Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sour Tomatillo Pickle Achar


Recommended Posts

Sour Tomatillo Achar

Made this one up from a recipe for lemons. It really works for tomatilloes. A unique spice mix, and really sour for a 'different' type of pickle, or achar. It is based on a Marwari recipe - from the arid north-western part of India. Tomatilloes are not used in India (or at least not much) but are quite productive plants in my garden while lemons or other sour fruits are not possible to grow here. No vinegar or lemon juice is used, because tomatilloes are very acidic and don't need any extra.

Ingredients
3 lbs tomatilloes husks removed and quartered
1/4 cup salt
1 Tbs black mustard seeds
2 star anise buds
10 dried chilies (I used very hot yellow peppers)
1 tsp fenugreek seeds
2 inch ginger (ground to a paste)
2 TBL dark brown sugar
1/2 cup sugar

1. In a large bowl, put the tomatilloes and sprinkle salt over them. Cover it and leave for a day, mixing occasionally.

2. Next day drain the tomatilloes.

3. Dry roast the star anise (put in first as these take longer, the black mustard, and the chilie pods (add last and barely brown in places). Cool.

4. Grind the roasted spices with the fenugreek and put aside.

5. Add tomatilloes, ginger, sugars, and everything else to a large pan and heat to boiling.

6. Cook till fully hot and boiling.

7. Fill half-pint jars and seal.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By shain
      Creamy pasta with a spicy pungent flavor.
      Best served with a bold red wine or a dark ale.
       
      Serves four.
       
      Mustard must be added to taste, I find the acidity to be the limiting factor, rather than its pungency, but if your mustard is very strong, you may need to use less and add a touch of vinegar.
       
      400 g dried fettuccine or other wide pasta, or better, an equivalent amount of fresh egg pasta 250-300 champignon or other mushrooms, sliced thinly 3 tsp butter 1 medium onion, diced 4 garlic cloves, minced A small amount of chili 400g spinach leaves, stems removed, cut into ribbons Apx 1/4 cup half and half, or a bit less full fat cream 4-8 tsp Dijon mustard (add to taste), you can include some grainy mustard if you have it at hand Optional: 1 tsp nutritional yeast or a touch of MSG, if you like using it Optional: 1/2 to 1.5 tsp honey or dark brown sugar Salt to taste A generous grating of nutmeg Plenty of black pepper  
       
      Cook mushrooms with some of the butter over high heat until lightly browned. Set aside. Add more of the butter and fry the onion until golden. Add remaining butter, garlic and chili. Fry briefly until aromatic. Cook the pasta very al dente. Drain well. Add it along with the mushroom, spinach and cream. Heat over low flame, until the spinach is wilting. Add mustard to taste, optional nutritional yeast or msg, optional honey or sugar, salt. All to taste. Add vinegar only if needed, add nutmeg. Plate and grind pepper on top.  

