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patrickamory

Dinner! 2013 (Part 5)

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Thanks to my new Anova...sous vide veal chop with morel and kale. Served with sous vide carrots in brown sugar butter and sous vide butternut squash with herbs. Lots of sous vide time today...

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I made these couscous stuffed poussins for a friend's dinner party. This is why the plates are different to my standard plates (if anyone is keeping track!).

To my knowledge, nobody is crazy enough to consider tunnel boning a poussin, then stuffing it, then suturing it so that it appears whole, and then injecting it with sauce and roasting it. It is a lot of work, I had to do 10 of these little bastards. I also forgot to bring my suture holder, which meant that I was MUCH slower at suturing and more wasteful of sutures than I normally am.

original.jpg

I didn't take a picture of the tunnel boning process this time, but here is an older photo showing a tunnel boned poussin on the right.

original.jpg

One completed bird.

original.jpg

Cut in half to show that it is indeed deboned. The stuffing is couscous with shallots, a brunoise of mushroom, carrot, and celery, and speck. It was injected with stock to help keep the birds plump.

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Actually, it's pretty common to do with pigeon, which are a good bit smaller. I can think of Pigeon Andre Malraux at Laserre, Pigeon Ranier III at Grand Vefour and the stuffed pigeon with foie gras and olives from Piege, though I don't know that he makes it now that he has moved on from the Ritz. It is a nice technique, here is a picture with quite a rich stuffing.

DSC_000346.jpg

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Some spectacular meals here.
Prawncrackers, your photos are fantastic. Great lighting. Beautifully plated.

Nickrey, As much as I love duck, it is the roasted potatoes that has my mouth watering.

Dcarch, great idea using scallion dough to make a pizza.

Cookalong, I like how you plated the lamb chops.

Miraklegirl, I have to disagree too. If I served your dinner to my husband he would be a very, very happy man.

Keith, beautiful job boning out those birds. I cheat and cut down the back. Requires a little more suturing. Love the cutting board.

Grilled%20Prime%20Rib%20November%205th%2
Grilled a small prime rib. Just big enough for two slices.
Grilled%20Prime%20Rib%20November%205th%2

Buttery Mashed potatoes and steamed broccoli.

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something quick after what felt like a longer than usual 12 hr shift at work.

not pretty but very tasty. homemade peameal bacon, fried cut up leftover baked potato , sunny side up egg. ( it broke going on the plate but I can't claim to care much, taking a picture almost didn't happen as it is. lol )

12hrshift_zps32c8df29.jpg

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sigma, that's interesting. Do you know the type of sutures that they use? Do they make interrupted or continuous stitches? I used 2-0 silk, interrupted. I normally use 3-0 or finer, but I couldn't get hold of that this time.

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DSC_0015_zpsff8deebd.jpg

So what is it?

I'm thinking puy lentils on salmon "cannelloni" with cream cheese filling, shaped lime, basil and tomato flower with dill.

No, that's not it.

Maybe a better picture next time if you are going to play mystery dish?

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sigma, that's interesting. Do you know the type of sutures that they use? Do they make interrupted or continuous stitches? I used 2-0 silk, interrupted. I normally use 3-0 or finer, but I couldn't get hold of that this time.

I'm pretty sure they use kitchen string.


Edited by sigma (log)
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Nickrey, As much as I love duck, it is the roasted potatoes that has my mouth watering.

I was really pleased with them. 20 minutes in boiling water followed by draining, cooling down and letting them lose liquid. I then heated oven to 180C (350F) with duck fat in the pan. Added potatoes and turned them frequently for the first ten minutes or so as they seemed to be frying in the oil. Cooked for around 15-20 minutes after this turning every five minutes or so. They were the best I've ever done. Crispy on outside and feather light inside.

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DSC_0015_zpsff8deebd.jpg

So what is it?

I'm thinking puy lentils on salmon "cannelloni" with cream cheese filling, shaped lime, basil and tomato flower with dill.

No, that's not it.

Maybe a better picture next time if you are going to play mystery dish?

I'm afraid this comment veers dangerously off topic.

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I made these couscous stuffed poussins for a friend's dinner party. This is why the plates are different to my standard plates (if anyone is keeping track!).

