Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Chris Amirault

Best Baking Cookbooks 2013

Recommended Posts

Every year I like to grab a baking cookbook or two for the house baker/my wife. What are some of the best options out there for 2013? Any eagerly anticipated gems arriving for the end-of-year blitz?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They would: Flour (1) is hit or miss at our house, making Flour 2 less attractive.

Anyone got the skinny on Sebastien Boudet's French Baker?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if bread baking is done, this book is an older gem, now out of print but easily obtained used: two of my copies , one at a time were permanently borrowed so went with Used

Used turned out to be a better copy:

Amazon Link

this is the only way I make bread.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although not a book from this year, without a doubt the best book i have recently purchased is Bread, 2nd Edition, by Jeffrey Hamelman.

As for books for this year, i still dont have, but plan to get the english translation of Macaron by Pierre Herme.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought Bouchon Bakery for my baker/wife and she loves it. There is a ton of fun stuff in here, not really found elsewhere.

http://www.amazon.com/Bouchon-Bakery-Thomas-Keller/dp/1579654355/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1385995211&sr=1-1&keywords=bouchon+bakery

Also, Flour Water Salt Yeast is great.

http://www.amazon.com/Flour-Water-Salt-Yeast-Fundamentals/dp/160774273X/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1385995287&sr=1-4&keywords=flour


Edited by Unpopular Poet (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Sarabeth's, Tartine, and FWSY books look great. (As are the other two: we've already got Hamelman & Bouchon.) Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tartine #3, which focuses on whole grains, releases in early Dec. I've got my copy preordered. Aside from that, 2013 hasn't been such a banner year for baking books. Miscovich's wood fired oven book is wonderful, but rather specialized and not just bread/baking (roasting meats, etc. and plenty on oven construction and management). Man'oushe by Masaad looks interesting, but I have it on my library list and not my purchase list.

If you're looking for specifically French books, I'd get Vatinet's A Passion for Bread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tartine bread Kindle edition is on sale today only for 2.99 on Amazon. May be someone can provide eG friendly link.


Edited by chefmd (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got Tartine #3 in the mail from Amazons prebuy. I would HIGHLY recommend it. If you dont have the two previous books, get those while youre at it as well. Very interesting and on point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got my Tartine 3 too. However, I sent it back this morning.

The book is gorgeous! It is a heavy book. The pages are an excellent quality paper with unique tabs on the bottom of the pages. The recipes, however, are way over my head. I have Tartine 1. I was hoping for more cakes and tea cakes. The Tea cakes in Tartine 3 require a leaven.

I don't bake bread. This book is filled with scrumptious-looking bread pics and recipes. They use whole grains, such as spelt.

As I said, this is a gorgeous book. But for someone on MY level, this is way more difficult than I can handle.

Maybe I will re-buy it someday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My recommendation for a 2013 book would be Standard Baking Co. Pastries.

Amazon Link

Their Blueberry Custard Ricotta loaf is awesome. I haven't made any other recipes in that book because everyone wants me to make that recipe.

I bake only by grams. The books lists ingredients by volume measurement. However, I called the bakery. The people I spoke to were so friendly and helpful. I needed to know the weight of their cup of sifted cake flour. Sara asked one of the authors and I was told it is 100g. My cake was awesome!

Other recommendations are anything by Rose Levy Beranbaum. Though she has nothing new this year, her books/recipes raise the bar and are consistently show-stoppers.

Good luck and Merry Christmas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got Pizza: Seasonal Recipes from Rome's Legendary Pizzarium [Hardcover], by Gabrielle Bonci. Obviously a singular subject book (well, there's more in there), but a must-have for any pizza aficionado.


Edited by weinoo (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      A SANDWICH TO GO
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a snack which you can grab and eat "on the go". I know that it is unhealthy. We should celebrate eating and eat calmly and with deliberation. However, sometimes the day is too short for everything on our schedule and we still have to eat. Admittedly, we can sin and go for some fast food, but it is healthier and tastier to prepare something quickly in our own kitchen.

      Today, Camembert cheese and cranberries in a fresh, crunchy roll take the lead role. It sounds easy and yummy, doesn't it? Try it and get on with your day . Today I used a homemade cranberry preserve which was left over from dessert, but if you like you can buy your own.

