Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Dinner! 2013 (Part 5)


patrickamory
 Share

Recommended Posts

@C. sapidus....

That looks great!

You can't go wrong with BBQ!

Southern Tier Brewing Company....are you a southern tier resident?

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

attachicon.gif2013_10_19 Dinner quail.JPG

Broasted quail. Pan fried corn-off-the-cob. Roasted acorn squash and peppers. Corn cakes. Jus.

Broasted is a trademark infringement unless you made it in a genuine Broaster. Looks great though illegal.

Ponying on gfweb's comment - Mitch can you tell us what you mean my the term in this instance?. Members have been posting a good bit of quail and my craving has reached lift-off status.

Wow - I never knew that about the Broaster. Since I don't have access to a grill, the quail were marinated (olive oil, garlic, S&P, herbs) and then were simply broiled in my oven. I left them in the oven for a few minutes after they had browned under the broiler, so decided to call them broasted!

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@C. sapidus....

That looks great!

You can't go wrong with BBQ!

Southern Tier Brewing Company....are you a southern tier resident?

DiggingDog - thanks! I looked up Southern Tier brewing company and, to my surprise, they are in New York. We are in Maryland, home of pit beef, but I prefer to BBQ pork.

To keep on topic, for tonight's dinner Mrs. C will be attempting to make Scottish eggs with quail eggs. Looking forward to it, and will post a pic if successful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An Asian friend gave me this recipe last spring and I have been wanting to try it ever since. It's Caramelized Oxtails. Caramelized sauce is butter, shallots, garlic, jalapeno, sweet soy sauce and beef broth. It has not been garnished yet but will be with green onions and lemon juice.

Norm: Caramelized then braised in the broth? A little more info', please?

  • Like 1

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An Asian friend gave me this recipe last spring and I have been wanting to try it ever since. It's Caramelized Oxtails. Caramelized sauce is butter, shallots, garlic, jalapeno, sweet soy sauce and beef broth. It has not been garnished yet but will be with green onions and lemon juice.

Norm: Caramelized then braised in the broth? A little more info', please?

I sent you the recipe. The oxtails were simmered then caramelized with the sauce.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Basquecooks pictures of cassoulet made me miss my mom's Southern cooking so I went looking for some ham hocks. I didn't find any but did find some nice meaty ham shanks. I made them with brats, collards and navy beans. I still have time to make some cornbread for supper tonight.

DSCN0827_zps60df1ec7.jpg

And the cornbread. Next to it are some vanilla buttermilk cupcakes made yesterday.

DSCN0828_zps76198571.jpg

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Working on an Appetizer:

I made an Oregano Tangerine Balsamic vinaigrette to go with:

Scallop/Black Garlic/ Pink Sea-salt and A nice Blk pepper served with oregano butter crouton !!

Paired with an Italian native Grape from Angoris " Ribolla Gialia "

10389614304_5910afc8f9_h.jpg

  • Like 5

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Soo PB: you have a scallop source?

big bummer for me I do not ie fair price for good scallops.

Id like to ask you to moove back to big Beef. Mooooooo that , as much as Id like to try pales

by my addiction to Scallops.

Moooooooooo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's getting cooler and darker here so I pulled out the unglazed tagine and improvised a highly unauthentic chicken with habaneros, cayenne peppers and olives:

chicken_tagine_habaneros_zps52f58137.jpg

Recipe: I gently warmed a quarter-cup of olive oil in the tagine over a flame tamer on medium heat. Sauteed minced garlic, minced orange habanero and minced medium-hot long Indian green chile until garlic changed color. Added a mixture of 1 tsp each ground cumin, black pepper, sweet paprika, and 1/2 tsp each ground Ceylonese cinnamon and Indian medium-hot dried red chiles, and sauteed briefly. Then a couple tablespoons tomato paste and sauteed for a bit. Added 3/4 cup hot water and 1/2 tsp salt, brought to a boil, added 3 chicken thighs and a big long green cayenne pepper, quartered the long way. Brought to a boil again, then covered simmered for one hour, turning chicken halfway, adding olives about 10 minutes before the end. Removed thighs and crisped them in 450-degree oven. Meanwhile removed olives and peppers from sauce, boiled it down in a saucepan, degreased. Returned everything to tagine for another 10-minute simmer, followed by 5 minutes sitting off heat, covered.

