Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Anova Jeff

Anova Sous Vide Circulator (Part 2)

Recommended Posts

So, the expense incurred:

199 USD for the circulator

69.95 USD for shipping and handling to the UK

I did get hit for vat on import as expected - 20%.

I did not get hit for Duty as the total value was too low, but if you're ordering multiple items, you may do, so bear that in mind - the best lookup I could do suggested this would be just above 4%. That was classing it as a water heater - bear in mind I didn't have to test that this was what customs would have applied.

Annoyingly, I also got hit by a fixed charge from the courier company for having to handle the customs clearing - I stupidly left the invoice at work, but it was around 14 GBP. The rest of the charges I understood and it's up to me to decide whether I'm happy or not to place an order, but this was a surprise and left me a little less than gruntled given that the courier was their choice and would clearly be dealing with a cross border shipment, I expected this would be included. It's small, but I will complain about this to Anova.

I'm going to leave my comments on whether I'm happy with the overall cost until I have had a chance to use it a bit more - initial impressions in use are great and temp appears to be spot on, but I am heading to Italy tomorrow and won't be using it for a week. I also have a pet peeve about amazon style reviews after owning products for a couple of hours which I don't wish to resemble.

Hope that helps those considering a purchase for now.

Thanks for posting the total cost.

I make that around £195 not including the £14 surcharge - which is very odd considering you're paying for international shipping and handling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two dumb newbie questions...

Tried to switch to F from C but I can't seem to get to the screen and the silly diagram isn't helping. I thought I saw this in one of the "unboxing" videos but can't quite get there. Hints?

Second question. I remember reading here that the docs came on USB but my unit came with hard copy. I assume they switched to paper but just want to make sure I don't loose something in the unboxing.


Edited by johnelle (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two dumb newbie questions...

Tried to switch to F from C but I can't seem to get to the screen and the silly diagram isn't helping. I thought I saw this in one of the "unboxing" videos but can't quite get there. Hints?

Second question. I remember reading here that the docs came on USB but my unit came with hard copy. I assume they switched to paper but just want to make sure I don't loose something in the unboxing.

Welcome to eG. When you first turn the unit on you should see a screen that offers "Press here to enter system config. Tap to enter. This should bring up a degrees C square. Tap the square to change to degrees F then tap to save and exit. My guess is that if you got a printed manual you will not also have a manual on USB. Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first unit came (ordered in August) with a silver usb thumb drive. My original unit was miscalibrated, and its replacement (arrive in late October) came with an orange credit card shaped drive.

I ordered a second unit that arrived this week, it had a printed manual, no thumb drive.

I just completed editing a video showing how I have configured my two Anova units. I will post it here as soon as it has finished rendering and I have uploaded it to YouTube. Hopefully some folks may find it useful/entertaining.


Edited by alanz (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for taking the time to make and post the video Alan, it's excellent and by far the best I've seen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 220v version is working magnificently in its new chillybin/Esky/beer cooler (strike out geographically inapplicable terms). No evaporation I've noticed, and the outer walls stay cool.

Yesterday was my best-ever pork belly (around 11 hours at 78°C), and when that came out I added a couple of litres of cold water to get the temperature down and started some beef short ribs, destined to be tomorrow night's dinner after 48 hours at 54°.

What's was really impressive over the wekend was watching the Anova come to temperature. For the pork belly, it hit 78, wobbled twice back to 77.9 then stabiised really quickly. For the ribs it overshot the target (by a whole 0.1°) and spent a little while alternating between 54 and 54.1 but was rock-solid on 54 when I checked on it this morning.

The sound of the fan/propeller is noticeable - our kitchen is beside the lounge and can't be closed off - but is quite acceptable from the bedroom. And ours is not a big house.

I'm very happy with my Anova. You should get one, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The more water Anova has the quieter she is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a lot of common sense people on here have higher standards for patents than currently happen in the US market. My common-sense idea is that you patent a somewhat new idea. Somewhat being decided by a patent office, these standards are extremely low. Heating element+impeller+temp regulator=legal, this has been used by science for a long time. I've worked in science labs that used thermal immersion circulators from many different companies.

