• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Anova Jeff

Anova Sous Vide Circulator (Part 2)

479 posts in this topic

So, the expense incurred:

199 USD for the circulator

69.95 USD for shipping and handling to the UK

I did get hit for vat on import as expected - 20%.

I did not get hit for Duty as the total value was too low, but if you're ordering multiple items, you may do, so bear that in mind - the best lookup I could do suggested this would be just above 4%. That was classing it as a water heater - bear in mind I didn't have to test that this was what customs would have applied.

Annoyingly, I also got hit by a fixed charge from the courier company for having to handle the customs clearing - I stupidly left the invoice at work, but it was around 14 GBP. The rest of the charges I understood and it's up to me to decide whether I'm happy or not to place an order, but this was a surprise and left me a little less than gruntled given that the courier was their choice and would clearly be dealing with a cross border shipment, I expected this would be included. It's small, but I will complain about this to Anova.

I'm going to leave my comments on whether I'm happy with the overall cost until I have had a chance to use it a bit more - initial impressions in use are great and temp appears to be spot on, but I am heading to Italy tomorrow and won't be using it for a week. I also have a pet peeve about amazon style reviews after owning products for a couple of hours which I don't wish to resemble.

Hope that helps those considering a purchase for now.

Thanks for posting the total cost.

I make that around £195 not including the £14 surcharge - which is very odd considering you're paying for international shipping and handling.


The Dead Parrot; Built from the ground up by bartenders, for everyone:

Monkey Shoulder Ultimate Bartender Champions, 2015

Twitter

Instagram

Untappd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bad luck. Ordering for Australia post was $72, and at the moment there is no GST or Duty on items here under AUD 1000, but they are about to change the law!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two dumb newbie questions...

Tried to switch to F from C but I can't seem to get to the screen and the silly diagram isn't helping. I thought I saw this in one of the "unboxing" videos but can't quite get there. Hints?

Second question. I remember reading here that the docs came on USB but my unit came with hard copy. I assume they switched to paper but just want to make sure I don't loose something in the unboxing.


Edited by johnelle (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two dumb newbie questions...

Tried to switch to F from C but I can't seem to get to the screen and the silly diagram isn't helping. I thought I saw this in one of the "unboxing" videos but can't quite get there. Hints?

Second question. I remember reading here that the docs came on USB but my unit came with hard copy. I assume they switched to paper but just want to make sure I don't loose something in the unboxing.

Welcome to eG. When you first turn the unit on you should see a screen that offers "Press here to enter system config. Tap to enter. This should bring up a degrees C square. Tap the square to change to degrees F then tap to save and exit. My guess is that if you got a printed manual you will not also have a manual on USB. Hope this helps.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

right, my unit came with ONLY the paper, printed, booklet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first unit came (ordered in August) with a silver usb thumb drive. My original unit was miscalibrated, and its replacement (arrive in late October) came with an orange credit card shaped drive.

I ordered a second unit that arrived this week, it had a printed manual, no thumb drive.

I just completed editing a video showing how I have configured my two Anova units. I will post it here as soon as it has finished rendering and I have uploaded it to YouTube. Hopefully some folks may find it useful/entertaining.


Edited by alanz (log)
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for taking the time to make and post the video Alan, it's excellent and by far the best I've seen.


~Martin

Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist, contrarian and natural born skeptic who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 220v version is working magnificently in its new chillybin/Esky/beer cooler (strike out geographically inapplicable terms). No evaporation I've noticed, and the outer walls stay cool.

Yesterday was my best-ever pork belly (around 11 hours at 78°C), and when that came out I added a couple of litres of cold water to get the temperature down and started some beef short ribs, destined to be tomorrow night's dinner after 48 hours at 54°.

What's was really impressive over the wekend was watching the Anova come to temperature. For the pork belly, it hit 78, wobbled twice back to 77.9 then stabiised really quickly. For the ribs it overshot the target (by a whole 0.1°) and spent a little while alternating between 54 and 54.1 but was rock-solid on 54 when I checked on it this morning.

The sound of the fan/propeller is noticeable - our kitchen is beside the lounge and can't be closed off - but is quite acceptable from the bedroom. And ours is not a big house.

I'm very happy with my Anova. You should get one, too.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The more water Anova has the quieter she is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a lot of common sense people on here have higher standards for patents than currently happen in the US market. My common-sense idea is that you patent a somewhat new idea. Somewhat being decided by a patent office, these standards are extremely low. Heating element+impeller+temp regulator=legal, this has been used by science for a long time. I've worked in science labs that used thermal immersion circulators from many different companies.

