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Sous vide Beef Bourguignon


Samo154
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For well-done and falling apart like a traditional braise: 58°C/6-12h and then 78°C/2-4h; or 58°C/6-12h, then sear and continue with traditional braising.

(At 58°C the thin collagen sheaths surrounding the muscle fibers will be gelatinized, so they can't shrink and squeeze juices out of the muscle fibers when temperature is subsequently raised above 60°C to thermally hydrolyze thicker collagen parts like tendons and fasciae.)

This is why I mentioned 58C (136F) not causing meat to be fall-apart tender even after 48 hours.

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however:

"For well-done and falling apart like a traditional braise: ..... or 58°C/6-12h, then sear and continue with traditional braising."

:biggrin:

sorry could not resist

:huh:

NP, I missed that. Must have skimmed over the sear part and assumed it was sear then serve. Not sure why if your going to braise traditionally, that you would even bother SV at 58C for the first 6-12 hours. Might aswell just braise traditionally the whole time.

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I think the point for consideration is that the first step might prevent the traditional contraction of the meat at higher temps that

results in that dryness many stews suffer from, and therefore are 'better' the next day when some Jus migrates back into the meat.

I trust PG. for me and my SV use, i might make up a bunch of meat, SV up to first stage, chill / freeze then bring back out later for a

finishing in a traditional-ist manner: Id be getting that wonderful aroma etc that SV seems to consistently miss.

I really can't wait to try this. next time sirloin tips are on sale, a bunch is going into this Experiment.

Thanks again , PG!

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I made this beef bourguignon last night and had no problems whatsoever and it was really terrific. I omitted the pearl onions just because I bought the ingredients before I found this recipe. I used dried porcine mushrooms only and the soaking liquid. It adds a distinct flavor. I’m having it again tonight.

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  • 2 years later...

Cooking tough meats sous vide:

Here are a few useful links:

Douglas Baldwin's Practical Guide to Sous Vide Cooking, Tough Meat

The wikiGullet Sous Vide page, Cooking Tough Proteins

The topic "Pot Roast Recipe?"

The topic "Technological Cooking"

 

In a nutshell:

 

For medium-rare and fork-tender like tenderloin: 55-57°C/48h (thick tendons may escape enzymatic hydrolyzation)

 

For well-done and falling apart like a traditional braise: 58°C/6-12h and then 78°C/2-4h;  or 58°C/6-12h, then sear and continue with traditional braising.

(At 58°C the thin collagen sheaths surrounding the muscle fibers will be gelatinized, so they can't shrink and squeeze juices out of the muscle fibers when temperature is subsequently raised above 60°C to thermally hydrolyze thicker collagen parts like tendons and fasciae.)

 

The above link to the wikiGullet will display a blank page, as wikiGullet is no longer being maintained. You find a copy of the page here:

The wikiGullet Sous Vide page, Cooking Tough Proteins

Peter F. Gruber aka Pedro

eG Ethics Signatory

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