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Jim D.

Jim D.

I didn't get a response to my question under the marshmallow topic, so I'll try again in the Greweling discussion. I have more info since completing his marshmallow recipe.

 

I'm making a variation on the "Hot Chocolate" two-layer marshmallow recipe. I made his marshmallow recipe and spread it (with considerable difficulty) in a frame. I think I either overcooked the syrup or overbeat the marshmallow mixture. Then, for the second layer, instead of his chocolate ganache, I made a lime one (the idea of combining marshmallow and lime comes from Melissa Coppel). The lime recipe (from Ewald Notter) never really sets up firmly enough, so for dipping I added some white chocolate and cocoa butter, and it was better, but still rather soft. I let the lime set for more than a day, then applied a foot to the ganache, and cut the slab on a guitar (with the wires lightly oiled, marshmallow layer on top). It cut better than I anticipated, but I could tell the pieces were "melting" into each other. I chilled it and then tried to separate the pieces, but had to use an oiled knife. In some pieces the lime layer has separated from the marshmallow. They look OK (but not great) and are rather rough around the edges. I can see that whereas I could dip them, they would not look great.

 

The taste of marshmallow and lime is delicious together, but what could be done to improve the situation? The marshmallow was rather firm, so if I made it more pliable, then I am sure it would never cut on a guitar and the pieces would certainly flow back together once the wires had passed through. Just as obvious (from Greweling's photo and photos on eGullet from those who have made the Hot Chocolate recipe), the recipe as written does work.

 

I'm thinking of translating the recipe into a molded piece, with pipeable marshmallow (undercooked and underbeaten) and a layer of lime ganache on top, but I hate to admit defeat. Any ideas are welcome.

Jim D.

Jim D.

I didn't get a response to my question under the marshmallow topic, so I'll try again in the Greweling discussion. I have more info since completing his marshmallow recipe.

 

I'm making a variation on the "Hot Chocolate" two-layer marshmallow recipe. I made his marshmallow recipe and spread it (with considerable difficulty) in a frame. I think I either overcooked the syrup or overbeat the marshmallow mixture. Then, for the second layer, instead of his chocolate ganache, I made a lime one (the idea of combining marshmallow and lime comes from Melissa Coppel). The lime recipe (from Ewald Notter) never really sets up firmly enough, so for dipping I added some white chocolate and cocoa butter, and it was better, but still rather soft. I let the lime set for more than a day, then applied a foot to the ganache, and cut the slab on a guitar (with the wires lightly oiled, marshmallow layer on top). It cut better than I anticipated, but I could tell the pieces were "melting" into each other. I chilled it and then tried to separate the pieces, but had to use an oiled knife. In some pieces the lime layer has separated from the marshmallow. They look OK (but not great) and are rather rough around the edges. I can see that whereas I could dip them, they would not look great.

 

The taste of marshmallow and lime is delicious together, but what could be done to improve the situation? The marshmallow was rather firm, so if I made it more pliable, then I am sure it would never cut on a guitar and the pieces would certainly flow back together once the wires had passed through. Just as obvious (from Greweling's photo and photos on eGullet who have made the Hot Chocolate recipe), the recipe as written does work.

 

I'm thinking of translating the recipe into a molded piece, with pipeable marshmallow (undercooked and underbeaten) and a layer of lime ganache on top, but I hate to admit defeat. Any ideas are welcome.

Jim D.

Jim D.

I didn't get a response to my question under the marshmallow topic, so I'll try again in the Greweling discussion. I have more info since completing his marshmallow recipe.

 

I'm making a variation on the "Hot Chocolate" two-layer marshmallow recipe. I made his marshmallow recipe and spread it (with considerable difficulty) in a frame. I think I either overcooked the syrup or overbeat the marshmallow mixture. Then, for the second layer, instead of his chocolate ganache, I made a lime one (the idea of combining marshmallow and lime comes from Melissa Coppel). The lime recipe (from Ewald Notter) never really sets up firmly enough, so for dipping I added some white chocolate and cocoa butter, and it was better, but still rather soft. I let the lime set for more than a day, then applied a foot to the ganache, and cut the slab on a guitar (with the wires lightly oiled, marshmallow layer on top). It cut better than I anticipated, but I could tell the pieces were "melting" into each other. I chilled it and then tried to separate the pieces, but had to use an oiled knife. In some pieces the lime layer has separated from the marshmallow. They look OK (but not great) and are rather rough around the edges. I can see that whereas I could drip them, they would not look great.

 

The taste of marshmallow and lime is delicious together, but what could be done to improve the situation? The marshmallow was rather firm, so if I made it more pliable, then I am sure it would never cut on a guitar and the pieces would certainly flow back together once the wires had passed through. Just as obvious (from Greweling's photo and photos on eGullet who have made the Hot Chocolate recipe), the recipe as written does work.

 

I'm thinking of translating the recipe into a molded piece, with pipeable marshmallow (undercooked and underbeaten) and a layer of lime ganache on top, but I hate to admit defeat. Any ideas are welcome.

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