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Dave Hatfield

French Pastry Chefs

1 post in this topic

I'm no kind of pastry chef or even a particularly keen pastry eater. (I tend towards the savoury rather than the sweet.), but I thought this article by the BBC would be interesting to all the eG pastry chefs.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-24609525.

Nice to see innovation.

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