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loki

Vietnamese Pickled Small Eggplant (Aubergine) Recipe?

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I am growing small eggplants (I'm trying several varieties that are early - even some other related species) this year and hope to make a condiment I purchase at a Vietnamese / Cambodian market nearby. I suspect these are popular all over Southeast Asia. It's pickled small whole eggplants in a sweet and sour sauce with quite a bite. They are crunchy and addictive. They make a great addition to meals, Southeast Asian or not, especially with rice. Here's a link to a site that sells them http://www.shoptheeast.com/buy-preserved-pickled/1118-roxy-trading-pickled-eggplant-with-chili-in-vinegar-16-oz-051299161316.html Vinegar is missing from the ingredients, and I'm pretty sure it's there - or they fermented them (but they don't seem too fermented to me).

There are actually several types I've bought, some with shrimp, some with fish, all are good. I want to make the simplest version first. If I get no response I'll post my experiments. I've found what seems a similar recipe for just shrimp (it has the same ingredients listed on the jar).

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My grandmother makes these all the time and they keep forever. I have no idea what she uses for the brine, but it seems like it's some mixture of fish sauce, salt, sugar, and vinegar, with a few chili peppers thrown in

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Well, I did not have great success with growing these types of eggplants.  This year I also cut down on what I grew so did not even try.  So I don't have an update on making these.  I am growing some orange eggplants - variety is called Cookstown Orange - which is a different species (not Solanum melongena, but it's questionable which species it actually is).  I may try to make some version of this with these.

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I finally have the results...  I used the green cherry tomatoes instead of the eggplants. The texture is different but the taste is there, and it's pretty good. I found Vietnamese recipes out there and I translated and used my pickling knowledge to fill in the mistranslated parts. I also added my own changes to make it suit me. One of the key steps is a natural ferment which produces the sourness (not vinegar - lactic acid fermentation). This is very like my favorite sweet gherkin recipe - except the spices/flavorings are very different!  The original recipes call for red chile, but I had fresh green and used that instead.  I think I could make the other types of this condiment based on this recipe - some have shrimp, some soy products, etc.

 

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/149474-vietnamese-pickled-eggplant/

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Thanks so much for persevering, and for posting your results! 

 

Question: if using green cherry tomatoes instead of the little white eggplants (admittedly rare), do you still pierce and/or cut the tomatoes, or leave them whole? 

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