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Chris Amirault

Best Baking Cookbooks 2013

15 posts in this topic

Every year I like to grab a baking cookbook or two for the house baker/my wife. What are some of the best options out there for 2013? Any eagerly anticipated gems arriving for the end-of-year blitz?


Chris Amirault

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They would: Flour (1) is hit or miss at our house, making Flour 2 less attractive.

Anyone got the skinny on Sebastien Boudet's French Baker?


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

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if bread baking is done, this book is an older gem, now out of print but easily obtained used: two of my copies , one at a time were permanently borrowed so went with Used

Used turned out to be a better copy:

Amazon Link

this is the only way I make bread.

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Sarabeth's Bakery: From My Hands to Yours

Amazon Link

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There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

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Although not a book from this year, without a doubt the best book i have recently purchased is Bread, 2nd Edition, by Jeffrey Hamelman.

As for books for this year, i still dont have, but plan to get the english translation of Macaron by Pierre Herme.

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I bought Bouchon Bakery for my baker/wife and she loves it. There is a ton of fun stuff in here, not really found elsewhere.

http://www.amazon.com/Bouchon-Bakery-Thomas-Keller/dp/1579654355/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1385995211&sr=1-1&keywords=bouchon+bakery

Also, Flour Water Salt Yeast is great.

http://www.amazon.com/Flour-Water-Salt-Yeast-Fundamentals/dp/160774273X/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1385995287&sr=1-4&keywords=flour


Edited by Unpopular Poet (log)
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The Sarabeth's, Tartine, and FWSY books look great. (As are the other two: we've already got Hamelman & Bouchon.) Thanks!


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Tartine #3, which focuses on whole grains, releases in early Dec. I've got my copy preordered. Aside from that, 2013 hasn't been such a banner year for baking books. Miscovich's wood fired oven book is wonderful, but rather specialized and not just bread/baking (roasting meats, etc. and plenty on oven construction and management). Man'oushe by Masaad looks interesting, but I have it on my library list and not my purchase list.

If you're looking for specifically French books, I'd get Vatinet's A Passion for Bread.

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Tartine bread Kindle edition is on sale today only for 2.99 on Amazon. May be someone can provide eG friendly link.


Edited by chefmd (log)

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Just got Tartine #3 in the mail from Amazons prebuy. I would HIGHLY recommend it. If you dont have the two previous books, get those while youre at it as well. Very interesting and on point.


mise en plase

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I just got my Tartine 3 too. However, I sent it back this morning.

The book is gorgeous! It is a heavy book. The pages are an excellent quality paper with unique tabs on the bottom of the pages. The recipes, however, are way over my head. I have Tartine 1. I was hoping for more cakes and tea cakes. The Tea cakes in Tartine 3 require a leaven.

I don't bake bread. This book is filled with scrumptious-looking bread pics and recipes. They use whole grains, such as spelt.

As I said, this is a gorgeous book. But for someone on MY level, this is way more difficult than I can handle.

Maybe I will re-buy it someday.

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My recommendation for a 2013 book would be Standard Baking Co. Pastries.

Amazon Link

Their Blueberry Custard Ricotta loaf is awesome. I haven't made any other recipes in that book because everyone wants me to make that recipe.

I bake only by grams. The books lists ingredients by volume measurement. However, I called the bakery. The people I spoke to were so friendly and helpful. I needed to know the weight of their cup of sifted cake flour. Sara asked one of the authors and I was told it is 100g. My cake was awesome!

Other recommendations are anything by Rose Levy Beranbaum. Though she has nothing new this year, her books/recipes raise the bar and are consistently show-stoppers.

Good luck and Merry Christmas.

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I got Pizza: Seasonal Recipes from Rome's Legendary Pizzarium [Hardcover], by Gabrielle Bonci. Obviously a singular subject book (well, there's more in there), but a must-have for any pizza aficionado.


Edited by weinoo (log)

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