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Sous vide tofu


bonkboo
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I am not sure why you want to take the trouble of doing that. What end result are you trying to get?

Medium, medium rare, rare tofu?

What kind of tofu? silken, soft? firm? extra firm?

dcarch

Not entirely sure what I'm after. We use a fair amount of firm tofu. This just popped into my head and I thought this would be a good place to get some thoughts/advice. I guess I was thinking that my idea would be kind of like baked tofu.

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Not entirely sure what I'm after. We use a fair amount of firm tofu. This just popped into my head and I thought this would be a good place to get some thoughts/advice. I guess I was thinking that my idea would be kind of like baked tofu.

I'm pretty sure you'd lose the concentrating effect you get from baking. I guess if you wanted it to keep it's...erm...how to put it...custardy..? texture, it would work.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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I can see this method can achieve interesting results that you can't get the normal way.

Various stuffed tofu recipes.

For instance, seafood stuffed tofu. You don't get totally overcooked seafood stuffing.

Medium rare beef tenderloin with truffles, stuffed tofu---WOW!

dcarch

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As tofu doesn't really take to marinades, this seems like a great way to get a lot of flavor into the tofu. The dish I served above was amused of just a simple cube of the seared tofu with a chaser of a lime supreme in lemongrass/basil/mint oil. The tofu was good, but a little grainy. It looked like the TG started to react and set before I even poured it out of the blender, so I'd try a little cooler temp next time, especially if I had a little longer to let it set. The silken tofu turned out a little smoother. It holds together enough to slice but definitely a little more fragile. Came home from my soccer game last night and made a sandwich of Swiss cheese, fried egg, slice of bacon and a slab of curry tofu drizzled with the triple herb oil. Not fine dining, but it was a damn tasty sandwich.

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  • 1 year later...

bonkboo, the temp is 180 for about 30 minutes.  You should press the water out of the firm tofu before putting it into the vac bag.  A common approach is to then dry off the tofu, and broil it in the oven or deep fry in the wok after coating it with cornstarch.  

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