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Anova Jeff

Anova Sous Vide Circulator (Part 2)

479 posts in this topic

Defrosting or thawing has been discussed in forums.egullet.org/topic/146389-sous-vide-and-frozen-meat/.
The quintessence is:

Someone mentioned it being safer to thaw in the heated water bath because its quicker but i disagree. Its safer to thaw in water below 40F. I always thaw large meat items in a bucket of 35-38F ice water in the fridge overnight. Smaller meats like steaks only take an hour or so to thaw.


There are 3 separate procedures that need to be distinguished: thaw from frozen, reheat from frozen and cook from frozen. If your goal is to thaw from frozen for later cooking with another method, then you should ideally thaw in a circulating 4C water bath until defrosted. However, if you intend to thaw and then immediately cook or reheat SV, then it is better to combine the thaw and cook into a single step and thaw directly in the bath.

My 2 cents: cook directly from frozen in a water bath at target temperature, use cooking time according to Douglas Baldwin's tables with an additional 50%.

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Peter F. Gruber aka Pedro

eG Ethics Signatory

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My 2 cents: cook directly from frozen in a water bath at target temperature, use cooking time according to Douglas Baldwin's tables with an additional 50%.

well, in my case, we were thawing frozen turkey breasts so that they could be butterflied, pounded, and rolled up with the right herbs and seasonings, to then be rebagged and cooked the next day.

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I found that for the time being :

http://forum.chefsteps.com/discussion/674/cold-smoking-temperature-dangers

with this comment :

"If you are going to cold smoke it less than 4 hours, then under the FDA rules you can use any temperature. If you are going to cold smoke it for longer periods of time, at temperatures below 54 °C / 129 °F, then you are going to need to achieve a certain salinity level within the meat, a low enough pH, and/or include nitrite salts.

If you have a hardtime keeping your smoker's temperature low enough, one thing I like to do is add a bunch of ice to the smoker. The ice takes a huge amount of heat energy to melt, which keeps the temperature from spiking. "

I keep on looking and will let you know what I find...

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I cold smoke for 30-45 minutes at <250 F then SV. Lots of smoke flavor and super-tender turkey

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Thank you... But 250 F is very hot, i do not understand. It is 121 Celsius... :shock:

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I'm also confused by this statement. Sounds like hot smoking for a short time


Edited by scubadoo97 (log)

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My smoker directions for cold smoking say to shut it down if temp inside reaches 90F. 250F is max on my smoker. 225F is the temp for smoking ribs, pulled pork, etc.

Thats why I am thinking maybe 175F-200F for one hour for a turkey breast(?)

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Just to jump in on the defrosting conversation... It is NOT safe to use the Anova as a defrosting tool. The Anova can only heat water, not cool it.

The fastest and best way to defrost is to place the meat in an airtight bag and place it in an ice water bath inside the fridge. The ice ensures that the water begins at a temperature NOT in the danger zone. The fridge ensures that the water temperature moves to a temperature still out of the danger zone. Therefore, no portion of your meat will ever be at an unsafe temperature.


Ryan Imgrund

Food Lover and Published Foodborne Pathogen Expert

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Just to jump in on the defrosting conversation... It is NOT safe to use the Anova as a defrosting tool. The Anova can only heat water, not cool it.

The fastest and best way to defrost is to place the meat in an airtight bag and place it in an ice water bath inside the fridge. The ice ensures that the water begins at a temperature NOT in the danger zone. The fridge ensures that the water temperature moves to a temperature still out of the danger zone. Therefore, no portion of your meat will ever be at an unsafe temperature.

Harold McGee seems to think otherwise:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/dining/a-hot-water-bath-for-thawing-meats-the-curious-cook.html?_r=1&

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Just to jump in on the defrosting conversation... It is NOT safe to use the Anova as a defrosting tool. The Anova can only heat water, not cool it.

The fastest and best way to defrost is to place the meat in an airtight bag and place it in an ice water bath inside the fridge. The ice ensures that the water begins at a temperature NOT in the danger zone. The fridge ensures that the water temperature moves to a temperature still out of the danger zone. Therefore, no portion of your meat will ever be at an unsafe temperature.

I'm with Harold McGee on the issue, actually.

your method sounds great if you've got a couple days to get things defrosted, though :)


Edited by SleeperService (log)

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I actually ordered my Anova because of the information on the forum and ordering it is also the reason that I have now joined the forum...

The case is that my Anova has just arrived (I'm in The Netherlands) after taking a short holiday in Chicago it seems. However, using it has been challenging in the fact that it keeps displaying "system: low liquid", no matter what I do.

Any suggestions?

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How high up does your liquid go?

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First i filled it to around halfway between the min-mark and the max-mark. Later I filled it to the max-mark. No difference.