I'd say it was a pretty unqualified success - I wish I'd had better olives and only added them at the end. And I think pimenton de la vera would have added a nice smokiness in place of, or in addition to, the sweet paprika. The interesting part is that the final result was not that spicy, even though that habanero packs a punch (and was supplemented by the other chiles) - the essential sour fruitiness of the habanero was there, but much of the sharp capsicum impact had dissipated somehow. Next time I'll use more!

Final point - it is remarkable how the unglazed tagine adds a flavor of its own. Of course this is the whole point but I wonder whether sometimes I want the slow-cooking properties of earthenware without that particular flavor (which I can't quite pinpoint - some combination of the clay and all the dishes that have cooked in it previously). An excuse to buy a glazed tagine!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

MM8 your sweetbreads look fantastic

PB, same with the scallop. Just perfect

Patrick, great color on the chicken

Tonight I made black beans and rice. Cuban/Puerto Rican style

Added a soffrito at the beginning and the end as well as a good glug of red wine vinegar and some fresh olive oil to finish

Posted Image

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Before I settle in for the NIGHTS!!

Denver Game!!

MY Pork Stuffed Peppers.. KIller I must say!! Killer A bit sloppy on the topping.. but

attachicon.gif10392444063_22a3fa2339_h.jpg

A fellow Bronco fan!!!!!!! Yay!!!!!

Pepper looks awesome!

Despite my trying to not eat a lot of carbs, it is pizza night tonight. I decided a thin crust, homemade pizza with my homemade sauce couldn't be too bad for me. Along with that a salad. I am not posting a pic because ya'll have seen my pizza a zillion times.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to an email I received last week from our local Cordon Bleu school, yesterday (20 Oct) was International Chefs' Day. To mark the occasion, they provided a recipe for braised beef cheeks, potato gnocchi and leeks (in both French and English. A caution if using the latter: it asks for '1 Burgundy wine' when it really means '1 carrot, finely chopped').

I've never met a beef cheek I didn't like, so I gave it a try:

CB_cheeks.jpg

Result: very tender, definitely tasty. The sauce was great. Not sure about the leeks; they were OK but I'm not convinced a vinaigrette was really right with the rest of the dish. The whole thing wasn't really that much work, but I'll probably stick with my favourite sous vide beef cheeks - sure, it takes 30 hours but it's not like you have to do anything during that time!

The gnocchi were disappointing. I've had good ones at restaurants, but the few times I've attempted them they've come out rather like warm lumps of wallpaper paste. If there's a secret to non-gluey gnocchi I'd love to hear it.

Served with a Vynfields Pinot Noir from Martinborough, which was as always excellent.

  • Like 2

Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am totally dazzled by the two hundred amazing dishes since I last posted mine. I think I will be dreaming about food tonight when I go to bed.

A few recent dishes.

dcarch

-- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Smoked chicken ($0.79 a lb), beet stems ($0.00 from farmers market)

smokedchickenbeetgreens_zps450f9833.jpg

smokedchickenbeetgreens2_zps7b3fa9a3.jpg

Still getting Tomatoes from the garden ($0.00 a lb)

tomatostarfruit_zps97d61945.jpg

tomatostarfruit2_zpse276f59d.jpg

Sous Vide chicken ($0.59 a lb) and delicata squash ($0.90 each)

delicatachicken2_zps61ac09d3.jpg

delicatachicken_zps780512a5.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

. . . .

attachicon.gifCB_cheeks.jpg

. . . .

The gnocchi were disappointing. I've had good ones at restaurants, but the few times I've attempted them they've come out rather like warm lumps of wallpaper paste. If there's a secret to non-gluey gnocchi I'd love to hear it.

. . . .

The dish may not have tasted perfect, but it looks gorgeous! I wonder whether a drizzle of something along the lines of balsamic vinegar would have been more satisfying than the vinaigrette.

I made gnocchi last night, too! I've never had a problem with glueyness, but I think that is at least partly because I almost never make traditional ones (owing to problems with wheat and potatoes). Even if I do use potatoes, I still use rice flour (and/or chestnut flour) instead of wheat flour, and regardless of whether I use potato or winter squash, I put it through a food mill, which makes for a coarser-looking puree than putting it through a sieve (as the recipe you linked to instructs), but this breaks down fewer cells, so less starch leaks out (again, reducing the gluey texture), and the puree breaks down to complete smoothness when you work the flour into the dough.

  • Like 1

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Every thing here: delicous !

My Way : " Dinner (s) @ $ 0.79 a lbs" part one

two of Franks 5 + pounders and Acorn Squash. some thing Green might be added for pt. 2:

that might jack up the price considerably:

Dinners@79 cent:lbs.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...