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What Category of Pan is This?


Porthos
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At 4 qts with a diameter of 11 inches the height/Width ratio is a bit different. The pan in the link has a width/height ratio of approx 4.58:1 whereas my pan is 2.78:1. For an engineer such as I that is a fairly significant difference.

In the end it was a curiosity question and the category of pan will not change how much I appreciate it being in my kitchen.

Interesting (at least to me) to note is that on the mfg website this same pan with just 2 short handles is called a 5 qt dutch oven.

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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My copper pan is 10" wide from rim to rim and 4.25" deep. I got it down and measured again, the "working" capacity is 3.75 quarts.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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You're right, Annabelle, you did call it first!

How can it be a Saute pan? "saute" translated from the French is to "jump". With the (pictured) pan's high staight sides, it is very hard to toss/shake small items around--you need lower sloped walls to do that.

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My copper pan is 10" wide from rim to rim and 4.25" deep. I got it down and measured again, the "working" capacity is 3.75 quarts.

So that would give you about 1.5" below the rim, a good level for me.

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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That shape of pan is called a "sautoir", and has been called that in Europe for at least a century. A "Sauteuse" has the bell-shaped sloped sides to aid in evaporation and whisking in ingredients. Why this is called a "saucier" in N.America is beyond me, and I humbly request N.American cookware companies to describe their reasons for doing so.

I'm a European trained chef, and can confirm this. The sauteuse, as defines above is mostly uses for sauces, expecially hollandaise and the likes, because the sloped sides come in handy when whisking everything in the traditional 8-form. The sautoir has straight sides, and we use it often for risotto and the likes, but also for baking meats, because it is easier to pour in some liquid to loosen up all te nice residue.

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  • 1 month later...

That shape of pan is called a "sautoir", and has been called that in Europe for at least a century. A "Sauteuse" has the bell-shaped sloped sides to aid in evaporation and whisking in ingredients. Why this is called a "saucier" in N.America is beyond me, and I humbly request N.American cookware companies to describe their reasons for doing so.

This is correct, and consistent with the descriptions in Larousse Gastronomique and Renard's Les Cuivres de Cuisine. Renard defines 'sautoir' as (in my poor translation): "Casserole a bords peu eleves et fond epais dans lequel le cuisiner fait sauter les morceau de viandes et les legumes. Elle possede un couvercle pour poursuivre la cuisson a four." "A pan with straight short sides and thick bottom in which the cook sautes pieces of meat and vegetables. It possesses a lid for cooking in the oven."

He defines 'sauteuse' as: "Cassreole en cuivre a fond epais, munie d'une queue. Les bords en sont peu eleves contrairement aux casseroles, mais comparee au sautoir, la sauteuse est legerement evasee. Les bords ainsi fabriques permettent de "faire sauter", c'est-a-dire remuer facilement et violemment les ailiments coupes en morceaux pour bien les melanger aux huiles et aromates." "Thick copper pan, provided with a tail handle. The walls are not unlike the other pans, but cmpared to a saute, the pan is slightly flared. The features allow jumping, that is to say easily and violently stir foods cuts into pieces to mix well with oils and herbs."

If someone can do a better translation, I'm all ears.

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