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Keith_W

Food funnies

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HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

 

 

I finally got around to watching. That cake is the scariest thing I've ever seen on a screen, movie monsters and politicians included.

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I'd never seen that before. Apparently it was a bit of a scandal when that recipe first aired. Sandra Lee's Wikipedia page even has a whole subsection dedicated to the Kwanzaa Cake:

 

Much of the criticism of Lee has coalesced around a recipe for "Kwanzaa Cake" that she demonstrated on a 2003 episode of Semi-Homemade Cooking with Sandra Lee. The recipe consisted of angel food cake topped with icing, cinnamon, apple pie filling, pumpkin seeds and corn nuts (all store-bought), with seven Kwanzaa candles then inserted into the cake.[16]

 

Food writer Anthony Bourdain, who has been harshly critical of Lee in general, described the video clip of this segment of the show as "eye searing" and "a war crime".[17][18][19] The cake was called "scary" by the Houston Chronicle,[20] and "the most ghastly-sounding dish in Lee's culinary repertoire" by Tulsa World.[21]Salon.com wrote that the video "takes pride of place in the pantheon of hilarious culinary disaster videos".[22]

 

Cookbook author Denise Vivaldo, who claims to have ghostwritten recipes for many celebrity chefs, wrote a humorous post in The Huffington Post in December 2010 stating that she was responsible for the recipe (though she said that the candles were Lee's idea), and apologizing for it, saying that she collaborated with Lee only for the money. She also wrote that Lee "has incredibly bad food taste".[23] A week later, the post was removed, after Lee's lawyer threatened legal action.[24]

 

Lee has said that this recipe is the only one of hers whose criticism she has taken to heart, and that the recipe was partly due to the Food Network dictating the show's content at the time.[24]

 

 

"A war crime." Classic!

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The Onion chimes in about eating.

 

 

Shedding new light on the biological underpinnings behind the behavior, scientists at Brown University announced Tuesday that eating appears to serve a number of key functions besides relieving anxiety.

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For those of you on Facebook, search for 'We Want Plates' - very funny page about the silly way that some chefs serve food.  With pictures.

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Hey Alex,

 

Back on page two, in the last post of that page, you posted a link to a card about Fusilli and Vermicelli that was very amusing, and also a link from the New Yorker from 20 years ago that you said reminded you of the card which depicts a cartoon anthropomorphized rigatoni picking up the phone with the caption, "Fusilli, you crazy bastard! How are you?"

 

I get that one, and the other two food-related cartoons under the main one on the New Yorker page. http://www.condenaststore.com/-sp/Fusilli-you-crazy-bastard-How-are-you-New-Yorker-Cartoon-Prints_i10276284_.htm

 

My question is: what does the third cartoon with the guillotine and the pigeons, with a couple of soldier-looking guys staring at this scene with the caption "The bagels, they just keep getting bigger, no?" mean. I don't get this one, and it's still bugging me.

 

I ran it by my husband, and he didn't get it either. Do you, or anyone else, know?

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My question is: what does the third cartoon with the guillotine and the pigeons, with a couple of soldier-looking guys staring at this scene with the caption "The bagels, they just keep getting bigger, no?" mean. I don't get this one, and it's still bugging me.

 

TftC, see here (bagel guillotine) and here (NYT article about bagels).

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Here's one I did.

 

Happy Easter to all!

 

dcarch

 

th_Eastereggs-1.jpg

Most amusing.

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AVBytes created a musical love tale about an apple and a tomato:



Edited by CeeCee (log)

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Thanks tinyragebaking,

 

It's one of my pet peeves to see expensive and perfectly prepared ingredients nice and hot, ready to be eaten and enjoyed, divided into ridiculously tiny portions, spread out, cooled off, and meticulously (and time-consuminly, while the lovely comestibles cool even more) overly garnished for no known reason.

 

I can see it as art. I just fail to see it as cuisine fit for consumption.

 

 

I found the above amusing, although, I'm a firm believer in free-range chicken.

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Jim Gaffigan's standup is hilarious and most of it is about food. He recently came out with a book called "Food: A Love Story" that's quite funny. I listened to the audiobook on a recent car trip and it got a lot of laughs.

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