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Grilled cheese sandwich: serious comfort food


Smithy
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If I'm feeling fancy, smoked gouda with sliced pears is delicious. On rare occasions, I've used mango chutney with a variety of cheeses and really liked it. I rarely have soup with a grilled cheese, but there's something about plain (salted) potato chips that works as a side.

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My favorite is a mixture of Gruyere and extra sharp cheddar with sliced tomatoes on pumpernickel or rye with caraway.

Try this variation: Huntsman cheese (cheddar with a layer of blue cheese in the middle) and sliced tomatoes (or better, pickled green tomato!). So very good.

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My husband insists on tomato soup (from the can, mixed with a can of milk) alongside but I won't do that.

One of the best apps I've had in a long while was a tomato fondue served with grilled cheddar brioche (bite-sized for dipping). I haven't tried to recreate it yet...any suggestions for making tomato fondue?

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If I'm feeling fancy, smoked gouda with sliced pears is delicious. On rare occasions, I've used mango chutney with a variety of cheeses and really liked it. I rarely have soup with a grilled cheese, but there's something about plain (salted) potato chips that works as a side.

Do you put the sliced pears in the sandwich? If so, before or after the sandwich is grilled?

I'm a sucker for plain, salted potato chips at any time, which is why we rarely have them around the house. I agree that they play nicely off the grilled cheese sandwich.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Do Cuban and Medianoche sandwiches count? They *are* "grilled" (in a press) after all, and usually contain cheese. :-)

Well, at some point the meat and other ingredients overshadow the cheese to the point that "grilled cheese sandwich" would be misleading. For instance, getting a Reuben sandwich when you ordered grilled cheese might be a bit of a surprise. ;-) That doesn't make meaty, cheesy, goozy sandwiches - with or without fruits or vegetables added - any less delicious.

Cuban sandwiches I've read of but not experienced. Medianoche sandwiches are beyond my ken. What are they, and how do you particularly like them?

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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My husband insists on tomato soup (from the can, mixed with a can of milk) alongside but I won't do that.

But have you tried a taste of it, though? Just asking.

I have tried it, and it doesn't work for me. My favorite tomato soup is the tomato-mushroom bisque from Coopersmith's in Ft. Collins, CO. That might go with a grilled cheese sandwich, but I'd rather just make a meal out of the soup and the bread. Then again, as far as my husband's concerned, mac and cheese must must must be accompanied by a slice of bread slathered in smooth peanut butter. I always thought mac and cheese just needed a salad alongside. But I digress.

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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If I'm feeling fancy, smoked gouda with sliced pears is delicious. On rare occasions, I've used mango chutney with a variety of cheeses and really liked it. I rarely have soup with a grilled cheese, but there's something about plain (salted) potato chips that works as a side.

Do you put the sliced pears in the sandwich? If so, before or after the sandwich is grilled?

I'm a sucker for plain, salted potato chips at any time, which is why we rarely have them around the house. I agree that they play nicely off the grilled cheese sandwich.

I put them in before I grill the sandwich -- for some reason I don't mind the warm pears but hate warm tomato slices so add them after grilling. If I'm really ambitious (which I rarely am because the grilled cheese is a great short-on-time, quick, comfort food thing) I might even toss the pears in a little (very little) cinnamon sugar. Like you might for a baked brie.

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I used to make my grilled cheese sandwiches in our vintage Toas Tite stovetop sandwich griller. These puppies are back on the market now, made in China (so, what else is new?).

The Toas Tite made little pies filled with cheese, or whatever else you'd like, and the results were super!

Maybe you grilled cheese aficionados might try one.

http://www.toastite.biz/

 ... Shel


 

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I used to make my grilled cheese sandwiches in our vintage Toas Tite stovetop sandwich griller. These puppies are back on the market now, made in China (so, what else is new?).

The Toas Tite made little pies filled with cheese, or whatever else you'd like, and the results were super!

Maybe you grilled cheese aficionados might try one.

http://www.toastite.biz/

Dude! That's a jaffle! Contents get nuclear hot though.

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Dude! That's a jaffle! Contents get nuclear hot though.

I don't know what a "jaffle" is, and I'm not a "Dude!" even without the exclamation point.

I recall the cheese getting pretty hot, but then, so does most, if not all, cheese that's grilled.

 ... Shel


 

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Sorry, Bloody Awful is a New York version of a Virgin Mary. Heh!