    • By Druckenbrodt
      So, our flights have been booked for next Sunday, we're servicing our loyal bikes, the panier bags are coming out of the cupboard and we're checking the tent still has all its poles.
      Our plan is 10 days of cycling, through the Pelopponnese and Crete, far from the madding crowds, through mountain meadows and forests full of bee hives, with regular visits to pristine hidden beaches. That's the plan.
      Of course, to make our holiday perfect, some feasting would go down well. I had thought that this would be impossible for my boyfriend, given he's vegetarian (no fish either), since I assumed the options will only be grilled meat, grilled fish, or Greek salad. But having had a look at some of these posts, it seems like there are quite a few really delicious (and popular?) dishes that don't involve meat or fish, but do include delicious things like spinach, fava beans, chick peas etc.
      So, I'd like to compile a list of Great Greek Dishes that vegetarians can eat, the sort of simple everyday stuff that we might be able to get in a small village taverna. To kick start the list I'm nominating:
      Briam - I had this about 10 years ago on the island of Amorgos and it was mindblowingly delicious. Potatoes, courgettes, tomatoes and maybe onions and lots of olive oil? All cooked together extremely slowly. I've tried recreating this but never succeeded. It's something I still have fond memories of!
      Any general advice or additions to the list would be most gratefully appreciated!
    • By Ling
      Ling's Favourite Brownies (revised 08/22/05)
      Serves 10 as Dessert.
      I've been playing around with my brownie recipe for a few months, and I'm pretty happy with this version. Not only is it easy to put together, but it produces the densest, fudgiest brownies I've ever tasted.
      I've used both Scharffen Berger and Valrhona for this recipe. Use whichever chocolate you like, as long as it's of good quality.
      5 oz unsweetened Scharffen Berger chocolate 3 oz bittersweet (70%) Scharffen Berger or Valrhona Guanaja 2 c granulated sugar 1 c butter 1 T vanilla extract 4 eggs 1 c flour (dip and sweep) 2 T cocoa powder 1/2 tsp salt 1. Melt the butter and both types of chocolate over medium heat in a saucepan.
      2. Beat eggs in mixing bowl with a hand mixer on high speed for 4 minutes, until pale.
      3. Gradually add sugar and vanilla extract.
      4. Temper the eggs with the chocolate mixture, then add all of the mixture into the bowl.
      5. Slowly incorporate the flour, salt, and cocoa. Beat the batter vigorously with a wooden spoon for about 30 seconds until the batter looks shiny.
      6. Pour batter into an ungreased, non-stick pan (I use a 9" cake round, and this fits perfectly.) Smooth the top of the batter.
      7. Bake in a pre-heated 325 degree oven for approximately 25 minutes (there should be moist crumbs on the skewer when testing for doneness).
      "Serves 10" is just an estimate--the brownies are quite rich, so some may be satisfied with just a sliver. However, if you're like me, half the pan will be gone before you know it. 😉
      Keywords: Dessert, Easy, Chocolate, Snack, Brownies/Bars, American
      ( RG1291 )
    • By Ling
      Ling's Favourite Brownies (revised 08/22/05)
      Serves 10 as Dessert.
      I've been playing around with my brownie recipe for a few months, and I'm pretty happy with this version. Not only is it easy to put together, but it produces the densest, fudgiest brownies I've ever tasted.
      I've used both Scharffen Berger and Valrhona for this recipe. Use whichever chocolate you like, as long as it's of good quality.
      5 oz unsweetened Scharffen Berger chocolate 3 oz bittersweet (70%) Scharffen Berger or Valrhona Guanaja 2 c granulated sugar 1 c butter 1 T vanilla extract 4 eggs 1 c flour (dip and sweep) 2 T cocoa powder 1/2 tsp salt 1. Melt the butter and both types of chocolate over medium heat in a saucepan.
      2. Beat eggs in mixing bowl with a hand mixer on high speed for 4 minutes, until pale.
      3. Gradually add sugar and vanilla extract.
      4. Temper the eggs with the chocolate mixture, then add all of the mixture into the bowl.
      5. Slowly incorporate the flour, salt, and cocoa. Beat the batter vigorously with a wooden spoon for about 30 seconds until the batter looks shiny.
      6. Pour batter into an ungreased, non-stick pan (I use a 9" cake round, and this fits perfectly.) Smooth the top of the batter.
      7. Bake in a pre-heated 325 degree oven for approximately 25 minutes (there should be moist crumbs on the skewer when testing for doneness).
      "Serves 10" is just an estimate--the brownies are quite rich, so some may be satisfied with just a sliver. However, if you're like me, half the pan will be gone before you know it. 😉
      Keywords: Dessert, Easy, Chocolate, Snack, Brownies/Bars, American
      ( RG1291 )
    • By Smarmotron
      What sorts of mustards do you like? The type of mustard I like is pungent without a hint of sweetness (fie upon honey mustards), but not too vinegary. Inglehoffer's Stone Ground tends to be rather good, but it's got a little too much vinegar (overpowers the taste of the mustard). What sorts of mustards do you like? Any brands? Or do you make your own?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...