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Anova Jeff

Anova Sous Vide Circulator (Part 2)

479 posts in this topic

In that case I'd think it would be reasonable for you to pay the first shipping - they won't charge you for the second shipping so you'll be no further behind except for the time you've lost out on not having an Anova to play with.

Every company put out the odd lemon I'd say - just the nature of manufacturing.

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Realised today when I saw a post on their facebook page that they had changed their email address and I had emailed the old one. Not that I'm saying they shouldn't have monitored the old one, but things slip through the cracks...

Anyway, emailed a query on my shipment today and had a reply from Natalie within hours!

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Originally: sousvide@waterbaths.com, which was listed on their website a while back. Received a reply when asking about when the 220V would be available in mid-October, but no reply to my shipment date query placed last week.

Now: help@anovaculinary.com, which was posted on the web page. Answered within hours (and to be fair they were probably sleeping when I sent it).

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What a farce. I sent a message to info@waterbaths.com

I've left a message on a thread on [saving]FaceBook and i will see if they respond there.

Frankly I find $70 for shipping with no allowance for taxes a bit steep.

I Fedex'd a Guitar across the Atlantic that arrived stateside in less than 20 hours (about 16 hours actually, thanks to the time difference) and it cost less than $70.


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Ouch !

I just logged on to Canada Post to see what it would cost to send my unit to my sister in the UK. (An exercise only - it wouldn't work over there.)

$83.27!

No taxes, no duties, no nothing but postage. It seems to me that Anova have little control over the cost of shipping and none whatsoever over customs and excise duties.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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My 220v version seems to be taking a short holiday in Chicago on its way to me - it's been there about three days now, so I hope the weather's nice. I'm sure it passed through San Francisco after leaving Houston but there's no mention of that on the USPS tracking page now. I may be delusional.

I'm not greatly bothered by the shipping (closer to $80 than $70). The thing must weigh a reasonable amount and it's over 30cm long, so it's going to be a reasonable-sized package (particularly if they expect it to survive the trip). The value should be below our threshold for Goods and Services Tax so I won't have to worry about that.


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Yes I'm happy enough with the shipping charge to Australia, especially given the very low cost of the unit, at least by Australian standards.

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My 220v version seems to be taking a short holiday in Chicago on its way to me - it's been there about three days now, so I hope the weather's nice. I'm sure it passed through San Francisco after leaving Houston but there's no mention of that on the USPS tracking page now. I may be delusional.

Chicago had a huge storm on Sunday, so that could be the problem. Although, I am in the burbs of Chicago and have seen stuff shipped from Chicago, sit in Chicago for 3 days as well....

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I did some rib steaks (prime, bone in) this past weekend... sous vide then finished with a butane torch.

Normally I use a 4.5 gallon polycarbonate bin, but I am experimenting with a larger container for an upcoming party.

So I used the Anova mounted in the corner of a 30 quart Coleman cooler. I cut the top (there is no insulation in the top) so the lid fits around the Anova, and filled the gap with foam, makes for a nice fit... it worked perfectly.

I like the idea of having two sous vide setups for the party... perhaps one for eggs, and one for general reheating.

Decisions decisions... not which brand to buy, but which color!!! Isn't it nice to have such first world problems???


Edited by alanz (log)

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Red is best. It always is.

re Colman Coolers: im please to see the Anova will mount in the CC. I have 4 but will get the Anova at some point to supplement the system i now have that's fine.

if you decide to do longer SV's with the cooler, it easy to insulate first with NON-expandable canned insulation with a variety of drilled holes in the empty top. cure then cut for the Anova.

did you "" filled the gap with foam "" after the cut? what foam did you use?

very interested in this. thanks.

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I considered filling with foam before cutting, but I really didn't know what was (or wasn't) in the lid.

I had some "Great Stuff Insulating Foam Sealant for Gaps and Cracks" on my shelf.

It was fine that it expanded, I simply recut after the foam had set.

I then put some Gorilla tape over the foam to act as a moisture barrier... not sure how well that will hold up over time, I will experiment with some other ways of sealing the foam.

I made photos of the finished setup, I'll try posting them soon.

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Here are a few photos I made yesterday.

The sides of the cooler stayed surprisingly cool throughout the cook (132F water, 82F outside wall of the cooler)

The top of the cooler was getting pretty warm (except near the cutout where I added foam).

So I experimented with a sheet of Reflectix I had laying around... it didn't cover the entire surface area, but even this much made the lid much cooler, so I think it's yet another good use of this material (I will cut some to fit).

I didn't make a closeup of the cutout... I'll try to make that photo soon.

Hope this helps.

z3353_1200.jpg

z3354_1200.jpg

z3378_1200.jpg

z3416_1200.jpg


Edited by alanz (log)

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Wow, I haven't seen that reflectix before, I was toying with the idea of hollow polypropylene spheres but they're way too expensive. Now I'm going to get some of this and cut it into diamonds or some other shape (I have my bags hanging in the top of the baths with the narrow side of the bag facing the jet from the anova). Looks like it's good up to 180F, which is pretty much the max I would need for vegetables which wouldn't stay long any way.

I wonder what shape would be best for covering the surface area


Edited by Beusho (log)

“...no one is born a great cook, one learns by doing.”

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I thought of cutting up the Reflectix, but to be honest, two pieces would be all I would do. I don't see any particular reason for small pieces. It's very lightweight, floats, and easy to move out of the way or remove entirely to get at the items in the bath. Take off the lid, place it upside down on a counter, put the Reflectix into the lid. No drips.


Edited by alanz (log)

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Some decisions made easy. My wife said "I want a red one!"

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Black is more elegant and refined.

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I agree, that's why my current unit is black.

Ideally I would like a black body with a red band as my second unit.

Then again, 10 years ago we were buying a MINI Cooper S. I was partial to dark silver with a black roof... she said "I like the red one with the white roof". An hour later, we drove the red one home. Worked out just fine... Making her happy is a fine thing.

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what size cooler is that?

many thanks

like the Reflectix idea.


Edited by rotuts (log)

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It's a Coleman 30 quart cooler. Approximately $25

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how did you cut the top? its a great idea to cut the top first then add the foam insulation .

I did mine the other way around for a different system the SVMagic.

Ill have to retool my 4 coolers when I get the Anova

:biggrin:

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Woodturning is one of my hobbies, and I have a well equipped shop that includes a band saw.

If I didn't have that tool, I would have likely used a jig saw or a coping saw.

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I have a similar setup with a 28 QT igloo cooler I got at Target for $15. Works great. I'll see if I can post pictures later in the week. Anyone can do it. I cut my hole in the lid just using a box cutter (not as elegant as alanz, I'm sure-- but it works without looking like an eyesore). Just mark out your dimensions and cut slowly.

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I like the rack you use to keep the packets in place - where did you get that? It's one of the things I always liked about the SVS.

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