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merstar

Can I remelt chocolate truffles to make a sauce?

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I have a box of truffles that are good, but not great - my homemade ones are much better. So, I want to make something out of them.

I don't want to use them to stick inside molten chocolate cakes or chocolate cupcakes, so I was wondering what would happen if I remelted them over a double boiler. I checked online, and couldn't find any information. Would they be totally ruined if I remelted them to make a sauce? If they can be remelted, should I add a little cream and/or butter?

Edited by merstar (log)

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With truffles you are dealing with two different things. The outside is typically pure chocolate. That of course could be remelted without issue. The inside however is typically a ganache of some sort. That isn't something you can just melt down and reuse.

If you really want to try this, I would heat it just enough so that the shells become soft and try blending it all together with an immersian blender. This will basically give you a ganache that has more chocolate than it needs and you could maybe use that as a filling for your own truffles, but even then I have no idea what that would taste like or what the shelf life would be like.

Actually, the more I think about this, the more I think it's a horrible idea. The truffles you have now have a limited shelf life from when they were made. You melting them down will not increase that shelf life. Plus you don't like them as is and whatever you make from them isn't going to be all that much better than what they are now.

My advice is to either eat them as is, give them away, or worst case just toss them. Then just start fresh with ingredients you really like and go from there. The key with truffles is to start with very high quality ingredients that you really like. If you start with something you don't care for, there's not much you can do. But that's just my thoughts on it. Good luck and let us know how it turns out if you try to melt them down.

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Actually, I went ahead and melted them with a little heavy cream, and it resulted in a beautiful, smooth sauce. I added a tsp vanilla extract, and the sauce tasted delicious - way better than the original truffles.


Edited by merstar (log)

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If they have a ganache center - melting and adding some cream will just give a nice liquid ganache that could be used as a sauce - just like you did! Well done!

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Thanks, Kerry! I couldn't believe how great it turned out - I kept spooning it out of the bowl to taste, and had to force myself to stop! After all, I need to save some to pour over vanilla ice cream!


Edited by merstar (log)

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