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Arey

Best Local Dish

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Recently there was a topic started on the Best National Dish.Tonight while having my dinner of Turkey Loaf (don't laugh I make a really good turkey loaf) Corn picked up at my favorite farmers market and generously slathered with Land O' Lakes unsalted butter, and glistening with salt, and a sliced Jersey tomato from the same farmers market (they grow their own of course) with Genovese Basil (I grow my own Basil) and dribbled with vinaigrette (Julia's basic vinaigrette), I was thinking that while it would presumptuous to think of listing the best national dishes, what about the best local dishes. What dishes can you get in your locality, that are seasonal and you can't get any wheres else. By the end of next month my basil will be shot, the only available corn will be in the frozen foods aisle of the local Acme Supermarket, the tomatoes will be those wretched plastic things, and my favorite farmer's market will have been given over to pumpkins and chrysanthemums. Will you miss produce that's not from Peru, China. Mexico, Holland or California, but from a place just down from the road from you?

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"A fool", he said, "would have swallowed it". Samuel Johnson

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I live in a big, multicultural city (Phoenix) that always seems to have something new happening. That said, almost everything is brought in from someplace else. We have lots of citrus, dates, and pistachios. Non-native, local food production includes a hydroponic tomato farm, a seasonal shrimp farm, an herb farm, and a large egg production facility.

Most residents here are from someplace else, too. So, 'local' food is a hodgepodge of things from around the world. Sonoran dogs are very popular street food here. Restaurant-wise, we have more sushi restaurants per capita than any other metropolitan area. (yes, Arizona is a land-locked state) The chimichanga may or may not have been invented nearby.

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Not particularly local to Georgia, but I always miss in-season tomatoes and corn.

The regional item I miss most from home when I travel is not any produce item but readily available strone ground grits. I was in California visiting family and they begged me to make shrimp and grits, it was a challenge just to find insipid instant grits, let alone the real deal.

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I am from Wales originally and really miss Lavabread - a delicacy made from seaweed - sounds awful but tastes yummy!

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Hi, all!

I am from India. We have a great local dish here, from state Maharashtra known as "Kande Pohe" for morning breakfast.

Loving it. Yummy! :raz: Get this dish more delicious with a sip of hot tea.

Recipe below:

http://www.tarladalal.com/Kanda-Pohe-%28-Mumbai-Roadside-Recipes-%29-33444r

Alankar, it is nice to see a dish that is not on the standard "Indian Restaurant Menu". What are beaten rice flakes like? Are they crunchy like a breakfast cereal, or soft like cream of wheat or oatmeal?

I'm from the northeastern US, New Hampshire, originally; and the seafood would definitely be the regional specialty. Most people would say lobster, and although it is tasty and delicious, I love getting fried bay scallops when I go out for seafood. In fact, fried seafood of all kinds seem to be a local specialty - clams, scallops, haddock or cod, shrimp, etc... The seafood restaurants where I live now - the Mid-Atlantic - are all about the crabs, and they don't offer fried items for the most part.


Edited by LizD518 (log)

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Hi, all!

I am from India. We have a great local dish here, from state Maharashtra known as "Kande Pohe" for morning breakfast.

Loving it. Yummy! :raz: Get this dish more delicious with a sip of hot tea.

Recipe below:

http://www.tarladalal.com/Kanda-Pohe-%28-Mumbai-Roadside-Recipes-%29-33444r

Alankar, it is nice to see a dish that is not on the standard "Indian Restaurant Menu". What are beaten rice flakes like? Are they crunchy like a breakfast cereal, or soft like cream of wheat or oatmeal?

I'm from the northeastern US, New Hampshire, originally; and the seafood would definitely be the regional specialty. Most people would say lobster, and although it is tasty and delicious, I love getting fried bay scallops when I go out for seafood. In fact, fried seafood of all kinds seem to be a local specialty - clams, scallops, haddock or cod, shrimp, etc... The seafood restaurants where I live now - the Mid-Atlantic - are all about the crabs, and they don't offer fried items for the most part.

HI, sorry, for being attaching with you late.

These rice flakes are soft. And are prepared by pressing the wet rice and then drying it up.

You just try it once!

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