To my knowledge, nobody is crazy enough to consider tunnel boning a poussin, then stuffing it, then suturing it so that it appears whole, and then injecting it with sauce and roasting it. It is a lot of work, I had to do 10 of these little bastards. I also forgot to bring my suture holder, which meant that I was MUCH slower at suturing and more wasteful of sutures than I normally am.

original.jpg

I didn't take a picture of the tunnel boning process this time, but here is an older photo showing a tunnel boned poussin on the right.

original.jpg

One completed bird.

original.jpg

Cut in half to show that it is indeed deboned. The stuffing is couscous with shallots, a brunoise of mushroom, carrot, and celery, and speck. It was injected with stock to help keep the birds plump.

You have more patience than I - but I'd recommend a straight silk cutting suture next time - don't need the needle driver - saves lots of time.

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Made a turkey sausage and chicken gumbo the other night

a3avatyn.jpg


Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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If you follow this topic

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/132193-the-ladies-who-lunch/?p=1939921

Then you'll know I was in an International store today where I found this lovely amaranth:

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I have never cooked or eaten amaranth before so I googled for a recipe and came up with stir-fried shrimp and amaranth:

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Quite satisfactory. A bit like spinach without the astringency.

Anna N, consider trying a stir-fry of the amaranth with dried shrimp (har mai) (softened in a little warm water) & garlic next time, or a soup with or without the dried prawns and/or with other proteins in it, and see if you like it in those ways too. (There are some dishes w/ amaranth in the lunch thread)

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Ann_T

that is the finest looking RB Ive ever seen ! Im not a fan of globs of fat, this one nicely trimmed and the mash looks delicious.

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re: sutures. someone needs to invent edible staples. adds a little crunch.

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I made chicken and dumplings today. I prefer drop dumplings and only make this dish once a year since i don't ever want to get tired of it.

DSCN0915_zpsbc5d5ed8.jpg

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re: sutures. someone needs to invent edible staples. adds a little crunch.

I did try once using strips of scallions and leeks in place of string. It wasnt a huge success, but it was tasty.

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re: sutures. someone needs to invent edible staples. adds a little crunch.

Meat glue?

dcarch

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Nickrey, that is my favourite way to make roasted potatoes. Par Boil, drain and back into the pot, shake the pan over low heat to dry and rough up the potatoes before adding to the hot fat.

Rotus, Thank you. I agree, not a big fan of roasts with lots of excess fat.

Norm, YUM! Chicken and Dumplings, pure comfort food. I also prefer drop dumplings . I'd feel deprived though if I only had them once a year. Not something I get tired of.

I use unwaxed dental floss to stitch up boned chicken/turkey. Easy to remove. One quick pull and it slides right out.

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sigma, that's interesting. Do you know the type of sutures that they use? Do they make interrupted or continuous stitches? I used 2-0 silk, interrupted. I normally use 3-0 or finer, but I couldn't get hold of that this time.

I think I am going to have to bring some sutures home to add to kitchen tools!

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I made this because on anther thread it was discussed if the skin on pork belly should be removed.

What?!

dcarch

Sous vided pork belly with crispy skin

crispyporkbelly2_zpsde7dc09e.jpg

crispyporkbelly_zpse086779b.jpg

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Turbot from Normandy roasted on the bone, vegetables of the moment, veal jus aux barbes

B4iLrhcl.png

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I made this because on anther thread it was discussed if the skin on pork belly should be removed.

What?!

dcarch

Sous vided pork belly with crispy skin

crispyporkbelly2_zpsde7dc09e.jpg

crispyporkbelly_zpse086779b.jpg

darch! You can't just show us this and not tell us how you managed to make it so PERFECT!

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DSC_0015_zpsff8deebd.jpg

So what is it?

I'm thinking puy lentils on salmon "cannelloni" with cream cheese filling, shaped lime, basil and tomato flower with dill.

No, that's not it.

Maybe a better picture next time if you are going to play mystery dish?

It is pretty obviously caviar from the picture.

And it's in the Grand Livre de Cuisine de Joel Robuchon.


Edited by Antwaan Randle Kay (log)

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