Heating element+impeller+temp regulator+housing=patent worthy product?? I don't know about this or the details about patent law, I do know that the US has an industry for patents...the question is if you think this contributes to a common good, is our (cooking) society improved by this. My answer would be no, like I said before this has made me lose all support for Polyscience, let them compete by giving people jobs who can figure out a way to create/market a new device, this may lead to new and better devices instead of new and longer lawsuits

It is not the first time Polyscience is fighting against companies copying the design of their Sous vide professional immersion circulator.

A blogger has already pointed out a similar issue in the past with Vac-star on this page. On the same site you can see a pdf document with equipment comparison with this comment "You may have understood that Creative Series of Polyscience is the SousvideChef v1 rebranded Polyscience. This immersion circulator is now officially made in China."

The problem with Sansaire is the lack of innovation in the product (except the low price) compared to the design of Nomiku and Anova. People should understand it is easy to copy each another (Polyscience for instance) and manufacture a cheap product in China but one day you should be punished for that. My understanding is that Sansaire copied the inside casing design of the Polyscience machine (like Vac-star did). This is probably why Sansaire just informed Kickstarter's backers that the launch of the Sansaire is postponed to January 2014. They have to redesign the mold of the Sansaire or pay fines...

Anyway it is a pity such project is going in that direction. Designing a machine by a 3rd party (mentioned in this video) and being sued for patent infringement is so far away from the original idea of the DIY immersion circulator of Seattlefoodgeek...


Edited by FranzWagner (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

excellent video alanz

this will help many first timers to both SV and Anova.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great video thanks! -- I did have to laugh that I have had the lid on upside down this whole time.... I am definitely interested in seeing the video on how you cut out the cooler -- might just be what I need to get another Anova!

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I'm in Canada and I was ready to order the circulator for my birthday. However, shipping is more the 60$ so it killed my enthusiasm. I've tried to contact the company to see if it was possible to get a cheaper (slower) shipping option, but after sending 2 emails to 2 different adresses I've never received an answer. Now I'm a bit worried about customer service. Has anybody else ordered from Canada?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind words about the video. When I make a video about cutting the lids, I'll have to show alternate techniques to the one I used (I have a 14" bandsaw that I suspect others do not). So I'll attempt to show using a coping saw, fret saw, or jigsaw to make the cuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One question I was unclear about when I bought my unit was what polycarbonate tub to buy. I went with a 12 quart cambro http://amzn.com/B0001MRUKA which it turns out is a perfect fit for the unit and plenty big enough for a two person household. The only issue was I managed to put an additional crack in the lid while I was cutting it. Their "snap lid" is very flexible but don't be fooled--it is easy to crack if you're not careful. I should have scored it with a utility knife first.


Edited by johnelle (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I'm in Canada and I was ready to order the circulator for my birthday. However, shipping is more the 60$ so it killed my enthusiasm. I've tried to contact the company to see if it was possible to get a cheaper (slower) shipping option, but after sending 2 emails to 2 different adresses I've never received an answer. Now I'm a bit worried about customer service. Has anybody else ordered from Canada?

The shipping to Canada is all in - courier, broker fees, GST etc. It's worth it unless you have a US address to ship to then pick up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's good to know, thanks.

The shipping to Canada is all in - courier, broker fees, GST etc. It's worth it unless you have a US address to ship to then pick up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adam,

I do my best to stay off camera... the shy, demure creature that I am <s>

And as a reminder, the new URL for the updated video (not the one you quoted) is

www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTrYNEeH03I


Edited by alanz (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. What a great video! Exceptionally done.

I think it would be nice to see how easy it is to modify a cooler for the Anova. (I just used a box cutter.) But I think everyone should know that it is something that they can do-- and shouldn't be scared away by it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind words about the video. When I make a video about cutting the lids, I'll have to show alternate techniques to the one I used (I have a 14" bandsaw that I suspect others do not). So I'll attempt to show using a coping saw, fret saw, or jigsaw to make the cuts.

Any progress with this 2nd video? I have a cooler lid I want to cut and would love to see how you do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Greenmonk,

I might get to do it this weekend. I need to get another cooler for the video, and there is an additional feature I want to add to the polycarbonate lid.