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email Jeff Anova

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I actually ordered my Anova because of the information on the forum and ordering it is also the reason that I have now joined the forum...

The case is that my Anova has just arrived (I'm in The Netherlands) after taking a short holiday in Chicago it seems. However, using it has been challenging in the fact that it keeps displaying "system: low liquid", no matter what I do.

Any suggestions?

There's three small rods that come down from the top, the longest that ends near the middle of the heating coil is the temp sensor, the other two are the level sensors. I'd try wiping them off, maybe they got coated with some gunk while partying in chicago ;) unscrew the bottom, then carefully twist and remove the stainless skirt as per directions in the manual.

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With my unit, I intend to descale it with vinegared water from time to time... May be you should try that Mol Air...

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Is it safe to descale with vinegar? I was wondering about that...

Also, having used my Anova a bit more, it seems like the difference between the Anova temp read and my thermapen temp read is higher as the temp goes higher. I made carrots sous vide (came out delicious!) and when set at 83 C, my thermapen registered about 1.2 degrees (F) off.

I emailed help @ anova but didn't hear back there (or here in this thread). I'm still not sure which device to trust. Given that the temp difference is not consistent across all temperatures, if the Anova is off then calibration won't resolve it I guess...

I'm not sure how much it matters for most cooking I Will do. I guess the best test would be eggs. Maybe I will try those later this week...

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Also, having used my Anova a bit more, it seems like the difference between the Anova temp read and my thermapen temp read is higher as the temp goes higher. I made carrots sous vide (came out delicious!) and when set at 83 C, my thermapen registered about 1.2 degrees (F) off.

I'd noticed that mine was reading about .6f lower than my non-thermopen fast digital thermometer... which is close enough for me, then I got a second anova yesterday, and notice that they're both reading about .6f lower than my digital... either both my anovas are off by the same amount, or it's the thermometer.

I suggest getting a second (third?) opinion.

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Also, having used my Anova a bit more, it seems like the difference between the Anova temp read and my thermapen temp read is higher as the temp goes higher. I made carrots sous vide (came out delicious!) and when set at 83 C, my thermapen registered about 1.2 degrees (F) off.

I'd noticed that mine was reading about .6f lower than my non-thermopen fast digital thermometer... which is close enough for me, then I got a second anova yesterday, and notice that they're both reading about .6f lower than my digital... either both my anovas are off by the same amount, or it's the thermometer.

I suggest getting a second (third?) opinion.

Thermapen accuracy specs: ±0.7°F (±0.4°C) from -58 to 392°F

http://www.thermoworks.com/products/thermapen/#Specifications


Monterey Bay area

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Also, having used my Anova a bit more, it seems like the difference between the Anova temp read and my thermapen temp read is higher as the temp goes higher. I made carrots sous vide (came out delicious!) and when set at 83 C, my thermapen registered about 1.2 degrees (F) off.

I'd noticed that mine was reading about .6f lower than my non-thermopen fast digital thermometer... which is close enough for me, then I got a second anova yesterday, and notice that they're both reading about .6f lower than my digital... either both my anovas are off by the same amount, or it's the thermometer.

I suggest getting a second (third?) opinion.

Thermapen accuracy specs: ±0.7°F (±0.4°C) from -58 to 392°F

http://www.thermoworks.com/products/thermapen/#Specifications

Well, 1.2 is more than the listed accuracy window. And the thermapen registers a perfect 32 F when I follow the calibration steps they recommend (crushed ice with cold water to cover, stick in the pen and stir, etc.)

I guess another possible test would be to set it to 99 C and see if the water boils (shouldn't).

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Well, 1.2 is more than the listed accuracy window. And the thermapen registers a perfect 32 F when I follow the calibration steps they recommend (crushed ice with cold water to cover, stick in the pen and stir, etc.)

I guess another possible test would be to set it to 99 C and see if the water boils (shouldn't).

I haven't tried setting my anova to lower than 32f, and seeing what it reads in an ice bath, I don't even know if it can be set that low.

might have to try that. I know I can set it to 60f and just use it to stir up the water.


Edited by SleeperService (log)

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What does McGee suggest?

"At the U.S.D.A. labs in Beltsville, Md., Janet S. Eastridge and Brian C. Bowker test-thawed more than 200 one-inch-thick beef strip loin steaks in three different groups: some in a refrigerator at 37 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit, some in a constantly circulating water bath at 68 degrees, and some in a water bath at 102 degrees.

Air-thawing in the refrigerator took 18 to 20 hours, while the room-temperature water bath thawed the steaks in about 20 minutes, and the hot-summer-day bath in 11 minutes. These water-bath times are so short that any bacterial growth would remain within safe limits."

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