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Hungarian restaurants in Austin?


Luggage386
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I know Austin's not exactly known for its Hungarian restaurants, but my SO and myself are fans of Central European cuisine and are keenly interested in trying one, if there's one out there. I know there was a place in Round Rock called A Taste of Hungary, but it seems to not be a viable organism these days. Does anyone have any suggestions, and failing a Hungarian restaurant recommendation, what are the best Central European restaurants in Greater Austin? Yee-ha.

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Excellent question, L (if I may be so bold).

Didn't there used to be one out on the Lake somewhere?

And, how about Walburg for German? Not exactly middle-European, I know, but still darn tasty.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Welcome, Luggage! Wanna join us for dinner on the 19th? It's Thai this month!! ( See the Austin get-together thread.)

I imagine Fitz may know of the closest eastern European restaurant in this neck of the woods: her SO may know of something, too.....it's probably in Detroit. :sad:

Not a lot of Hungarians in this neck of the woods. But I can tell you how to make goulash...

Keep in touch!

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Luggage - am I correct - you ARE Fitz's SO??? Right???

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Luggage - am I correct - you ARE Fitz's SO???  Right???

Guilty to that -- I suppose I could ask myself about Hungarian restaurants in Austin, but I wouldn't get a satisfactory reply :laugh: . Fitz can make a great chicken paprikash at home, though, so I consider myself lucky in any case. (We wish we could make it to the event on the 19th, as we're both fans of Thai, but we have so much else going on around that time that we're probably going to have to beg off.)

What happened to A Taste of Hungary? The only Hungarian in Austin I know of is the co-owner of Austinuts -- not exactly trad Magyar cuisine, though it has its own charms. I developed a taste for Hungarian food while living in Central Europe (Slovenia, not Hungary; I suppose asking for a Slovene restaurant in Austin is even more unrealistic). :rolleyes:

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There is a relatively new Hungarian restaurant in Pflugerville. I am curious about it since I have not seen any reviews in the Chronicle or the Statesman nor do I know anyone that has been there yet.

The dinner menu looks promising.

European Bistro

111 East Main Pflugerville, TX 78660

(512) 835-1919

Their web site

There might be some decent places in West, Texas. I drive by the city going to Dallas and there seems to be several Czech restaurants. Most look VERY touristy, but maybe there is one gem hidden in the area.

Edited by NewYorkTexan (log)
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Wow: do I ever feel like a doof!

Well, it's an easy mistake to make.

I mean it's not like he brought his 386 pieces of luggage with him when he came to our eGullet dinners or anything. :biggrin:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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There might be some decent places in West, Texas.  I drive by the city going to Dallas and there seems to be several Czech restaurants.  Most look VERY touristy, but maybe there is one gem hidden in the area.

I have a friend that covers 6-man football and drives all over Texas. He has said that once you get off the highway and head into West (of "Czech Stop" fame)--there a lots of good Czech restaurants. I'll have to ask him for names next time I see him.

Challah back!

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There is a relatively new Hungarian restaurant in Pflugerville.  I am curious about it since I have not seen any reviews in the Chronicle or the Statesman nor do I now anyone that has been there yet.

The dinner menu looks promising.

European Bistro

111 East Main Pflugerville, TX 78660

(512) 835-1919

Thank you, Mr. NYT! Hungary has come to Pflugerville, imagine. The dinner menu looks promising indeed (so does the lunch menu, come to that). I wonder if the place is run by the same people who did A Taste of Hungary. There certainly look to be authentic Magyars involved, and I'm glad that a few Czech dishes have found their way into the mix (I prefer Hungarian cuisine to the generally more bland Czech offerings, though Czech desserts can be just as good; both are too heavy for me to be sampling on a regular basis if I know what's good for myself). I'm looking forward to trying the fruit kolaches, among many other things...

By the way, Jaymes, the 386 refers to Slovenia's international dialing code prefix -- not that I really expected anyone to get that one. :raz:

And foodie52, I still think you rule.

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I wish that I had more of my heritage available to me for my cooking - I am half-Czechoslovakian on my father's side. My paternal grandparents both came over from the old country as teenagers around the turn of the century and met in Poughkeepsie, New York. They came from that part of Hungary that became Czechoslovakia - and there are rumors of horse thieves in the bloodline - but then, there are probably those sorts of rumors floating around about all of us. I never met my paternal grandparent, and only met my grandmother once when I was about seven. She had very little English - and I wasn't into cooking then. My father tells the tale of their being so old-country-ish that one year he actually got coal and switches in his stocking. Guess that could have been more of a cautionary fable for me and my sibs.

