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Jaymes

Christmas Cookies Redux

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21 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

Definitely very close to the top of the list of my favorites! :)

Mine, too.

I'm the opposite of most people, I'm terribly disappointed if I pick what I think is oatmeal raisin and it turns out to be chocolate chip. I'm okay with a chocolate chip cookie occasionally, but usually it won't get eaten after that first bite.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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9 hours ago, chromedome said:

I'm the opposite of most people, I'm terribly disappointed if I pick what I think is oatmeal raisin and it turns out to be chocolate chip. I'm okay with a chocolate chip cookie occasionally, but usually it won't get eaten after that first bite.

 

YES!

And it's happened more than once! :S

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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One of my employees is a cookie monster and almost every day brings back some kind of (commercially baked) cookie at lunch time. Friday it was pannatone cookies, which were plain cookies (too sweet) with raisins and dried orange peel and some other stuff. I did like the orange peel flavor, might be nice to add freshly grated to an oatmeal cookie recipe.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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7 hours ago, BeeZee said:

One of my employees is a cookie monster and almost every day brings back some kind of (commercially baked) cookie at lunch time. Friday it was pannatone cookies, which were plain cookies (too sweet) with raisins and dried orange peel and some other stuff. I did like the orange peel flavor, might be nice to add freshly grated to an oatmeal cookie recipe.

I think that would be great - especially if you subbed dried cranberries for raisins.  

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On 12/14/2018 at 4:24 PM, chromedome said:

Mine, too.

I'm the opposite of most people, I'm terribly disappointed if I pick what I think is oatmeal raisin and it turns out to be chocolate chip. I'm okay with a chocolate chip cookie occasionally, but usually it won't get eaten after that first bite.

I'm allergic to chocolate so I too prefer the cookies with raisins or cranberries or cherries.  I can highly recommend the Dried Amarena cherries in syrup. 

I bought some a year ago and just used the last of them last week. 35 ounces goes a long way.  They are large and I chop them to mix into scones and cookies.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Speaking of oatmeal, I am making a coconut oatmeal cookie this Christmas which I learned about on the Anson Mills website:

 

http://ansonmills.com/recipes/425?recipes_by=grain

 

In the past, I've used very fiery cinnamon to good effect. 

 

I have also used other [more affordable] brands of stone-cut oats; if you're doing that, you're going to want to up the liquid a bit.  I've also made them with regular rolled oats -- I didn't like the result as much, but I admit I can't remember why.  


Edited by SLB (log)
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3 hours ago, SLB said:

Speaking of oatmeal, I am making a coconut oatmeal cookie this Christmas which I learned about on the Anson Mills website:

These do sound very interesting. I have filed away the recipe for future consideration. Thank you. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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6 hours ago, SLB said:

Speaking of oatmeal, I am making a coconut oatmeal cookie this Christmas which I learned about on the Anson Mills website:

 

http://ansonmills.com/recipes/425?recipes_by=grain

 

In the past, I've used very fiery cinnamon to good effect. 

 

I have also used other [more affordable] brands of stone-cut oats; if you're doing that, you're going to want to up the liquid a bit.  I've also made them with regular rolled oats -- I didn't like the result as much, but I admit I can't remember why.  

 

I'm guessing those oats are finer than the steel-cut oats I keep on hand for my morning oatmeal. Probably what I'd know as "Scotch oats," I'd guess.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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1 hour ago, chromedome said:

I'm guessing those oats are finer than the steel-cut oats I keep on hand for my morning oatmeal. Probably what I'd know as "Scotch oats," I'd guess.

Strangely I was intrigued by these “stone cut” oats.  I could find nothing on them other than that provided by Anson Mills. They do not look to me like steel-cut oats. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I can only assume they're what anyone else would call stone-ground oats, since grinding is what stones do. I can't imagine they're got a machine lined with obsidian blades, or anything silly like that.


“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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From reading the website description, it doesn't appear they're a lot different from steel-cut.  As mentioned above, possibly finer. I wonder if one could give steel-cut a whiz or two in the blender and achieve the same effect?

 


Edited by kayb (log)

Don't ask. Eat it.

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Well.  Now that you mention it, I'm quite sure that what I was using was the steel-cut oats.  The ones commonly found at the grocery store. 

 

[I confess that I didn't even notice the whole "stone-cut" thing.  I am duly embarrassed. ]


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Here is the full information about the various types of oats - rolled, steel cut, stone ground   From Bob's Red Mill

I bookmarked this back in November 2011  and I see the article is dated that year.  And that is the last year I made several batches of cookies.

