Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

lesliec

Drinks! (2013 Part 2)

Recommended Posts

In large amounts, no, not really. But 1/2 oz in a drink loaded with other assertive ingredients? It'll do in a pinch.


Edited by Rafa (log)

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's worth considering what else beer can do in tropical drinks; I know Jacob Grier's My Ta-IPA makes good use of IPA's grapefruity bitterness.

Not exactly 'tropical' but a particularly memorable beer cocktail in the fruity/spicy genre was the Violet Hour's Shoot The Piano Player (Laird's Bonded Apple Brandy, Cinnamon Honey Syrup, House Made Amer Picon, Blanche de Bruxelles).

  • Like 1

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not exactly 'tropical' but a particularly memorable beer cocktail in the fruity/spicy genre was the Violet Hour's Shoot The Piano Player (Laird's Bonded Apple Brandy, Cinnamon Honey Syrup, House Made Amer Picon, Blanche de Bruxelles).

Sounds interesting. Do you have the ratios by any chance?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not exactly 'tropical' but a particularly memorable beer cocktail in the fruity/spicy genre was the Violet Hour's Shoot The Piano Player (Laird's Bonded Apple Brandy, Cinnamon Honey Syrup, House Made Amer Picon, Blanche de Bruxelles).

Sounds interesting. Do you have the ratios by any chance?

Unfortunately, not. I recall that it was built over a healthy amount of KD ice in a tulip glass. Knowing the VH template, 2/.5/.25, topped with wit would likely be going in the right direction, but I'll ask around for specifics.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds excellent. I'll see if I can get the ratios.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 'standard' Mai Tai again last night - 2 each Appleton VX and Wray & Nephew, 1 each orgeat, falernum and curaçao (all home-made) with a dribble of Smoke & Oakum on top. Gawd, that's lovely.

I must reveal my new collection of tiki mugs to the assembled eGullet masses sometime, but I didn't take any photos last night. (It's not an extensive collection. Three, in fact. But Wifey's getting another one for Christmas, so maybe after that.)

FP, nice to see you following my lead with the green stripey 'bamboo' straws.

Please, please, please, let's have a look at your tiki mug collection.

Regarding the paper straws, they are nice and feel much better than metal straws, the other environment-friendly option. Thanks for providing the inspiration.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whi' Punch - no not wee.

Make a ti' punch with whiskey instead of rum. I used 40 Creek Canadian whiskey this time.

A dash of Angostrura orange bitters goes well in this one but I suppose that makes it an old fashioned with cane syrup and a bit of lime.

Nowhere near as good as the tequila variation qui' punch) that I think I like more than the original, but quite drinkable - not surprising since it's nearly all whiskey.

So the cane syrup I bought seems pretty much like simple to me. I don't think I'll buy it again.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first attempt at a White Negroni using some new purchases: 1:1:1 Cocchi Americano, Suze and Tanq. I wonder if a more boisterous gin--a genever--might work better here. Suze and Cocchi don't fuck around.

EDIT

And now some Herbsaint, another new purchase. 1:1 with water and a single ice cube. Wow. So much better than Pernod, which I've only recently developed a taste for. I suspect this will be vastly superior in a Saz to either Pernod or the cheap bullshit South African absinthe that I have.


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Experiment 1: Spiced Apple Old Fashioned:

1/4 oz or so cinnamon syrup

2 dashes Regan's orange bitters

1 dash Angostura

2 oz Laird's Bonded Applejack

Nutmeg grated on top.

Experiment successful! :biggrin:


Edited by Hassouni (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first attempt at a White Negroni using some new purchases: 1:1:1 Cocchi Americano, Suze and Tanq. I wonder if a more boisterous gin--a genever--might work better here. Suze and Cocchi don't fuck around.

I've found that 3-2-1 gin-Cocchi-Suze works a little better for me in that drink, the Suze can definitely be a beast.


Edited by sbumgarner (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first attempt at a White Negroni using some new purchases: 1:1:1 Cocchi Americano, Suze and Tanq. I wonder if a more boisterous gin--a genever--might work better here. Suze and Cocchi don't fuck around.

I've found that 3-2-1 gin-Cocchi-Suze works a little better for me in that drink, the Suze can definitely be a beast.

For the White Negroni, I like a 1.5/1/0.75 gin/Lillet/Suze ratio, on the rocks. Typically I go with Beefeater gin.

PDT has a version that is a little less intense, with Plymouth gin and a 2.0/1/0.75 gin/Lillet/Suze ratio, which is served up.