My process for the cooler lid will be this:

  • Mark the area that you want to cut out
  • Drill a hole or two in the area that you will cut out
  • Insert the nozzle of a can of expanding foam and try to fill the area around the cutout
  • Let the foam cure overnight
  • Cut the top (this area should now have a foam core) with a coping saw, jig saw, band saw, etc.

Sound reasonable?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By boilsover
      Solid intermediate cook, here.  Not especially intimidated by elaborate preps.  But I'm new to SV, and would like a recommendation for a cookbook for guidance and exploration.
       
      I was thinking of Tom Keller's Under Pressure, but I'm wondering if the preps he includes may not be the most generally useful.  What do you all like, and why?
       
      Thanks!
    • By Chris Hennes
      On Nov. 7, 2017, Modernist Bread will finally arrive on my doorstep. Having preordered it literally the first day it was available, to say I'm excited about this book is a bit of an understatement. The team at The Cooking Lab have been gracious enough to give @Dave the Cook and me early electronic access to the book and so I've spent the last week pouring over it. I'm just going to start with a few initial comments here (it's 2600 pages long, so a full review is going to take some time, and require a bunch of baking!). Dave and I would also be happy to answer any questions you've got.
       
      One of the main things I've noticed about this book is a change in tone from the original Modernist Cuisine. It comes across as less "everything you know is wrong" and more "eighty bazillion other bakers have contributed to this knowledge and here's our synthesis of it." I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that Myhrvold and company are now the most experienced bread-bakers in the world. Not necessarily in terms of the number of identical loaves they've produced, but in the shear number of different recipes and techniques they've tried and the care with which they've analyzed the results. These volumes are a distillation of 100,000 years of human breadmaking experience, topped off with a dose of the Modernist ethos of taking what we know to the next level.
       
      The recipes include weight, volume, and baker's percentages, and almost all of them can be made by both a home baker and someone baking in a commercial facility. The home baker might need to compromise on shape (e.g. you can't fit a full-length baguette in most home ovens) but the book provides clear instructions for both the amateur and professional. The recipes are almost entirely concentrated in volumes 4 and 5, with very few in the other volumes (in contrast to Modernist Cuisine, where there were many recipes scattered throughout). I can't wait for the physical volumes to arrive so that I can have multiple volumes open at once, the recipes cross-reference techniques taught earlier quite frequently.
    • By eG Forums Host
      Introduction

      Welcome to the index for the Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques, & Equipment topic, one of the largest and most influential topics on eG Forums. (The topic has been closed to keep the index stable and reliable; you can find another general SV discussion topic here.) This index is intended to help you navigate the thousands of posts and discussions to make this rich resource more useful and accessible.

      In order to understand sous vide cooking, it's best to clear up some misconceptions and explain some basics. Sous vide cooking involves vacuum-sealing food in a plastic bag and cooking it in a water bath at precise temperatures. Though it translates literally as "under vacuum," "Sous vide" is often taken to mean "under pressure," which is a misnomer; not all SV cooking involves food cooked in conditions that exceed atmospheric pressure. (See below.) In addition, calculations for SV cooking involve not only time and temperature but also thickness. Finally, due to the anaerobic conditions inside the bag and the low temperatures used, food safety issues are paramount.

      You can read the basics of SV cooking and equipment here. In the summer of 2005, Nathan Myhrvold (Society member nathanm) posted this informative, "I'm now going to answer my own initial questions" post, which addresses just about everything up to that point. For what came next, read on -- and be sure to order Nathan Myhrvold's highly anticipated Modernist Cuisine book, due in spring 2011.

      As with all indexes of on-going discussions, this one has limitations. We've done our best to create a user-friendly taxonomy emphasizing the categories that have come up repeatedly. In addition, the science, technology, and recipes changed over time, and opinions varied greatly, so be sure to read updated information whenever possible.

      Therefore, we strongly encourage you to keep these issues in mind when reading the topic, and particularly when considering controversial topics related to food safety, doneness, delta T cooking, and so on. Don't read a first post's definitive claim without reading down the topic, where you'll likely find discussion, if not heated debate or refutation, of that claim. Links go to the first post in a series that may be discontinuous, so be sure to scan a bit more to get the full discussion.

