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munchymom

eG Foodblog: munchymom - Livin' La Vida Locavore

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Good morning! Today's breakfast used up a little more of the CSA box:

attachicon.gifDSCN0522.jpg

Two-egg frittata with broccoli, red bell pepper, cherry tomatoes, and fresh chevre.

If anyone's keeping score at home, I still have a few cherry tomatoes, three slicing tomatoes, half a watermelon, three ears of corn, and a bell pepper to eat up before the week's out.

You have fresh chevre and fresh mozz -- both from the same place? Is there a lot of local cheese making going on in Florida?

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Last night's dinner was definitely not authentic, local, or artisanal, but it sure was tasty.

Chicken tamale pie:

DSCN0533.jpg

Filling:

1 pound boneless skinless chicken breast

1 can green enchilada sauce (10 oz.)

1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper

1/2 cup chopped scallions

1 cup corn kernels (from 1 ear of corn)

Simmer the chicken in the enchilada sauce at very low temperature until chicken is just cooked through; set chicken aside. Boil the remaining sauce until it is thickened. When the chicken has cooled off a bit, shred into small pieces.

Saute red pepper, scallions, and corn; add shredded chicken and enchilada sauce and heat through. Place in small casserole.

Topping:

1 Jiffy cornbread mix (8.5 oz.)

1/3 cup milk

1 egg

3/4 cup shredded Mexican-style cheese

Combine all ingredients and stir until blended; spread over filling.

Bake casserole at 375 for 30 minutes.

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The chevre I used isn't local - just Whole Foods 365 brand. There is local cheesemaking but I haven't really sought much of it out yet.

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Smithy, not too personal at all. I'm cooking for myself, my husband, and my 11 year old son. We relocated here from Charlotte for my husband's work. The husband is easy to cook for - he likes everything except garlic and pork. The kid is kind of a challenge as he is extremely picky and not into most of what I make - he ends up eating a peanut butter sandwich a lot of nights.

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Is this CSA box typical for your CSA? We tried the one in our area a couple of summers ago, and were disappointed. It seemed like every week, the bulk of our share was made up of a giant bunch of one variety or another of kale. We'd get other stuff too, but the kale was overwhelming. We were not able to have a list of dislikes as everyone got the same box, although it was possible to add "extras" if you wanted.

Do you ever feel overwhelmed by some vegetable that keeps recurring in your CSA box like a horror movie nightmare?

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October was the Month of Eggplant. I like eggplant, but it's usually a "once every month or two" thing in our house rather than a "twice a week" thing.

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Munchymom, where did you get the mozz cheese? I live in Pompano, but I've never heard of a local dairy! It must be close to the county line (Broward/Palm Beach) with a 426 phone exchange...

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It came from the Wellington Whole Foods but I've seen it other places around town. The brand is Mozzarita.

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H! I'm hunkered down in Texas norther right now! What a contrast!

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Pizza and a beautiful beach with gorgeous blue ocean water. Heavenly.

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As the week winds down, I get into the "must use everything up" mode, because I know there's more coming tomorrow.

A poolside mimosa with juice from the remaining Cara Cara oranges:

DSCN0542.jpg

Tomatoes and chevre on toast:

DSCN0545.jpg

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As the week winds down, I get into the "must use everything up" mode, because I know there's more coming tomorrow.

A poolside mimosa with juice from the remaining Cara Cara oranges:

attachicon.gifDSCN0542.jpg

Tomatoes and chevre on toast:

attachicon.gifDSCN0545.jpg

Looking at the angle that "poolside mimosa" was taken from, it appears you're IN the pool. Is this fair? Is this right? Speaking as someone who's looking out at frozen snow, I say it isn't.

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Haha. It's all fair. I've seen seasons and they're over rated

Give me temperate weather year round. Boring to some paradise to others

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The only thing I like about seasons are the crisp fall days and brilliant leaves, and maybe a fire in the fireplace. That's IT! (The fire's for ambiance, not really for heat!)

ETA: ambiance


Edited by judiu (log)

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Love the pizza at the beach pic.

I like seasons, although I have not yet adapted to freezing temperatures and 30 mph winds. Give it time, though. Dog days and a little icy chill are necessary to fully appreciate spring and fall.

Looking forward to the remainder of your foodblog.

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Last meal of the week:

DSCN0551.jpg

Chicken sandwich with tomato, pickles, and barbecue sauce, and potato salad.

That was the last of the week's tomatoes, and the men of the household ate the remains of the broccoli and red peppers with some pasta for lunch. So we've eaten all the farm food for the week, and my refrigerator is ready to receive tomorrow's batch, plus the ingredients for my first hot-climate Thanksgiving.

Thanks all for following along.

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Thanks for blogging this week! And yes, I'd like to know your "first hot-climate Thanksgiving" plans also.

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I can't bring myself to give up any of my favorites - turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie - even though they don't really fit with 80 degree temperatures. I'll have lots of sweet corn, so I might do a corn pudding or spoon bread. I'll have lots of tomatoes but I'm not sure where to fit them into the meal.

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I can't bring myself to give up any of my favorites - turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie - even though they don't really fit with 80 degree temperatures. I'll have lots of sweet corn, so I might do a corn pudding or spoon bread. I'll have lots of tomatoes but I'm not sure where to fit them into the meal.

I am a 60 year-old who is a native southern Californian and every few years we have an unseasonable warm Thanksgiving in the 80s. The traditional Thanksgiving meal is still wonderful.

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The weather doesn't matter when you have central air conditioning.

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A page out my gardening grandpa's book: slice thickly, serve on a crystal plate with a sprinkle of sugar and a dab of Hellman's. Yum! (And ain't we lucky to have ripe tomatoes in November?)

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