for marshmallow.

Me, too. Haven't had any problems with powdered.

There's a great discussion of gelatin conversion in this thread. Warning: may contain arithmetic.  :wink:

Yes, that's a good thread to bookmark.

If you want to skip the math, go directly to: Gelatin Conversion - Post #18

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Pastrygirl the butter ganache (either Greweling) or other can be piped into shells no problem, I have few butter ganaches I use in my production for filled chocolates, its a very nice combination with the crispy shell and the soft melt in your mouth ganache, plus you have longer shelf life.

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If you want to skip the math, go directly to: Gelatin Conversion - Post #18

Greweling was kind enough to reply to a call for help. He states that gelatin use in the book is always powdered and of the Knox variety.

I looked at the sheet-to-powder conversion thread yesterday before posting here. It seems a bit of research went into it, but somehow the calculations (or my method) seem off, at least for the marshmallow recipe. For instance, take this snippet from the thread:

"Remember - this is by WEIGHT.

Knox x 1.19 = Silver"

In the marshmallow case, if I take the formula, I'd have to use 20 grams X 1.19 = 23.8 grams of sheet gelatin. In other words, MORE gelatin than the 20 grams I actually used.

One question I'd have is whether the weight includes hydration, or considers the dry weight of the gelatin sheet.

Twenty grams of powdered gelatin is roughly four packs; twenty grams of dry sheet gelatin is about eight sheets. When I hydrated-then-melted the 20 grams of sheets, I got something on the order of 1/2 cup of liquid gelatin, without much in the way of water content. I don't think that 20 grams of powdered gelatin, mixed into the water called for in the recipe, would yield a solution anywhere nearly as dense with gelatin.

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Trying the molded cherry cordials today. I thought the invertase would be a special order item but found it readily enough right here in town.

By the way, I counted about 40 drops invertase per 1/2 t. required by the full recipe.

The fondant I made using the recipe from French Professional Pastry series. It was almost identical (just a bit more water than Greweling) but they included a Machine method which worked just fine for me. Very smooth texture and fresh taste.

Can't wait to checkout my cordials in a week or so. :biggrin:

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The fondant I made using the recipe from French Professional Pastry series.  It was almost identical (just a bit more water than Greweling) but they included a Machine method which worked just fine for me.  Very smooth texture and fresh taste.

You used this only because they included a machine method, right? There is no reason to expect any textural difference compared to when using Greweling's (which is a bit of a pain!), is there? I had to pitch my invertase when I moved this summer, but I should order some more one of these days.

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I have a whole liter bottle that I've used 1/2 teaspoon out of. If you need some give me a shout. Fondant is just not my thing.

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The fondant I made using the recipe from French Professional Pastry series.  It was almost identical (just a bit more water than Greweling) but they included a Machine method which worked just fine for me.  Very smooth texture and fresh taste.

You used this only because they included a machine method, right? There is no reason to expect any textural difference compared to when using Greweling's (which is a bit of a pain!), is there? I had to pitch my invertase when I moved this summer, but I should order some more one of these days.

Yes, exactly... I just didn't want to stand there for 20 minutes mashing away with my palette knife. It probably took a little longer using the machine (using the hook attachment on Low setting) but I can do other things while my mixer is slaving away. I stopped it every now and again to give it a stir but otherwise it was fine by itself.

Texture seemed perfect to me.

About Invertase, I'd not be surprised to find it at a hobby store like Michaels or a cake decorating store; otherwise, oneline or one of the eG crew e.g. choux. :biggrin:

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Trying the molded cherry cordials today.  I thought the invertase would be a special order item but found it readily enough right here in town.

By the way, I counted about 40 drops invertase per 1/2 t. required by the full recipe.

The fondant I made using the recipe from French Professional Pastry series.  It was almost identical (just a bit more water than Greweling) but they included a Machine method which worked just fine for me.  Very smooth texture and fresh taste.

Can't wait to checkout my cordials in a week or so. :biggrin:

Could you tell us what the machine method was? Thanks

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Trying the molded cherry cordials today.  I thought the invertase would be a special order item but found it readily enough right here in town.

By the way, I counted about 40 drops invertase per 1/2 t. required by the full recipe.

The fondant I made using the recipe from French Professional Pastry series.  It was almost identical (just a bit more water than Greweling) but they included a Machine method which worked just fine for me.  Very smooth texture and fresh taste.

Can't wait to checkout my cordials in a week or so. :biggrin:

Could you tell us what the machine method was? Thanks

That's pretty much it: cook the syrup as usual, slab it on marble until cooled a bit, then transfer to the mixer and use the hook attachment on low until it's ready.

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