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Cook-Off 63: Summer Squash


David Ross
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I like to make this recipe from Jaymes a lot   http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145452-cook-off-63-summer-squash/?p=1926847  It's found on the first page of this thread.  I could eat a whole pan of it lol.

 

 

Thanks for letting me know.  It really is the number-one way we've fixed squash in our family for generations.  My granny would be pleased.

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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They're still a'comin' :)  I'm really going to miss them, though, when they are gone.  It's nice having a fresh veg on hand at all times.

 

I've made quiche, fritters, and more spag. sauce.  And, this blueberry zuke sour cream bread.  It tastes like a blueberry muffin.

 

 

photo 1.JPG

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Newest and greatest discovery:  Venison meatballs using shredded zucchini.  Along with the zuke I did the usual bread/milk soak.  OMG these were the fluffiest, most tender meatballs I've ever made.  I'm going to vacuum pack them and make more.

 

photo 1.JPG

 

photo 2.JPG

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Shelby, I'm going to try zucchini in meatballs! I used it in place of celery in a meatloaf once when I was cooking for my grandchildren at their house and was informed that "we don't like celery".  Everyone liked the meatloaf but I cannot honestly remember it being better than my usual recipe. 

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Shelby, I thought of you when I saw this recipe - Courgette and Apple Chutney - because it uses 'overgrown' zucchini and green tomatoes, both of which I thought you might have toward the end of the season. Also some apples or crabapples.

 

I wish I could say that I had tried it and could recommend it, but it does sound appealing. I'm not sure I would cook it as long as they do, I like a chunky chutney. And of course you can always play with the spices. 

 

I might try making a mini-batch of it, if I have time and the right produce in the next week or two. I love chutney. 

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Very nice Shelby, I love venison meatballs....one of my favorite comfort foods.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 10 months later...

Zucchini & minced pork (pan-fried) w/ rice.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/151568-dinner-2015-part-4/page-10#entry2024806

 

Zucchini blossoms, baby zucchini, roasted vermicelli, scallions and cremini soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/151568-dinner-2015-part-4/?view=findpost&p=2023838

 

Baby zucchini w/ blossoms; stuffed w/ ricotta + chopped chives, battered, deep-fried.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/151568-dinner-2015-part-4/?view=findpost&p=2022423

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/151304-dinner-2015-part-3/?view=findpost&p=2020573

 

Sautéed/browned halved baby zucchini w/ pan-fried pork Schnecken & angel hair pasta tossed w/ pan residues, summer savory, zucchini blossoms.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/151304-dinner-2015-part-3/?view=findpost&p=2019827

 

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  • 1 year later...

Love this topic - makes me feel ambitious every summer!

 

I've been meaning to try zucchini butter/jam ever since I read about it on one of Kerry Beal & Anna N's Manitoulin blogs.  Haven't gotten around to it yet, sadly.

 

And tooling around on Saveur, there's this zucchini crisp recipe.  I'm intrigued, but perhaps not ambitious enough to make a sweet zucchini dessert (not counting loaf). O.o  Anyone tried it?

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22 minutes ago, Beebs said:

Love this topic - makes me feel ambitious every summer!

 

I've been meaning to try zucchini butter/jam ever since I read about it on one of Kerry Beal & Anna N's Manitoulin blogs.  Haven't gotten around to it yet, sadly.

 

And tooling around on Saveur, there's this zucchini crisp recipe.  I'm intrigued, but perhaps not ambitious enough to make a sweet zucchini dessert (not counting loaf). O.o  Anyone tried it?

It would probably be awesome.  I've been thinking of making an "apple" (using zukes) pie......

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I SWORE this wasn't going to happen to me again this year LOL (look away Huiray).  I'm getting ready to make a huge batch of venison meatballs...but that won't make much of a dent.  The one on the left was a sneaky guy.  Really enjoying having them, though.  So nice to have fresh veggies at my fingertips.

 

photo.JPG

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My squash did very little this year. First time I've ever seen zucchini that didn't produce. Of course, the month I was  unable to tend the garden took its toll. I'll be giving it a whirl again next year, with a better-tilled and better-weed-controlled garden.

 

My very favorite summer squash dish is also about the simplest; yellow crooknecks, sliced horizontally and sauteed with sliced onions and a sprinkle of Lawry's seasoned salt until tender, but retaining their shape. I could eat a full dinner plate of that alone. 

