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Shel_B

2013 Christmas presents for the cook and the kitchen

128 posts in this topic

Yours are probably tin. Nickel hasn't really been a popular lining metal, and if you got them in France in the '80s then they were tin. I think it is great stuff. Both tin and stainless linings have advantages. Stainless won't melt, tin doesn't stick. Some people are partisans, I am not. The melting feature of tin is what kept it from being widely used in skillets. Tin has a low melt point, too low for hot cooking in most instances, so those pans were carbon steel and now, in most good restaurants, mainly nonstick.

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"" if you got them in France in the '80s then they were tin. ""

well, they are not tin. they are nickel. nothing probable about it.

Lets review: 1) were you there? 2 ) were you even born? 3) can you actually be that !#)#%$_^@(#$^#?

I guess so.

I do have some pans which i did not mentions three sauciers that are tin lined. and hammered never use them.

hammering stopped as it caused deafness. :raz:

you could, look closer at the Pan

Or Not.

:raz:


Edited by rotuts (log)

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So one of you recommends copper skillets and one of you does not. I am looking at the SS ones.

But copper saucepans aren't good because they will heat up everything in the kitchen?


Edited by Robenco15 (log)

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No No NO.

the sauce pans :

http://eshop.e-dehillerin.fr/en/sauce-pan-iron-handles-lined-stainless-steel-14-cm-xml-243_270-1204.html

are not the way to go.

this is my favorite pan:

http://eshop.e-dehillerin.fr/en/round-frying-pan-iron-handle-stainless-steel-interior-26-cm-xml-243_270-1224.html

of course, if I were you Id take get one of these for the future:

http://eshop.e-dehillerin.fr/en/copper-inox-induction-copper-xsl-243_269.html

Im sorry to say I do not have any. But Id love one or two to try.

you might ask when they stopped selling 'tin lined' pots or not

:cool:

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"" if you got them in France in the '80s then they were tin. ""

well, they are not tin. they are nickel. nothing probable about it.

Lets review: 1) were you there? 2 ) were you even born? 3) can you actually be that !#)#%$_^@(#$^#?

I guess so.

I do have some pans which i did not mentions three sauciers that are tin lined. and hammered never use them.

hammering stopped as it caused deafness. :raz:

you could, look closer at the Pan

Or Not.

:raz:

I don't see the reason for your odd rants, your accusations about my age, your requests for pictures (of what?) If they are nickel, great, they are nickel. I am only speaking from my experience trying to help by suggesting that somebody look other than at skillets when considering copper since they were never really made for high level cooking other than in the dining room.

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sorry. you continue to be mistaken.

mine are and were. and continue to be for High Level Cooking. and im sorry i did not indicate the pictures I was looking for were not from you.

MY Bad.

this is an odd rant:

"" if you got them in France in the '80s then they were tin. ""

very odd.

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Enjoy your forum, Gresham's law remains in full effect.

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"" if you got them in France in the '80s then they were tin. ""

well, they are not tin. they are nickel. nothing probable about it.

Lets review: 1) were you there? 2 ) were you even born? 3) can you actually be that !#)#%$_^@(#$^#?

I guess so.

I do have some pans which i did not mentions three sauciers that are tin lined. and hammered never use them.

hammering stopped as it caused deafness. :raz:

you could, look closer at the Pan

Or Not.

:raz:

I don't see the reason for your odd rants, your accusations about my age, your requests for pictures (of what?) If they are nickel, great, they are nickel. I am only speaking from my experience trying to help by suggesting that somebody look other than at skillets when considering copper since they were never really made for high level cooking other than in the dining room.

I'm with you for the most part.

I don't understand why you recommend against copper skillets with SS lining (2.5mm copper). Won't it heat up quicker and retain heat better than any other material? And any other skillet I'd be interested has stainless steel lining.

I am not interested in tin lined pans as retinning is not something I'm interested in having to do. Thanks for your advice!

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my pans from the '80's were nickel lined. im guessing that changed to SS at some point SS is fine.



get the pan i recommended.:



the one you see in the pic. above. i love it.



if you still have some funds, consider the 'dual purpose' pans that have copper and work both on Induction and gas/electic/



also the



http://eshop.e-dehillerin.fr/en/stewpan-with-lid-two-bronze-handles-interior-stainless-steel-24-cm-xml-243_270-1201.html



mine is 9 1/2 " diameter by 5 " deep



if you still have funds: the future is in the induction with some copper in them.



still flush? go have a nice dinner.



not done yet?



the larger 'fry pan' the larger "stew-pan"



go for induction capable.



Id do that now.



Edited by rotuts (log)

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Robenco15

if you go back to D's would you consider taking a few snaps?

Id love it ( mostly )

:biggrin:

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Robenco15

if you go back to D's would you consider taking a few snaps?

Id love it ( mostly )

:biggrin:

oooooooooooh. I'm sorry. Now I understand. I went to their website and put items in the online shopping cart and went through to see how much it would all cost with shipping. I didn't actually go to the store. Sorry about that. Wish I went to the store.

Is the only reason you are recommended the induction models because then I can use them for gas stovetop and induction? I don't really ever plan on having induction stovetops, or whatever they are.

Why do the saucepans heat up your kitchen but the other copper pans don't? I was really set on copper saucepans.

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"" I don't really ever plan on having induction stovetops ""

nether did I. But I Grew Up. have only a single induction plate. thanks to the Lunch Ladies.

the heavy copper sides of the sauce pans radiate a lot of heat to the kitchen rather than to the innards of the Pot in question.

it takes 'forever' for those pots to heat 'boil' water for that reason. the skillet has much shorter sides. Anyone with one of these

tall stock pots better have some time on their hands and a few $$ for their energy bill. remember these are stunning but historical items:

Free Copper, Free Energy, Cheap Help Eager Co-Workers in the Kitchen for clean up ...