Heating element+impeller+temp regulator+housing=patent worthy product?? I don't know about this or the details about patent law, I do know that the US has an industry for patents...the question is if you think this contributes to a common good, is our (cooking) society improved by this. My answer would be no, like I said before this has made me lose all support for Polyscience, let them compete by giving people jobs who can figure out a way to create/market a new device, this may lead to new and better devices instead of new and longer lawsuits

It is not the first time Polyscience is fighting against companies copying the design of their Sous vide professional immersion circulator.

A blogger has already pointed out a similar issue in the past with Vac-star on this page. On the same site you can see a pdf document with equipment comparison with this comment "You may have understood that Creative Series of Polyscience is the SousvideChef v1 rebranded Polyscience. This immersion circulator is now officially made in China."

The problem with Sansaire is the lack of innovation in the product (except the low price) compared to the design of Nomiku and Anova. People should understand it is easy to copy each another (Polyscience for instance) and manufacture a cheap product in China but one day you should be punished for that. My understanding is that Sansaire copied the inside casing design of the Polyscience machine (like Vac-star did). This is probably why Sansaire just informed Kickstarter's backers that the launch of the Sansaire is postponed to January 2014. They have to redesign the mold of the Sansaire or pay fines...

Anyway it is a pity such project is going in that direction. Designing a machine by a 3rd party (mentioned in this video) and being sued for patent infringement is so far away from the original idea of the DIY immersion circulator of Seattlefoodgeek...


Edited by FranzWagner (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

excellent video alanz

this will help many first timers to both SV and Anova.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great video thanks! -- I did have to laugh that I have had the lid on upside down this whole time.... I am definitely interested in seeing the video on how you cut out the cooler -- might just be what I need to get another Anova!

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I'm in Canada and I was ready to order the circulator for my birthday. However, shipping is more the 60$ so it killed my enthusiasm. I've tried to contact the company to see if it was possible to get a cheaper (slower) shipping option, but after sending 2 emails to 2 different adresses I've never received an answer. Now I'm a bit worried about customer service. Has anybody else ordered from Canada?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you might try a call: 281 - 980 - 1236

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind words about the video. When I make a video about cutting the lids, I'll have to show alternate techniques to the one I used (I have a 14" bandsaw that I suspect others do not). So I'll attempt to show using a coping saw, fret saw, or jigsaw to make the cuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One question I was unclear about when I bought my unit was what polycarbonate tub to buy. I went with a 12 quart cambro http://amzn.com/B0001MRUKA which it turns out is a perfect fit for the unit and plenty big enough for a two person household. The only issue was I managed to put an additional crack in the lid while I was cutting it. Their "snap lid" is very flexible but don't be fooled--it is easy to crack if you're not careful. I should have scored it with a utility knife first.


Edited by johnelle (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I'm in Canada and I was ready to order the circulator for my birthday. However, shipping is more the 60$ so it killed my enthusiasm. I've tried to contact the company to see if it was possible to get a cheaper (slower) shipping option, but after sending 2 emails to 2 different adresses I've never received an answer. Now I'm a bit worried about customer service. Has anybody else ordered from Canada?

The shipping to Canada is all in - courier, broker fees, GST etc. It's worth it unless you have a US address to ship to then pick up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's good to know, thanks.

The shipping to Canada is all in - courier, broker fees, GST etc. It's worth it unless you have a US address to ship to then pick up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a video that shows a few configurations I'm using with my Anova units

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h29KEuAFzAA

I'm don't know how to (or if it's possible) to display the video directly in this thread

You're a star, thank you very much for taking the time to do this!


The Dead Parrot; Built from the ground up by bartenders, for everyone:

Monkey Shoulder Ultimate Bartender Champions, 2015

Twitter

Instagram

Untappd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adam,

I do my best to stay off camera... the shy, demure creature that I am <s>

And as a reminder, the new URL for the updated video (not the one you quoted) is

www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTrYNEeH03I


Edited by alanz (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. What a great video! Exceptionally done.

I think it would be nice to see how easy it is to modify a cooler for the Anova. (I just used a box cutter.) But I think everyone should know that it is something that they can do-- and shouldn't be scared away by it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind words about the video. When I make a video about cutting the lids, I'll have to show alternate techniques to the one I used (I have a 14" bandsaw that I suspect others do not). So I'll attempt to show using a coping saw, fret saw, or jigsaw to make the cuts.

Any progress with this 2nd video? I have a cooler lid I want to cut and would love to see how you do it.


Jennifer

Apparently, I have my mom to thank for loving to cook. As she always says, "You should thank me for never cooking. It forced you to learn how!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Greenmonk,

I might get to do it this weekend. I need to get another cooler for the video, and there is an additional feature I want to add to the polycarbonate lid.

My process for the cooler lid will be this:

  • Mark the area that you want to cut out
  • Drill a hole or two in the area that you will cut out
  • Insert the nozzle of a can of expanding foam and try to fill the area around the cutout
  • Let the foam cure overnight
  • Cut the top (this area should now have a foam core) with a coping saw, jig saw, band saw, etc.

