• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

lesliec

Drinks! (2013 Part 2)

410 posts in this topic

That's not Michael Stipe in the background by the way, not matter what you think.

I think I thought I saw him try.

He did, but I slapped his face. We shared a cigarette later so it's all cool.

So you're the reason his voice was wrecked on his last few records. (I have written several thousands words on R.E.M. My secret shame.)

Edit: Accidental double post. Made the most of it.


Edited by Rafa (log)

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aphrodisiac. No speaking needed. ;)

Maybe I should rename it the Overshare. :) Well, we did ask...

Recently I enjoyed a Holidays Away at Pouring Ribbons. With Islay Scotch, honey syrup, lemon peel, Unicum, and a touch of Bénédictine, it's like a bittered, aromatic take on a Penicillin. Highly recommended, if that sounds appealing.


Edited by Rafa (log)

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aphrodisiac. No speaking needed. ;)

Maybe I should rename it the Overshare. :) Well, we did ask...

I was going to say that I'll have what she's having, but am very unfortunately sans Cynar at the moment.

This week is not starting well at all.

Anyway, back to the weekend fun. Tried a De La Louisiane and its diametric opposite, Michael Madrusan's Deep Blue Sea - light, crisp and slightly salty. If you have a bottle of violette languishing somewhere, give it a try.

10259887543_d6a6912c39_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyway, back to the weekend fun. Tried a De La Louisiane and its diametric opposite, Michael Madrusan's Deep Blue Sea - light, crisp and slightly salty. If you have a bottle of violette languishing somewhere, give it a try.

I guess I'll add that one to the list of others I have lined up to try if the LCBO ever decides to bring in a violette.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyway, back to the weekend fun. Tried a De La Louisiane and its diametric opposite, Michael Madrusan's Deep Blue Sea - light, crisp and slightly salty. If you have a bottle of violette languishing somewhere, give it a try.

I guess I'll add that one to the list of others I have lined up to try if the LCBO ever decides to bring in a violette.

Here you go - http://www.lcbo.com/lcbo-ear/lcbo/product/searchResults.do?ITEM_NAME=260331&ITEM_NUMBER=260331&language=EN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Kerry! When'd they do that? If I'm not thinking of something else, the last I saw, they had that on the online order thing for like $80... which I was unwilling to pay. Didn't know they moved it into regular stock and cut the price in half.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'll add that one to the list of others I have lined up to try if the LCBO ever decides to bring in a violette.

Here you go - http://www.lcbo.com/lcbo-ear/lcbo/product/searchResults.do?ITEM_NAME=260331&ITEM_NUMBER=260331&language=EN

Isn't crème Yvette a bit different from crème de violette though? From what I read, it's more berry and vanilla-forward and may not be a good substitute. See for example kindredcocktails and imbibe magazine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't crème Yvette a bit different from crème de violette though? From what I read, it's more berry and vanilla-forward and may not be a good substitute. See for example kindredcocktails and imbibe magazine.

Most definitely - for better or worse depending on the application, Creme Yvette is much subtler with the violet. You can use a lot more Creme Yvette without overwhelming the cocktail, where as is most cases more than a quarter ounce of creme de violette turns your drink into perfume.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's right. There is this comparison below from Erik in the Creme Yvette thread, and this detailed one which concludes that creme de violette is preferred for classic cocktails, although Yvette may work in some cases. But keep in mind that intensity, taste, and even color (Yvette has a reddish tinge) are different.

They're pretty different liqueurs.

The Rothman & Winter Violet is pretty single notedly Violet and not particularly sweet. Unless you really like Violet, it needs to be deployed with some care, as its intense violet flavor can easily overwhelm the other elements of a drink.

The Cooper Creme Yvette has some Violet, but also elements of berry fruits and Citrus. I don't have a lot of experience mixing with it. Having a hard time justifying buying another bottle of Violet liqueur for the house. I probably already have more than I will use in this lifetime.

Parfait Amour (depending on the brand) is Citrus with some Violet notes, but ultimately most people compare the flavor of the Brizard Parfait Amour to something like Grape Jelly Beans or another artificially flavored fruit candy. It also needs to be deployed with care in cocktails.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't crème Yvette a bit different from crème de violette though? From what I read, it's more berry and vanilla-forward and may not be a good substitute. See for example kindredcocktails and imbibe magazine.

