Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Gardening: 2013–2015


ChrisTaylor
 Share

Recommended Posts

The first mulberries were brought in Wednesday. Today I picked the first grape-leaves, for stuffing.

  • Like 2

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first mulberries were brought in Wednesday. Today I picked the first grape-leaves, for stuffing.

We have tons of mulberry trees here on our property.  I used to pick them and use them in pies, but they are so much work.  A lot of them have these tiny worms in them that are a pain to get out.

 

Are your trees sprayed?  What do you do with the berries?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I live in a large urban area, so I have limited space (but huge plans!). I have two mulberry trees which I don't spray. One tree has low branches and I go out every day to collect the newly ripened berries. I really enjoy just eating them fresh. Most of the berries on the other tree are too high. My ultimate plan is to turn my entire "back-yard" into a real "garden".

  • Like 1

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In spite of some yo-yo weather my garden is settling in.

 

The garlic I planted last fall is doing great.

 

In fact we'll have garlic scapes for dinner this week.

Garlic scapes.png

 

This may be my favorite part of the garden - the salad section.

Greens.png

 

Here are 2 views of the whole thing:

Garden.png

Garden2.png

 

This is not (yet) part of the garden (and will never be if I can stop it) but it is the bane of my existence - oregano that escaped from the herb garden, went native and is now invading everywhere. I will never again plant oregano. When my husband uses the weed eater our yard smells like his grand mother's kitchen. oregano.png

 

Elaina

 

 

Garlic.png

Edited by ElainaA (log)
  • Like 9

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've heard about Oregano's legendary invasive abilities. But, I finally planted some in pots along with Thyme and Marjoram this Spring. Plans are to keep them in large pots to keep them from spreading. Thanks for reinforcing my approach!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've heard about Oregano's legendary invasive abilities. But, I finally planted some in pots along with Thyme and Marjoram this Spring. Plans are to keep them in large pots to keep them from spreading. Thanks for reinforcing my approach!

Darn! I wish I had heard this before I planted it. I have long thought that a book listing invasive plants would be very useful. I'm still trying to get rid of the spiderwort that my daughter's kindergarten teacher gave me 25 years ago.

 

Elaina

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've heard about Oregano's legendary invasive abilities. But, I finally planted some in pots along with Thyme and Marjoram this Spring. Plans are to keep them in large pots to keep them from spreading. Thanks for reinforcing my approach!

Excellent idea to stop the plants from spreading. Mint is another plant that should only be grown in pots. It spreads everywhere if planted in the ground.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Advice my neighbor should have heeded. Their MO is planting invasive and fast growing plants just their side of the property line. The mint smells wonderful as I mow over it...  :laugh:

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Garden6-16_3610.jpg

 

I had to stop buying herbs at the nurseries when I ran out of spare pots. This year's haul: Moroccan mint (in the black grower's pot), thyme, marjoram, 'Spice Islands' rosemary, lemon savory, a couple Genovese basil, one variegated basil (Ocimum 'Pesto Perpetuo' , very pretty on fresh tomato salads), Italian oregano, dwarf Greek oregano, and green shiso. Some of the plants got short haircuts when I made a pot of spaghetti sauce this weekend.

 

I lost almost all of last year's herbs to a whitefly infestation, and then the rest didn't overwinter that well. They rarely do. There's not enough cold weather here to send them into dormancy. The herbs become shaggy and woody and lacking in vitality, and don't grow well in their second spring. Eventually I lose patience and dump them. I frequently start with new herbs every year.

 

The pink rose is 'Jeanne Corboeuf' (hybrid tea, 1902). My other roses have finished their first flush of bloom and are contemplating rebloom, but Jeanne is already budding and flowering. She always seems to be ahead of the pack. On the left edge of the pic, peeking underneath the Japanese mock orange, is sweet woodruff, an herb whose flowers can be made into wine. Mine blooms very little, so there will be no wine, only an attractive groundcover.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first mulberries were brought in Wednesday. Today I picked the first grape-leaves, for stuffing.

My grandmother use to roll with mulberry leaves. She had trees in Syria as a child and had a big mulberry tree in Tampa at her first house there. We prefer the mulberry to grape when rolling if we can find them

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, had to share those beauty pots with friends. They all gone now. Just so creamy and 'potatoie', if that is a word.

But loads more plants left. No more pasta or rice for awhile as we plough those these jewels from the earth arrive.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Summer is here in Kansas.  Not too super hot, though (yet).  We've had rain and sun.  Almost perfect for gardens and crops.  Thought I'd post some garden pics.

 

This was taken a month ago.  I think peas are so pretty!  They have now been pulled out and there is just space there waiting for a fall planting of spinach and/or lettuce.

 

 

 

photo 1.JPG

 

This was also taken a while ago.  Onions.  They are still there but are not as green and I've picked some.

 

photo 2.JPG

 

The rest of the pictures are from today.

 

Picked this morning.  Not a great picture, but you get the point lol.  Yes,  Huiray, that zuke got away from me.  He was hiding and I didn't see him so he got a bit big.

 

photo 1.JPG

 

As soon as I bring the basket of garden goodies in the cats are all over it.  I'm getting ready to make some quick pickles (quickles) here in a bit.

 

photo 2.JPG

 

 

Cucumbers.  I have a couple more growing to the east.

 

photo 3.JPG

 

Eggplant

 

photo 4.JPG

 

Collards

 

photo 5.JPG

 

 

Basil

 

photo 1.JPG

 

 

Okra--aren't the flowers pretty?

 

photo 2.JPG

 

A few days ago I noticed the dreaded squash bug had invaded the squash so we sprayed them with some kind of something.  The plants did NOT like it and some of the leaves "burned".  I killed the cantaloupes (I think).  Sigh.  Live and learn.  The squash are coming back so that's good.  The sweet corn is in there too.  The field corn looks much better.  Go figure.

 

photo 3.JPG

 

 

Some of the peppers

 

photo 4.JPG

 

 

Some of the tomatoes

 

photo 5.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow. Just wow, Shelby. I adore pics of your farm garden. it's so lovely and expansive and varied. I do love the Okra flower! Maybe the cantaloupe will come back, I hope so! 

 

Do the kitties just want to sniff the produce or do they actually like to eat any of it? I used to have a cat that was absolutely MAD for cantaloupe. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice, Shelby...and cute mouser!  :smile:

  • Like 2

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My three Rutgers tomato plants are groaning (that may be part of the problem) with ripening fruit.  Two days ago I received notice from the rental agent for my landlords that I must remove the planters from my balcony immediately.  To do this I would have to hire a contractor.  Which I can't afford at the moment.  I have been feeling quite ill over this.

 

For the first summer I can remember all the vegetables (and fruits and flowers) are doing beautifully.  Even my dead grape vine (planted by birds some years ago) just put out a few green leaves.

 

I joked with a friend that I don't know whether to hire a contractor, lawyer, or psychiatrist.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...