      Ingredients:
      2 fresh rolls (your favourite ones)
      150g of camembert cheese
      1 handful of lettuce
      2 teaspoons of butter
      2 teaspoons of pine nuts or sunflower seeds
      preserve
      100g of fresh cranberries
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      100ml of apple juice

      Wash the cranberries. Put the cranberries, sugar and apple juice into a pan with a heavy bottom and boil with the lid on for 10-12 minutes, stirring from time to time. Try it and if necessary add some sugar. Leave to cool down. Cut the rolls in half and spread with the butter. Put some lettuce on one half of the roll. Slice the camembert cheese and arrange it on the lettuce. Put a fair portion of the cranberry preserve on top of the cheese. Sprinkle with the roast pine nuts or sunflower seeds and cover with the second half of the roll.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kasia
      ORANGE CREME BRULEE WITH MILLET GROATS
       
      One of our friends said recently that he doesn't cook for himself. He eats what his wife prepares: sometimes it is something healthy and other times something yummy. It was a joke, of course, because his wife cooks really well, but this sentence is now in our friendly canon of jokes.

      Inspired by our talk about groats, flakes and healthy food, I prepared a dessert which combines excellent taste and healthy ingredients. The original recipe comes from the Lidl cookery book. I would like to share with you my version of this dish. I recommend Crème brûlée with millet groats to everybody who counts calories. It is mild, not too sweet, wonderfully creamy inside and with an incredible crunchy crust on top. That's why we love crème brûlée, don't we? I prepared a cranberry-orange preserve to offset the sweetness of the dessert. The whole dessert looked beautiful and tasted perfect.
       
      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      crème brûlée
      100g of dry millet groats
      350ml of almond milk
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      2-3 tablespoons of brown sugar (3 additional tablespoons for the sugar crust)
      juice and skin from one orange
       
      confiture:
      150g of fresh cranberries
      juice and peel from one orange
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Put the millet groats in a sifter, clean them with cold water and then douse them with hot water. Put the groats, almond milk, sugar and vanilla essence into a saucepan with a heavy bottom. Boil it with the lid on without stirring for 15-18 minutes until the liquid has evaporated. Leave to cool down. Add the orange juice and peel, mix it in and blend until the mixture is perfectly smooth. Put the dessert into small bowls and leave in the fridge for one hour. Wash the cranberries. Add the orange juice and peel and the sugar and boil for 10-15 minutes. Try it and add some sugar if you think the dessert is too sour. Take out the bowls from the fridge. Sprinkle them with the sugar and burn it with a small kitchen burner to make a crunchy caramel crust. Decorate the dessert with a small teaspoon of the cranberry preserve. Serve the rest of the preserve separately in small dishes.
       
       


    • By quiet1
      We have a local Italian bakery my mom loves, but they are very expensive and hard for her to get to. She also really likes cookbooks (she reads them even if she never cooks from them  ) so I was thinking for her birthday I could get her a cookbook that has similar cookies and cakes, and offer to make a few things for her on request also.
       
      I'll obviously look myself, but eGullet is always well informed about the quality of cookbooks so I wanted to know if anyone has any recommendations. The thing about the Italian bakery is that the stuff they make seems to me to be not as sweet as classic American recipes, and often have more complex flavors and also are usually on the light end for whatever the item is. (Like even something that's intended to be dense doesn't have a very heavy sensation in the mouth.)
    • By Dave the Cook
      Modernist Bread is out now, but maybe you haven't taken the plunge. Here's your chance to win your own copy, courtesy of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Cooking Lab has provided us with a couple of other prizes that will go to a second and third winner: second place will win an autographed poster and calendar, and third place will receive an autographed poster. They are also providing an autographed bookplate for the first place winner's copy of Modernist Bread. The rules are simple: we are going to post recipes from the book that the team at The Cooking Lab has graciously provided for this purpose. To enter into the contest, you need to bake one or more of these recipes and post about them in the official contest topics by the end of November 2017. Winners will be drawn at random from those posting pictures and descriptions of their completed loaves. Complete rules and other details can be found here.
       
      For part two, we're featuring another cornerstone recipe from the book: Direct Country-Style Bread. The only leavener here is instant yeast, so production time is considerably shortened. The relative lack of flavor compared to long-proofed doughs is offset by the use of whole grains. Courtesy of The Cooking Lab, here's that recipe (extracted from the book and reformatted for purposes of this contest):
       




    • By MrJonathanGreen40
      One of my friends is leaving for Spain next week, and I’m planning to surprise her with a party before she leaves. Since she’s a huge lover of sweets, I decided to buy her a cake. I don’t know where to start looking, but my brother suggested that I buy from this online provider of custom cakes. I checked their website, and I think they have cakes that my friend will love. I haven’t bought anything yet because I want to be 100% sure that their cakes are truly excellent. Do you have any idea how I should examine cakes through the Internet? What are the things that I must take into consideration? Thanks!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×