I still love them and am great-full I have them. the 'casserole' pot is used on the top of the stove for browning then goes into the oven so not too much loss there on those tall-ish sides.

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So, Shel...are you having fun yet? :-)

I haven't seen you express interest in something like a dehydrator, but given the produce in your area I'll throw that out for consideration.

With regard to the copper pan (I'm almost sorry to bring it up): remind us what kind of heat source you have? If electric coils or radiant heat, the copper may not make much of a difference except looking pretty. If you're using flame, which has nearly instant variability, then copper may make some sense.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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So, Shel...are you having fun yet? :-)

I haven't seen you express interest in something like a dehydrator, but given the produce in your area I'll throw that out for consideration.

With regard to the copper pan (I'm almost sorry to bring it up): remind us what kind of heat source you have? If electric coils or radiant heat, the copper may not make much of a difference except looking pretty. If you're using flame, which has nearly instant variability, then copper may make some sense.

Yeah Shel, sorry what happened to this thread. Smithy brings up a good point. I may be looking at copper pans but since I currently have electric coils there is no way I will be buying any copper until I get a gas stovetop.

I posted a reply in your All Clad thread that you saw so maybe that was helpful in this discussion! Regardless, sorry this thread got hijacked.

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It does not matter what your heat source is, cooper will cook more evenly and faster than all other metals, including aluminum. Silver can be better, if they can make silver cookware.

Copper cannot heat up your kitchen more than other metals. Your stove does. How hot your kitchen gets is dependent on how many BTUs your stove puts out. Cooking with copper will keep your kitchen cooler because it uses heat more efficiently.

dcarch

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Robenco15

great site, thanks

dcarch

you are indeed correct that its the heat source that heats up the kitchen my point about the heavy cooper pots is they take longer to heat up their contents as they radiate more heat to the kitchen than other pots w less conductive sides. the side do not entrain any heat from the stove, they give it up.

cool kitchen think induction top.

ed: meant pots. with the thick copper sides. my 7 1/4 " (Circ) x 4 " used to be used for cooking and mashing potatoes etc. its 2320 grams. the side do add energy to the water, they also loose a lot of energy to the environment.

the cheap inexpensive IKEA pot of the same volume now does this work on the induction plate. it gets the potatoes to temp very quickly. its true the sides eventually reach equilibrium with the water. but time to bring that water " to the boil " one pot vs the other is quite different. the copper on is still a joy ( of sorts ) to use. the IKEA much less so. but Im after the pots contents sometimes. toot sweet.

more so in a cold kitchen.


Edited by rotuts (log)

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Forget France. Forget Amazon. And forget Mauviel. This is where I will be purchasing my copper cookware - http://www.previninc.com/shop/index.html

Mauviel Fry Pan and the rest Matfer Bourgeat. In a year or so...

I like the site Robenco15 -- but for the fry pan, I'm really liking the French Black Steel


Its good to have Morels

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French Black Steel

its on my list. and it can be 'conditioned'

the pan i enjoy so much is only good and at its best for a few things. It's never established detente with eggs. and its from

France !

( at least in my hands )

I think PB is correct:

something like this;

http://www.amazon.com/DeBuyer-Mineral-Element-Frypan-Round/dp/B00462QP0W/ref=pd_sim_sbs_k_1

requiring loving care. it likes eggs ( eventually ) its web site says, or at least might get a long with them. and might be partial to Induction too.

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Forget France. Forget Amazon. And forget Mauviel. This is where I will be purchasing my copper cookware - http://www.previninc.com/shop/index.html

Mauviel Fry Pan and the rest Matfer Bourgeat. In a year or so...

I like the site Robenco15 -- but for the fry pan, I'm really liking the French Black Steel

I have never heard of that French Black Steel before. It looks interesting but I'm pretty set on the copper. I like the Mauviel compared to the Matfer Bourgeat because of the handle and the size. The closer to 12 inches the better.

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Now I don't know if I like the Matfer Sauteuse or the Falk Sauciere. I also see that on that site (Previn), the capacity listed for the Matfer sauteuse at 3.2 quarts differs from other online retailers (they say 2.75 quarts). I want at least 3 quarts for my sauciere. But the Falk is 2.5mm thick, TOTAL. It is 2.3mm of copper and .2mm of stainless steel. No idea if that matters but the Matfer Bourgeat is listed at 3.1mm thickenss (even if that is total, I'm sure there is at least 2.5mm of copper). The sauteuse thing is weird, I really like the look of the Falk, but losing out on copper thickness troubles me.

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you wont notice those thickness differences. you will notice how the handle relates to the balance of the pot : one will feel better to you as you use it over the other

but its probably impossible to get a feel for both pots at the same time.

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Yeah and actually, if Mauviel says it is 2.5mm thick, then it probably is 2.3mm of copper since you the stainless steel has to account for some part of the thickness. The Matfer Bourgeat seem to be the only ones whose copper is thicker....

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Yeah and actually, if Mauviel says it is 2.5mm thick, then it probably is 2.3mm of copper since you the stainless steel has to account for some part of the thickness. The Matfer Bourgeat seem to be the only ones whose copper is thicker....

I don't recall if I specifically checked Mauville, but I did check a couple-three other brands of stainless lined copper pots, and while they did say the thickness was 2.5, closer examination of the specs indicated that the copper was 2.3mm and the stainless was .2mm.

One site said that all stainless/copper comes from the same source, and that it all meets the same specs.

FWIW ...


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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