Sound reasonable?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By bhsimon
      Anyone tried this?
       
      I'm trying to think of something novel to do for my friends at an upcoming birthday weekend. We are renting a house in the Hunter Valley (Australian wine region) and food is a major component of our weekend. Last time I did fizzy fruit—the grapes and oranges were awesome and everyone enjoyed the unique experience. I want to do something quirky like that again.
       
      The whipping siphon is easy to transport so I'm interested in using it. The siphoned soufflé in Modernist Cuisine, volume 4 page 297, has a chocolate variation that does not require propylene glycol alginate or maltodextrin (I don't have those things in my pantry, yet). That looks like it might be a good one to try. Anyone done that and have some advice for me before I dive in?
    • By bhsimon
      Besides the health concerns, deep frying steak is the best way to get an even colour and crust on steak. In my most recent experiment, I tried the technique of deep frying prior to, and after, cooking the steak sous vide. In the past, I had only fried the meat after it had been cooked.
       
      The meat was veal chops. As can often be the case, the meat was mishandled somewhere along the way. The obvious signs of this were indentations in the surface. This kind of thing makes it tricky to pan fry and get even colour.
       


       
      This soft meat is also tricky to vacuum seal as it can often be further compressed and misshapen in the process.
       
      I was delighted to observe that a short 45 seconds in hot oil fixed both of these issues! I didn't expect that. Nice. The meat plumped up and that indentation was gone. It also held its shape nicely when vacuum packed.
       

       
      Time and temperature matters. The difference can be just a few seconds or degrees. In the next picture, the time was the same but the oil was 20°C hotter for the steak on the left and the crust is noticeably darker. My next experiment will try 30 seconds at 200°C before and after.
       


      The goal is to keep the crust as thin as possible.
       

       
      I hadn't anticipated the secondary benefits of deep frying prior to sous vide. The plumping of the meat and slight firmness made them easy to package and present. I am curious whether anyone has observed this. I am also curious if it would it work in hot water, rather than oil.



    • By Porthos
      I have purchased an Anova circulator. My interest in sous vide is based upon needing to prepare chicken and pork dishes that remain more moist than other cooking methods I have used. This is based upon needing more moistness for my wife. After her bariactric surgery she became sensitive to meat that is not still very moist.
       
      I would like recommendations for some threads to read through to help get me started.
    • By Adamsm83
      So I did a quick search for a SV whole prime rib and everything I found just turned into, "why waste your time? Just roast it!" Which I would generally agree with, but the kitchen I work in only has one oven that can't be tied up long enough to do the prime rib, so I found a couple of recipes out there and I think my recipe will be as follows...
      Cut a 10# prime rib in half and salt and pepper the outside.
      Vaccum seal each 5# roast and SV at 137 degrees for 10hours.
      Remove from the bags. Pat dry, rub all over with roasted garlic puree, chopped rosemary, thyme & pepper.
      Roast in a 500 degree oven until dark brown.
       
      Now here is where things get tricky, I want to hold it under a banquette heat lamp during service and cut to order (like you used to see at every home town restaurant in the 90's) So my questions are, 1, is it safe? I realize that the SV and the oven should be safe, but then it sits out , although under a heat lamp, lets face it, they aren't great. Still if it sits from 5 to 9 and is gone by 9 then its okay to be in the danger zone since it will be gone in 4 hours anyways (assuming we sell out or throw out left overs. 2, what would my expected yield be after SV. I read you have a loss of approx. 20% when roasting, less if its bone-in, so SV w/ bones what are your opinions? And lastly, what are peoples opinions about the flavor profile of SV beef on the bone. 
       
      Other info to consider, i will be using a very fresh, very local beef that is grass fed up to 600# and finished on brewers grains. The meat has a very rich flavor, not overly irony, but still much more "meaty, beefy" flavor than the crap at the super markets. 
      Anyways, I would like to get this thing rolling next week, so any helpful tips, tricks or advice would be much appreciated. Thanks!
    • By Morkai
      I am planning on making Michael Ruhlman's macaroni and cheese this weekend for a party. In the recipe, you make a soubise sauce with flour, butter, milk, and carmelized onions. You hand blend these all together (with some spices), and then add the grated cheese to the hot liquid to melt. Then you can mix in with the cooked pasta and keep overnight in the fridge.
       
      Then I remembered I have sodium citrate in the pantry. 
       
      We like this recipe, but find that it's not as "cheesy" or "creamy" as we'd like it to be sometimes, especially after cooking. Would adding a dash of sodium citrate to the cheese/soubise mixture help keep it that classic cheesy texture? Even if it sat overnight in the fridge and was then baked? As I am making this along with smoking a couple pork butts for my girlfriend's co-workers, I really don't want to have a food disaster! 
       
      Thanks all,
       
      Mork
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.