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VacuVita vacuum storage container


Caruso
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Has anyone seen the ads for this not yet released product? Essentially an electric bread box that automatically vacuum seals whenever you open or close it. The design looks great but I'm skeptical that I'd get much value out of the main container. Could you put other things in it in addition to bread? And could you really put different things in it without smells/flavors mixing? It does look really cool though.

http://vacuvita.com/shop/crowdfunding

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I experimented with something similar. In terms of maintaining freshness, bread staled at a significantly slower rate than when wrapped in cloth and stored in a plastic bag. Unfortunately, the bread had a tendency to mould, which is a problem I've virtually never encountered before. This is partly attributable to the fact that the box was only opened once every 24 hours, when my boyfriend made breakfast and sandwiches for his packed lunch. On the other hand, if the box was being opened frequently enough to allow ventilation/moisture buildup, I'd guess that keeping the food under vacuum wouldn't make much, if any difference.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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I am a little surprised, may be by my incorrect understanding of science.

1. As I understand, when you use normal vacuum packing for freezer, it is really not vacuum that is the reason, because that is not a vacuum that you have created. All you are doing is to move as much air as possible to have the plastic making direct contact with the food to prevent water from sublime away (freezer burn). The package is still at normal atmospheric pressure.

2. Some of you may be familiar with playing with vacuum. If you place water in a vacuum, water will quickly start to boil at room temperature and quickly evaporate away.

It would seem to me that if you put bread in a vacuum chamber, the bread will first burst, then it would not take long for the bread to be completely dried out, and some fruits to explode. Check youtube marshmallow in vacuum and see what happens.

dcarch

Edited by dcarch (log)
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I cant imagine this vacuum being very 'complete'

if 'vacuum' sealer do anything to prolong "freshness" they remove most of the oxygen in the system that is being sealed.

you are correct that removing most of the air for SV prevents ice crystals than internally then damage the bag, but this requires a bag that is fairly thick in relative terms: 3.5 MIL

I only know this as America's test kitchen a few years ago reviewed freezer bags. Long term for their studies required a thicker bag than FoodSaver, and not zip lock.

re Bread: many people bake here. the issue for 'stale' bread is the oxygen that you beat into the dough with prolonged kneading.

Ive mentioned in the past this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Bread-Ever-Charles-Over/dp/0767900324

i only know about this as it was part 3 of the DVD that came with a new Cuisinart about 10 + years ago:

in essence: you mix you dough in a Cuisinart or other food processor for 45 seconds.

I used to bake 'free range' ie non-molded sourdough this way and it lasted 'fresh' for over 10 days. sitting on the counter.

it might have lasted longer, but I ate it !

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  • 1 year later...

An ad for this showed up on the NYT's website this morning, so the product appears indeed to have made it to market.  To be clear, I am NOT in any way recommending or endorsing the machine.  In fact, I can't imagine wanting one.  But I figured it might be of interest to some folks in a general "what's new" sense.  Here's the website, main product page with specs here.  Basically, it's a rigid box which automatically pulls a partial vacuum (strength not disclosed) when the lid is closed.  Base unit goes for $200, a little more ($229) to add accessory containers and bags.  Internal capacity, 2 gal / 8 litres (linear internal dimensions not given).  Outside dimensions, 18.5x11.8x8.2 inch / 47x30x20.8 cm.  Direct sales only; up to a three month lag until shipment.  Twelve month warranty.  Only shipping at this time to Netherlands (where the company is based), U.S. and U.K.

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I use Vacucraft containers to store my bread.    Amazon does not appear to carry the set I bought which includes a large and small rectangular containers, and large and small round containers, though here is one set http://www.amazon.com/Vacucraft-4-Piece-Cylinder-Vacuum-Container/dp/B009BGV2EC/ref=sr_1_7?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1443357301&sr=1-7&keywords=vacuum+container   I wrap the bread in plastic before I put it in the container and think it stays fresh longer.  The containers are small, so I have to slice the bread into large pieces first, and I do find that it develops mold pretty quickly - usually within 6 days, even for sourdough leavened doughs.

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Barry, that's the same concept but a different execution.  (And a different manufacturer.)  The Vita is a self-contained unit, rather than fussing with tubes and ports.  It also supports that technology, but the main box is larger and easier to use.  Also, much more expensive.

 

Personally, I find it much easier just to freeze bread.  But obviously there are folks who prefer the vaccum strategy.

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