      Recipes were chosen based solely on having a clear set of information, not on merit. Indeed, we've included several stated failures for reference. Where possible, recipes include temperature and time in the link label -- but remember that thickness is also a crucial variable in many SV preparations. (See below for more information on thickness.)

      History, Philosophy & Value of SV/LTLT Cooking

      Over the years, we've talked quite a bit about SV as a concept, starting with this discussion about how SV cooking got started. There have also been several people who asked, Why bother with SV in the first place? (See also this discussion.) What with all the electronics and plastic bags, we asked: Does SV food lack passion? Finally, there have been several discussions about the value of SV cooking in other eG Forums topics, such as the future of SV cooking, No More Sous Vide -- PLEASE!, is SV "real cooking," and what's the appeal of SV?

      Those who embrace SV initially seek ideas about the best applications for their new equipment. Discussions have focused on what a first SV meal should be -- see also this discussion -- and on the items for which SV/LTLT cooking is best suited. There's much more along those lines here, here, and here.

      Vacuums and Pressure in Sous Vide Cooking

      As mentioned above, there has been great confusion about vacuums, pressure, and their role SV cooking. Here is a selection of discussion points on the subject, arranged chronologically; please note that later posts in a given discussion may refute earlier ones:

      Do you need a vacuum for SV cooking, and, if so, why? What exactly is a "vacuum"? Click here, here, and ff. Are items in vacuum-sealed bags "under pressure"? Does a vacuum sealer create a vacuum inside the bag? Do you really need a vacuum, or can you use ZipLoc bags? Also see here, here, and here. If "sous vide" means "under pressure," aren't the items in the bag under pressure? There is more along these lines to be found in this discussion.  

      The Charts

      We've collected the most important of many charts in the SV topic here. Standing above the rest are Nathan Myhrvold's charts for cooking time versus thickness and desired core temperature. We worked with him to create these three reformatted protein tables, for beef, fish, and chicken & pork.

      Nathan provides additional information on his charts here. Information on how to read these charts can be found in this post. For an explanation of "rest time" in Nathan's tables, click here.

      Other Society members helped out as well. Douglas Baldwin references his heating time table for different geometric factors (slab/cylinder/sphere) here; the pdf itself can be found here. pounce created a post with all three tables as neatly formatted images. derekslager created two monospace font charts of Nathan's meat table and his fish table.

      Camano Chef created a cumulative chart with information gathered from other sources including Thomas Keller's Ad Hoc. Douglas Baldwin shared this chart devoted to pasteurizing poultry. PedroG detailed heat loss and steady state energy consumption of sous vide cookers in these charts.

      Finally, there is also an eG Forums topic on cooling rates that may be of interest.

      Acknowledgment & Comments

      This index was built by Chris Amirault, Director, eG Forums. It was reviewed by the eGullet Society volunteer team as well as many Society members. Please send questions or comments to Chris via messenger or email.
       
       
    • By Paul Bacino
      Wonder if someone could get me in the ballpark..the amount of Transglutamase...to make scallop noodles..    %  I mean
       
      ill use a food processor..to purée the scallop..  then inject into a water or broth..to cook?
    • By TomRahav
      Hi,
      I've tried to make the spherical mussels recipe from the Modernist Cuisine books and it didn't work as I expected, so I would appreciate any advice that may help here.
      The recipe calls for calcium gluconate which I couldn't get hold of, so I replaced it with calcium lactate gluconate that I had at home. I used the same ration (2.5%)
      When I tried to create the spheres in the sodium alginate bath I encountered two main problems;
      1. instead of spheres the mixture just stayed as uneven shape on the surface. The bath was 1Kg. water with 5gr. sodium alginate and I let it rest in the fridge for 24 hours before using it so I think the problem is not here. However, the mussels jus mixture (100gr. mussels jus, 0.5gr. xanthin gum and and 2.5gr. calcium lactate gluconate) had a lot of air bubbles in it. Can that be the issue?
      2. In the book the spheres seem to be completely transparent whereas my mussels jus mixture was pretty white and opaque. Is it because I replaced calcium gluconate with calcium lactate gluconate? Or maybe it's because the jus itself should be clarified before it is used?
      Thanks in advance for your support,
      Tom.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×