By the way, you may want to try it with Lillet rather than Cocchi. The Cocchi version is not bad but after a lot of experimentation I came to the conclusion that the orignal version with Lillet is a little more interesting.

By the way, which Suze are you using, the original one or the new Saveur d'Autrefois?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FP, how different is the Bonal to, say, Suze? I don't think I've seen it here.

Very different. It's more like a fortified wine-based gentiane-quina a la Cocchi Americano, although with a mixed mistelle/brandy base rather than wine (like a Pineau des Charentes). It has a dark red fruit character (cherry, plum, grape) and is drier and less bright compared to the Cocchi; if Cocchi Americano is a zestier and more bitter Lillet, then Bonal is a darker and more complex Dubonnet. It pairs well with dark spirits.

As Rafa said. Bonal and Suze have gentiane in common, but the gentiane root flavor is much more prominent in Suze. Suze is sweeter and much more bitter than Bonal.

Bonal is a quinquina, so technically it's in the same family as Lillet and Cocchi, although it's got a very different vibe. Bonal reminds me of a slightly bitter and more herbal sweet vermouth, like something you could obtain by mixing sweet vermouth with an amaro.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, an Improved Holland Gin Cocktail:

1.5 oz Anchor Genevieve

.75 oz St. George Dry Rye

.25 oz Simple

.25 oz Leopold Bros. Maraschino

.125 oz Vieux Pontarlier Absinthe

Dash Miracle Mile Sour Cherry Bitters

Dash Bitter Truth Grapefruit Bitters

Grapefruit Twist Garnish

BZocm8MIIAE0jhw.jpg

Afterward, a pour of Four Roses Limited Edition Single Barrel (2012 Edition)...I used to say this was the best bourbon out there that no one really talked about, but that's certainly changing.

  • Like 2

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KD1191 - This looks great. Could you please describe the Anchor genevieve in comparison the dry rye gin, and to something like the Bols genever? I've been eyeing the genevieve for a while now but haven't had a chance to try it.

I can't recall having any Bols since shortly after it was released in the U.S. At the time, I thought it was pretty toned down (I may have ever been heard to say weak) in comparison to the Genevieve. The Dry Rye is somewhere in-between on maltiness, but with more juniper punch than either.

The Genevieve is 98 proof, compared to 90 for the Dry Rye and 84 for Bols genever...so it's not entirely surprising that strength/depth of flavor-wise, that's pretty much how they line up.

I like the mouthfeel of the Dry Rye. The Genevieve is just a bit above the sweet-spot for gin proof, in my opinion, but that's not to say it can't be calmed.

On flavor, the Dry Rye lacks balance. I can appreciate high juniper content (Anchor's Junipero is another one of my favorites), but in concert with the distinct whiskey-like maltiness, I find it hard to strike the right tone when using it as the main ingredient. So, I find myself using it as I did here, as a modifier to other gins when I want gin, but something a bit more rough, complex, or maybe 'olde tyme'. By contrast, Genevieve was the first genever-style gin I ever tasted, so I tend to use it as something of a baseline. The juniper is there, but it doesn't get in the way of the predominant malty sweetness and spice. I know what I'm getting when I mix it into a classic gin recipe, or a modern genever one. The Dry Rye, not so much...it requires considerably more patience and imagination that I typically have when I'm reaching for a bottle of gin.

  • Like 1

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Genevieve is the Smith & Cross of genevers.

  • Like 2

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Genevieve is the Smith & Cross of genevers.

You need to work in ads when finance does its number on your morals :biggrin:

Genevieve is the Smith & Cross of genevers.

I think I need this asap. Can no longer resist.

See Rafa? You can sell.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A good one to settle the stomach:

1 oz Beefeater Gin

1 oz Fernet (last of my non-Branca)

Build over ice

Add 2 oz tonic (Cascade - yes Chris it is good)

A tiny wedge of lemon squeezed over and dropped in

I just made this. It is now and forever named the haresfur and tonic.

  • Like 1

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Genevieve is the Smith & Cross of genevers.

You need to work in ads when finance does its number on your morals :biggrin:

Genevieve is the Smith & Cross of genevers.

I think I need this asap. Can no longer resist.

See Rafa? You can sell.

"Acura, the Smith & Cross of hatchbacks."

"Gillette, the Smith & Cross of razors."

"Microsoft, the Smith & Cross of personal computing."

"You're a one trick pony, García. I'm going to need your badge and your smokes on my desk."

  • Like 1

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...