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nelson87

"Sauces & Shapes: Pasta the Italian Way" by Oretta Zanini de Vita and Maureen B. Fant

11 posts in this topic

That does look like a swell book! I've just been admiring the lively writing style and the well-turned phrases in the Kindle preview on Amazon. (Alas, a typo jumped out at me in the second paragraph: "ravelled sleave of care" in an otherwise lovely sentence.) I can see this cookbook in my future, despite the fact that I'm currently weeding my collection because I Have Too Many Cookbooks. It promises to be a treat to read and an education in the kitchen.

Nelson87, your copy should have arrived by now. Do let us know what you cook from it, and how you like it!


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Book arrived today. I was a bit apprehensive, Will Oretta bless my Kitchenaid pasta roller, dough hook and Cuisinart? She Does!!!

Recipes are clear and, thankfully, include metric weights.

One caveat, I see only two recipes for pasta an egg and water and flour doughs.

Nelson87

Southern Connecticut

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Correction::: They are other pasta recipes in this tome. This is a very informative book.

Nelson87

SouthernConnecticut

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Ah, so it seems to live up to its promise! The Amazon preview feature is a lovely and enticing element of their web site, isn't it?


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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That does look like a swell book! I've just been admiring the lively writing style and the well-turned phrases in the Kindle preview on Amazon. (Alas, a typo jumped out at me in the second paragraph: "ravelled sleave of care" in an otherwise lovely sentence.) I can see this cookbook in my future, despite the fact that I'm currently weeding my collection because I Have Too Many Cookbooks. It promises to be a treat to read and an education in the kitchen.

Nelson87, your copy should have arrived by now. Do let us know what you cook from it, and how you like it!

Not a typo! It's Shakespeare. Macbeth.


Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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That does look like a swell book! I've just been admiring the lively writing style and the well-turned phrases in the Kindle preview on Amazon. (Alas, a typo jumped out at me in the second paragraph: "ravelled sleave of care" in an otherwise lovely sentence.) I can see this cookbook in my future, despite the fact that I'm currently weeding my collection because I Have Too Many Cookbooks. It promises to be a treat to read and an education in the kitchen.

Nelson87, your copy should have arrived by now. Do let us know what you cook from it, and how you like it!

Not a typo! It's Shakespeare. Macbeth.

Oh, good! I didn't recognize the Elizabethan spelling. I'm relieved to know that such a simple error was, in fact, mine.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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That does look like a swell book! I've just been admiring the lively writing style and the well-turned phrases in the Kindle preview on Amazon. (Alas, a typo jumped out at me in the second paragraph: "ravelled sleave of care" in an otherwise lovely sentence.) I can see this cookbook in my future, despite the fact that I'm currently weeding my collection because I Have Too Many Cookbooks. It promises to be a treat to read and an education in the kitchen.

Nelson87, your copy should have arrived by now. Do let us know what you cook from it, and how you like it!

Not a typo! It's Shakespeare. Macbeth.

Oh, good! I didn't recognize the Elizabethan spelling. I'm relieved to know that such a simple error was, in fact, mine.

You are most gracious. It was a battle with the proofreaders too. I knew I was taking a chance with the phrase, but I love it.

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Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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OK, I couldn't stand to wait any longer. My copy is on the way; I won't likely have time to actually cook from it for a few weeks, but I expect to love the writing. I may keep a copy of Shakespeare's plays close to hand while I'm at it. ;-)


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I've now started into Pasta the Italian Way. The first section is Last-Minute Sauces:

"All the sauces in this section can be made with ingedients you probably already have in your kitchen -- no extra shopping needed if you've stocked your larder with a few good Italian staples."

The first recipe is Sugo con la bottarga di tonno o muggine. Maybe I have led a sheltered life, however I had never heard of bottarga, and I've read a number of Italian cookbooks. Yes, I notice bottarga is available on amazon. But still not a recipe for me to satisfy a craving in the middle of the night.

This small criticism aside, it is a beautiful book and I think I'll learn a lot.

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The editor and I were amazed that the sales force liked the bottarga picture for the cover, but apparently bottarga is now mainstream. When I saw Martha Stewart recipes for bottarga, I understood that things had progressed while my back was turned. In any case, I'll grant you most people probably don't already have it (yet), but it actually is perfect to keep in the fridge for last-minute meals.


Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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