 

I have, in past, experimented with "grinding" steel cut oats  in a blender - actually in the Thermomix, which I no longer have, 

to get the oats more like flour but not like commercial oat flour, which is TOO fine.  I want some texture.  

I made oatcakes which turned out much better than my previous attempts with steel-cut oats.  

There was one recipe in which I used steel cut oats but I steamed them - in my couscous steamer - after I "toasted" them dry in a cast iron skillet.  The flavor was very nutty.  The recipe was for a rolled wafer that was supposed to be cut out in rounds. I just used a pizza cutter and made rectangles.  I would make them again, if I could remember the name of the recipe!

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Thanks for the article, @andiesenji. I know that when I make oatmeal, I prefer Scottish oats to steel-cut/Irish oats, because they turn out creamier and with a nicer texture. But I must admit I've never baked with either, unless it's turning the leftover oatmeal into bread. All my oatmeal cookie etc. recipes seem to specify either old-fashioned or quick rolled oats.

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MelissaH

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On 12/17/2018 at 7:26 AM, MelissaH said:

Thanks for the article, @andiesenji. I know that when I make oatmeal, I prefer Scottish oats to steel-cut/Irish oats, because they turn out creamier and with a nicer texture. But I must admit I've never baked with either, unless it's turning the leftover oatmeal into bread. All my oatmeal cookie etc. recipes seem to specify either old-fashioned or quick rolled oats.

I have never used quick oats in anything.  I like the old-fashioned rolled oats, preferably organic and I've used them with no difficult in recipes that call for quick oats.

I've probably experimented with oats more than any other grain.  I have a "flaker" and at one time bought whole grains and cranked them through the flaker to see how different the results in cooking and baking would be.  Rolled oats weren't that different but at that time (before internet) it was difficult to find flaked barley, wheat, rye and I liked to cook and bake with them.  

I have a recipe for cookies made with rye flakes and raisins that calls for some rye whisky.   I have a couple of recipes that uses barley flakes, ground nuts, one calls for eggnog.  Another includes wheat flakes.  I tried most of the odd ones.

My friends thought I was a nut case but they never turned down my baked goods.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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On 12/18/2018 at 12:43 PM, andiesenji said:

My friends thought I was a nut case but they never turned down my baked goods.

Funny how that works...

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Yes a tad early. I asked my fish guy (incredible man)  today - of the 3 standards I make what do you prefer - he said NOT baklava or Linzer squares but chocolate chip cookies w/ a touch of spice!  ( I use zimmt and Anagostura bitter) Asking can be enlightening. I may pre do and freeze/ Sometimes peeps are over gifted right at holiday so giving maybe just after Thanksgiving can be good and they can use for their gatherings.

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It is nice to pop into freezer and pull out a bag for folks.

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So thought wise it seems people are a little more open to change. As I said my fish guy from Puerta Vallarta, Mexico  is on board  with a bit of sweet spice in a traditional chocolate chip cookie. Citrus zest is always interesting. Bring it in kidds :)

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It might be fun to do shaped traditional cookies wth proper decorative icing.  Anyone? Also I love love Lebkuchen - anyone do it? I buy it but have not made in a bazillion years - with the crackly icing

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I'm always surprised that one of the favorite Christmas cookies is a simple meringue. I color them red and green, and sprinkle with sanding sugar before baking.

 

Because one has a ton of egg whites after making eggnog from @BonVivant's recipe (or was it @ninagluck?). I will say that this year I'm going to cut back on the proportion of PGA. That stuff was potent. And I'm still chuckling about the look I got at the liquor store when I went in asking for Everclear.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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I've secretly made the dough for Jacques Torres' chocolate chip cookies that Mr. Kim requested about two months ago.  The dough is resting now.  I haven't made chocolate chip cookies in years because every recipe I ever tried was ho hum to me.  But if these knock my socks off, I may make them for Christmas.  I always do my peanut butter cookies (one of only two things I actually brag on) and sugar cookies (just sprinkled, not iced - and they are made with Pillsbury dough, so no bragging there), but usually add something else to the mix.  Last year it was my sister's mocha chocolate chips.  And I always buy a tin of Nyacker's gingersnaps - I can't make a gingersnap that perfect, so they do it for me!

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Ooohhh forgpt 'bout meringue. I usually do the mini chocolate chips.  I have gotten my chocolate chips to crisp well so they are faves of some. Still trying to keep down to 3 or 4 types. However, since I can not keep my mouth (just made a ton of new friends) - I think I gotta start. Calamansi is coming into season (old neighbor friend) and the zest is sttunning. The mind reels...

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So I grab the trashman - his choice is chocolate chip as well!!

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