I suppose what it comes down to for me is that the LCBO has the Yvette, they may or may not have anything else in the violette general category soon or ever. I'm undecided on whether or not I'm going to grab it but I don't have very high hopes of there being an alternative any time in the near future either. With the quantities generally used in drinks being so small, I'm wondering if a violet syrup would do the job.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think tonight calls for an Aviary Cocktail, courtesy of Grant Achatz and American Bartender of the Year Charles Joly.

The Aviary Cocktail

  • 100g vodka
  • 50gr Red Bull
  • 25g carbonated Gatorade
  • 10g Midori
  • 5g whey protein
  • .5 Malort tincture
  • 2 each fist bumps

No instructions provided, but I think we can safely assume they're "CHUG CHUG CHUG."


Edited by Rafa (log)

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think tonight calls for an Aviary Cocktail, courtesy of Grant Achatz and American Bartender of the Year Charles Joly.

The Aviary Cocktail

  • 100g vodka
  • 50gr Red Bull
  • 25g carbonated Gatorade
  • 10g Midori
  • 5g whey protein
  • .5 Malort tincture
  • 2 each fist bumps

No instructions provided, but I think we can safely assume they're "CHUG CHUG CHUG."

Or how to get rid of that awful bottle of Midori that you foolishly bought in the 90's?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this the first ever recipe calling for Red Bull in grams?


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Careful. Those are probably metric fist bumps, which are 2.2 times bigger than imperial fist bumps.

2 people like this

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, but they're weaker, as they don't carry the steel gauntlets of empire.

Do they sell shirts that read "I'm bigger in metric" ?

1 person likes this

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this the first ever recipe calling for Red Bull in grams?

I've been in DK too long, as soon as I read this, I thought 'HAH! In grams maybe, but not, alas, in metric: behold, the "Jäger bomb"':

25 cl Red Bull

4 cl vodka

4 cl Jägermeister

CHUGCHUGCHUG... dance.

1 person likes this

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sherry Cobblers and Smith & Cross mojitos tonight while blasting The Clash. This drink would be appropriate but I can't bring myself to drink something with a whole ounce of Cherry Heering at the moment.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I Am D.B. Cooper


Douglas fir eau de vie (Clear Creek)


2 oz. rye (McKenzie, because I'm finishing up a bottle)


¾ oz. rosemary-infused maple syrup (Yum.)


¾ oz. lime juice


3 dashes Angostura Bitters


Rinse glass with eau de vie. Shake and double-strain remaining ingredients into an Old Fashioned glass with large ice cube. Garnish with slapped rosemary sprig.


http://www.sfexaminer.com/sanfrancisco/grab-a-db-cooper-cocktail-and-disappear-at-prospect/Content?oid=2597063


Very tasty, but the aroma of the garnish might be a bit overpowered...


1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tooling around with the chilli-infused simple syrup I used in Edward Lee's jalapeno mint julep. It's weather enough for a Collins, I guess. So here we are with a jalapeno-infused Tom using West Winds Cutlass and, oh, because the simple is pretty mild, a few drops of Habanero Shrub.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Time for a classic. My very favourite classic. Old Fashioned w/ Wild Turkey 101 rye and Fee's whiskey barrel aged bitters.

That sounds really good, Chris. I have a bottle of Wild Turkey 101 bourbon, but sadly not the rye.

More drinks (going through the backlog).

For a dinner party, I made Corpse Revivers No. 2 for my male friends & Sunflowers for their dates (I was too busy to take photos). Sunflowers were prepared with the last of my homemade elderflower cordial.

The next day I was still in the mood for a Lillet/absinthe combo so I went with David Slape's Paddington.

10129678215_c445c0c684_z.jpg

A couple of nights ago, this terrific Manhattan with St. George Breaking & Entering bourbon, Dolin rouge, Angostura bitters, brandied cherry. Grab this bourbon if you can find it.

10321225036_c9a332a543_z.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's Jack Rose weather. I'm out of grenadine so I made one with cranberry syrup. Nice and Thanksgivings-y.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

grappa lime sour

2 oz. aldeia velha, aguardiente bagaceira envelhecida

1 oz. lime juice

8 g. non aromatic white sugar

this is a really beautiful sour from a spirit that hasn't gotten its due. these Portuguese grape brandies can really be sublime. according to the back of the label they like to be thought of as "fruity, but robust". some how they are a Pernod Ricard product but imported by the exemplary fringe importer, Grape Moments. this stuff doesn't take itself too seriously because its produced in traditional "cooper" stills from the "distilation" of the best white grapes. I could run an entire bar program on these brilliant unsung Portuguese products. some day.


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.