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pastameshugana

The Food Photography Topic

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@chromedome good advice. Thanks. 

 

A few few things I’ve learned: 

1. I’m solely using my Nikon D60, a DSLR, for taking photos. I love my iPhone, but if I’m to get serious, I have to use my DSLR for every shoot. Many more options and the photos are much better.

 

2. I got a tripod. Why did I wait so long? Again, this goes hand-in-hand with using the manual functions on the DSLR. And I can change settings on the same shot and see the differences and how I like some settings better for certain shots. And the overhead shots have improved 100%. 

 

3. Styling matters. Styling matters a lot. It elevates the photo from good to great. Small details matter. Those crumbs show up when youve got a good photo. 

 

4. And of course, always improving with lighting, I’m getting more creative with my reflectors. I’m switching the angle to cast different shadows,  see how it affects the shot. Another reason I need a tripod. 

 

5. I’m learning post processing, getting my feet wet with Lightroom. There’s an entire world out there, it’s amazing what simple Instagram filters will do to make an image pop. 

 

Thats is it for now. I’ll post more photos when I get home (in a week). I plan on doing another marathon photo session this weekend. 

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1 hour ago, Smokeydoke said:

2. I got a tripod. Why did I wait so long? Again, this goes hand-in-hand with using the manual functions on the DSLR. And I can change settings on the same shot and see the differences and how I like some settings better for certain shots. And the overhead shots have improved 100%. 

 

Using the tripod:

1. It allows you to shoot at very low light level by setting the exposure long.

2. Try to use the self-timer for the sharpest image. Even on a tripod, the clicking by hand can introduce shaking.

 

dcarch

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I just started shooting and editing in RAW. It's amazing the details that you can bring out by adjusting the shadows and highlights. I've been editing in Affinity Photo on an iPad Pro, and very much enjoy the experience. 

 

My biggest hurdle at the moment is lighting. Daylight is in short supply and my kitchen is dark. I'd love to have a portable, preferably battery-powered lighting solution that doesn't cost a fortune but I don't know if such a thing exists. Soft boxes with hot lights are just too much. (At least, that's my impression.) I'm not going to leave a soft box up all the time, and I'll never use it if I have to set it up every time (unless setup is suuuuuuper quick and easy). A "point and shoot" rechargable LED (or something) light box would be ideal. Are these a thing? And if they are a thing, are they worth buying? 

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36 minutes ago, btbyrd said:

I just started shooting and editing in RAW.

 

I first read this as "shooting and eating in RAW...."

 

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On 5/23/2018 at 1:25 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

That would make an interesting poll.

Who takes the time to process any sort of impromptu photos destined for a forum.

I usually take the easy route for such pics, nothing beyond simple editing.

A blog and such, that's another matter.

 

 

 

It completely depends on what the image needs, if anything.

 

My perspective might be a little different from other peoples', since I use Lightroom to process raw files and organize my photo library ... so pictures get slurped into LR right off my phone or my big camera's memory cards, and the initial processing is automatic. If I don't like the way the default processing looks, it's usually just a matter of moving a couple of sliders until the color pops into balance. Maybe it needs to be cropped or straightened. Then I export into whatever format is needed for posting online or emailing someone. Typically JPEG, at a very reduced size. 

 

If I'm making exhibition prints or sending something out for publication, that's a whole 'nuther story. I might then spend hours or days on an image, much of it in Photoshop, just as I once would have done in the darkroom.

 

I don't know what it's like working with the more consumer-oriented raw processing and library organizing tools. I hear many complaints about these, but then I hear many complaints about Lightroom too ...

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2 hours ago, btbyrd said:

A "point and shoot" rechargable LED (or something) light box would be ideal. Are these a thing? And if they are a thing, are they worth buying? 

 

Be careful with LED lights.

 

Many LED lights flicker (strobe) which interferes with digital image sensor of your digital camera. They do sell special LED lights for photography.

 

By the way, there is no such thing as "white" LEDs. The white is actually generated by a chemical on the LED.

 

dcarch

 

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