 

pork loin and apples.jpg

Sauteed squash at 10-11 o'clock.

 

I also love zucchini fritters, another very simple recipe -- two medium grated zucchini, a sleeve of Saltines, crushed, two eggs and a splash of milk, dropped by spoonsful into 1/4 inch of hot oil and pan-fried until golden. A favorite with my kids.

 

veggie dinner.JPG

Zucchini fritter at 8 o'clock.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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7 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

Yeah, on the Garden thread, many are reporting poor or no yields from these usually prolific squash plants that will inundate the gardener. I hope this is not a trend that will continue, and I wonder what's going on here???

Funny you should mention this. In the most recent issue of Southern Living magazine, their "Grumpy Gardener" column received almost the same question. The reader couldn't understand why his zucchini plants, which had oodles of flowers, didn't produce any zucchini. Grumpy said sometimes you get a male zucchini plant which produces flowers but no zucchini. It's the female plant that grows the zucchinis. Basically, Grumpy told the reader they were out of luck for this year and to replant next year and hope you get female plants.

Who knew? O.o

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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A vegetable start vendor at Farmers Market suggested the issue was lack of pollination and that I might have to get the paint brush out and get those male and female bits together. I'd yanked the plant out by then....  Those little stunted then rotting zukes are SO frustrating

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12 hours ago, Toliver said:

Funny you should mention this. In the most recent issue of Southern Living magazine, their "Grumpy Gardener" column received almost the same question. The reader couldn't understand why his zucchini plants, which had oodles of flowers, didn't produce any zucchini. Grumpy said sometimes you get a male zucchini plant which produces flowers but no zucchini. It's the female plant that grows the zucchinis. Basically, Grumpy told the reader they were out of luck for this year and to replant next year and hope you get female plants.

Who knew? O.o

 

Why would it be happening this year to so many gardeners? Also the pollination thing? I know the bee population is sadly diminishing here, but why this year, for the first time I've ever heard of? Also, some areas are getting the usual inundation, and some areas are getting zippo. I'm enjoying more zucchini than I can comfortably keep up with compliments of gardener friends and family. We have had adequate rain here this year, but even in our past drought years, with irrigation, it was still more than anyone could keep up with. I still say this is a very weird year for zucchini in some parts. I hope it's not a fungus or something.

 

Also, I think a single plant can produce male flowers and female flowers. If the flower has a nascent zucchini fruit behind it, that's your female. Here's a link to a YouTube video on hand pollinating zukes in a greenhouse with no natural pollinators. 

 

I love the name "Grumpy Gardener", but I think he may be wrong in this case. :)

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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I think the Grumpy Gardener should do a little more research.

Individual zucchini plants are monoecious, as are other squash, and have both male and female flowers and require a pollinating agent. There is a condition, first-fruit dominance, where male flowers dominate due to developing fruit suppressing subsequent female flower development.

I have noticed a decreased production this season and have also noticed a decline in the number of bees. In the early season there were a lot of bees to the extent that when I went out to harvest early morning most  flowers  had a bee. Not the case anymore.

 

 

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I know it's stew. What KIND of stew?

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  • 10 months later...

some where on eG Ive mentioned this before :

 

Summer Squash  

 

and zucchini etc

 

of the like

 

don't really appeal to me

 

so much water to deal with !

 

etc.

 

however , if you have a Cuisinart

 

consider this blade as an add on :

 

it does match-sticks

 

http://www.ereplacementparts.com/cuisinart-parts-c-147322.html

 

Im not sure if this is the place Ive used in the past

 

you have to do a little bit or work your self 

 

suprise.gif.c57431d65b89d528a808b66abb83237d.gif

 

Cuisinart DLC-833TXAMZ 3-by-3mm Medium Square Julienne Disc, Fits 7 and 11-Cup Processorsir?t=egulletcom-20&l=am2&o=1&a=B00004S9C

 

you have to look for your own price

 

Why ?

 

you make slaw at the last minute w SS and all sorts of other veg

 

at the last minute , please

 

the dress a la Salad.

 

much better than all those other preps of SS

 

also

 

https://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-DLC-842TX-Thin-Slicing-Disc/dp/B000EZUWHC

 

Im not sure this is the thinnest slicer 

 

but the thinnest slicer is a marvel  w 

 

your produce.

Edited by Smithy
Adjusted link to be Amazon-friendly (log)
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