Edited by memesuze (log)
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I never met my paternal grandparent, and only met my grandmother once when I was about seven.

That is really a shame.

And there's a lesson there about not taking things/people for granted....

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Everyone see John Kelso's column about European Bistro this week? Funny how that happened!

Yes! I loved the line he used about how the new "bistro" is "quaint."

And then compared it to his favorite South Austin dive which, he said, ain't "quaint." And that in fact, "a while back, quaint walked out for a pack of cigarettes and hasn't come back."

That is one priceless line :laugh::laugh::laugh:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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  • 1 month later...

Fitz and I visited European Bistro last Saturday and were, overall, quite pleased. The phrase 'old-world charm' is certainly overused, but it it fits this open, welcoming, slightly old-fashioned (but not stuffy) establishment to a T. We were greeted like old friends by the staff, and took a table in the center of the main hall. Following the waiter’s recommendation, we opted for the pan-fried cauliflower with creamy sauce (something like a well-made mayonnaise) on the side. We were both fond of this, but next time I’ll opt for the mushroom crepe. My main was a chicken paprikash (off the bone) with dumplings that compared favorably with the ones I’d had in Hungary, if a bit less heavy on the paprika than usual. The portion size was perfect. Fitz ordered a stuffed cabbage with smoked Hungarian sausage and artistically cut bacon that sent her into raptures, as it reminded her of the Polish food she’d grown up on (and the stuffed cabbage she prepares herself when special occasions come around).

Service was the only rough patch we encountered. Our waiter (who was friendly and helpful otherwise) left halfway through our meal to ‘take care of some unexpected business at home,’ as the waitress who took over (who I think was his wife) put it; when the bill came, we found ourselves charged for a bottle of Tokaj Aszú, and one extra glass of wine, that we hadn’t ordered. This was soon straightened out, though, and we’re inclined to put it down to a fluke. After the main course, Anni, the charming co-owner, came over and chatted with us (I evidently impressed her with the couple of phrases I know in Hungarian). She’s an excellent saleswoman of desserts (all of which her sister prepares in the kitchen) and we opted to split an Austrian walnut dumpling with vanilla-lemon sauce. Both of us were very happy we did, as we were purring with delight over it in short order. The coffee, as you might expect, is quite good, and they also serve espresso and cappuccino as any proper Hungarian café should.

Wines, which include Hungarian and Romanian selections, were decent but unspectacular, as was the wine list in general – given the difficulty in finding Hungarian wines in Austin outside of the odd bargain bin, I suppose you have to applaud them for trying at all. Next time I might opt for a Czech pilsner to accompany the meal, and buy a bottle of Tokaj Aszú for real this time, to take home.

Our lunch (not including tip) came to $61.70 for two – this included three glasses of wine and two coffees. Lunch prices during the week are lower; you might escape for $40 or so. We thought it was worth it, and we'll be back.

To complete the Central European experience, after our meal we went next door to the Old Prague Market (a gift shop) and bought a Czech crystal doodad to use as the cake topper for our upcoming nuptials.

:smile:

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Luggage - Great Post!

Very thorough. I'll try that place myself soon, I know.

And particularly enjoyed the little bit at the bottom about going next door and buying a Czech crystal doodad for the wedding cake.

Thanks.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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We live about 10 blocks away from the European Bistro in P'ville! We tried it a while back and were not impressed with the food, although the owners were exceptionally nice and accomodating (brought toys out for our 2 young kids, talked with us about the menu and drinks, etc). I wish we had enjoyed our food. :sad: I had the pheasant - dry as a bone. I'm forgetting what DH had. His was better I remember. I see they've now added a childrens' menu - ours just ate off of our plates.

If you are thinking of trying this restaurant, make plans soon. It is in one of those doomed restaurant locations (similar to the restaurant next to Chuy's on Barton Springs - the ex-Cafe de Brazil), and I just don't see European Cuisine, especially at those prices, flying in P'ville. The Indian restaurant at the same location only lasted a month or two. Sopranos was very, very good when it was "on" and horrible otherwise. They lasted maybe a year.

Dining out in P'ville....what a joy! :rolleyes:

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