Onion rye bread, decent Swiss cheese, good ripe tomato slices and precooked bacon, cooked to almost crispness. Butter on the outside, mayo on the inside is optional. Cook slowly over low-ish heat until browned and bacon is crispier. If you're lucky, the cheese will melt and hit the pan, so you'll get the crunch of that, too! (You can always press this down to encourage "goozing").

Goozing is my new favourite word even if I think grilled cheese sandwiches are highly overrated!

Mayo on the outside makes a beautiful golden crust. Sliced white bread, medium cheddar (so-called "tasty cheese" here), a bit of fresh pepper. And sometimes it like to pry it open and put some butter lettuce inside afterwards. Love the contrast of the sweet freshness against the golden richness.

Or Turkish bread, no need to butter the outside, sharp cheddar and a thinly sliced Granny Smith piled in afterwards.

In the long-ago I used to like grilled cheese and peanut butter. They ooze (or should it be gooze now?) together beautifully.

The tradition in Oz is the jaffle - I like them a lot, but the interiors can be deadly hot!

Sorry, Bloody Awful is a New York version of a Virgin Mary. Heh!

Onion rye bread, decent Swiss cheese, good ripe tomato slices and precooked bacon, cooked to almost crispness. Butter on the outside, mayo on the inside is optional. Cook slowly over low-ish heat until browned and bacon is crispier. If you're lucky, the cheese will melt and hit the pan, so you'll get the crunch of that, too! (You can always press this down to encourage "goozing").

Goozing is my new favourite word even if I think grilled cheese sandwiches are highly overrated!

Goozing: how I've been needing this word! Thanks!

Anna N, I too thought grilled cheese sandwiches were highly overrated, before I started messing with the ingredients. Now I've made a convert of my husband. Perhaps you're next? :wink:

My husband insists on tomato soup (from the can, mixed with a can of milk) alongside but I won't do that.

One of the best apps I've had in a long while was a tomato fondue served with grilled cheddar brioche (bite-sized for dipping). I haven't tried to recreate it yet...any suggestions for making tomato fondue?

Thank you all for the appreciation of my made-up "goozey". I love that word! Teapot, was the fondue creamy or soupy? If it's creamy you're looking for, use tomato sauce and cream cheese and "stuff" to season to taste.

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Dude! That's a jaffle! Contents get nuclear hot though.

I don't know what a "jaffle" is, and I'm not a "Dude!" even without the exclamation point.

I recall the cheese getting pretty hot, but then, so does most, if not all, cheese that's grilled.

I love the way Aussies talk. Snadra, does "jaffle" mean something good, or is that the name of the Toas Tite as you know it?

Meanwhile...referring to another topic...Shel_B, it looks to me like your Toas Tite might do double duty as a crimper for oversized homemade ravioli. :-)

Edited: stupid formatting.

Edited by Smithy (log)

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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?

Meanwhile...referring to another topic...Shel_B, it looks to me like your Toas Tite might do double duty as a crimper for oversized homemade ravioli. :-)

The thought did not escape me ... the implementation may need some experimentation. I emailed my sister and asked if she still has our original Toas Tite.

 ... Shel


 

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My favorite is a mixture of Gruyere and extra sharp cheddar with sliced tomatoes on pumpernickel or rye with caraway.

Try this variation: Huntsman cheese (cheddar with a layer of blue cheese in the middle) and sliced tomatoes (or better, pickled green tomato!). So very good.

The Huntsman cheese sounds great, but unfortunately, I don't think I can find it here in Greensboro. It's times like these I miss living in Manhattan. Maybe I'll improvise and just do a cheddar/blue cheese combo - thanks!

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.
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Dude! That's a jaffle! Contents get nuclear hot though.

I don't know what a "jaffle" is, and I'm not a "Dude!" even without the exclamation point.

I recall the cheese getting pretty hot, but then, so does most, if not all, cheese that's grilled.

Shel,

You might find this link interesting. http://www.gourmettraveller.com.au/restaurants/restaurant-news-features/2013/6/chefs'-favourite-jaffle-fillings/

Kay

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Do Cuban and Medianoche sandwiches count? They *are* "grilled" (in a press) after all, and usually contain cheese. :-)

Well, at some point the meat and other ingredients overshadow the cheese to the point that "grilled cheese sandwich" would be misleading. For instance, getting a Reuben sandwich when you ordered grilled cheese might be a bit of a surprise. ;-) That doesn't make meaty, cheesy, goozy sandwiches - with or without fruits or vegetables added - any less delicious.

Cuban sandwiches I've read of but not experienced. Medianoche sandwiches are beyond my ken. What are they, and how do you particularly like them?

True enough, I guess. Heh.

A Cuban is made with crusty "Cuban bread", a Medianoche is made with an egg dough bread somewhat like challah.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medianoche and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuban_sandwich

I had an amusing "conversation" with a poster years ago on another food forum about stumbling out of bars at closing time and getting sustenance and she pointed out some places around SF where one could do the stumbling-out routine and be resuscitated by the medianoche (literally, "midnight") from the abuelita near the bar(s) with her cart.

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I used to make my grilled cheese sandwiches in our vintage Toas Tite stovetop sandwich griller. These puppies are back on the market now, made in China (so, what else is new?).

The Toas Tite made little pies filled with cheese, or whatever else you'd like, and the results were super!

Maybe you grilled cheese aficionados might try one.

http://www.toastite.biz/

My British husband swore by those (although made with a stand alone sandwich toaster small appliance) filled with cheese - grated - and the smallest spoonful of baked beans. (British style ones in a tomato sauce, though, not the usual American smokey bbq type.) The ratio of cheese-bread-beans was such that I would consider that in the grilled cheese family, although I'm not sure how successful it would be without the toaster contraption to kind of seal the edges and hold in the sauce from the beans as it heats and tries to drip out before it's melted in with the cheese. Sometimes we'd add some pre-cooked crumbled bacon, also, for a nice crispy salty surprise as you were eating.

I'm with the group that goes with the boring supermarket bread and the American cheese for the Proper grilled cheese sandwich, though. If I have a comfort food grilled cheese craving, that's what I have to have. Usually with some pickles on the side. (I know some people put the pickles in the sandwich, but I prefer to have a bite of sandwich and then next a bite of pickle.)

I keep meaning to try making a grilled cheese - maybe with a good cheddar - using some Marmite mixed with butter inside instead of plain butter. Seems like it might be a tasty flavor combination.

I do like the idea of experimenting with fillings, but I think it is possible to over-dress a grilled cheese sandwich. If the lovely crispy fried/grilled bread and the melted cheese aren't the star ingredients, then imo you need to cut back on the things you're adding. It might be a good sandwich, but at that point it's no longer a grilled cheese. If you see what I mean. :)

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Dude! That's a jaffle! Contents get nuclear hot though.

I don't know what a "jaffle" is, and I'm not a "Dude!" even without the exclamation point.

I'd never heard of a "jaffle" either but google, as nearly always, enlightened. But I do admit to being "Dude!" frequently. I love it when my son calls me that, makes me giggle.
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Kay, your link goes to a 404 message.

Sorry, try this instead:

Kay

Edited to remove new link as that didn't work either. Publication I was trying to link to is gourmettraveller.com.au/restaurants/restaurant-news-features/2013/6/chefs'-favourite-jaffle-fillings.

Kay

Edited by kayswv (log)
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Dude! That's a jaffle! Contents get nuclear hot though.

I don't know what a "jaffle" is, and I'm not a "Dude!" even without the exclamation point.

I recall the cheese getting pretty hot, but then, so does most, if not all, cheese that's grilled.

In which case apologies for the casual salutation of excitement.

A jaffle is indeed a toasted sandwich made in a jaffle iron (known to you as a Toast Tite), which seals the edges in a square or round shape, and sometimes even divides the sandwich into two neat triangles.

Jaffles can be made in a low-tech jaffle iron, over a fire or hot plate, or in an electric jaffle maker, Aussies being so fond of appliances.

They were passe for quite a while but a making a comeback these days. In my staff room a jaffle maker and sandwich press sit next to each other and are used equally, country people being less inclined to throw out perfect good ideas just because they've gone out of fashion.

Ham, cheese and tomato is pretty traditional. Possibly because its delicious

http://www.dailylife.com.au/dl-food/food-features/hot-food-trend-jaffles-20130410-2hkoy.html

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I used to make my grilled cheese sandwiches in our vintage Toas Tite stovetop sandwich griller.

When I was a kid we called these flying saucers and it was part of our camping gear. White bread and some form of cheese product cooked over the campfire -- or more often over a lantern in the tent as it rained outside.

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