Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

David Ross

Cook-Off 63: Summer Squash

Recommended Posts

kayb   

Hard for me to get past the old standard, sauteed with onion. Though I love the small ones, both yellow and zucchini, split in half, brushed with olive oil, sprinkled with salt and pepper, and grilled. 

 

And of course, zucchini fritters. The summer's first will be for dinner tonight.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
helenjp   

Yup, zucchini are surprisingly sensitive to weather and pollinators - in NZ, they grew like weeds; in Japan, it can often be too cold and rainy (onset of monsoon) or too hot, though I'm not sure whether it's the pollinators or the zucchini that are suffering the most.

Didn't see this thread until after dinner, sadly. We had zuke on zuke:
1. Zucchini chunks cored, then stuffed with a mix of ground chicken, crumbled tofu, and a bit of leftover chickpea dal, flavored with thyme and the cumin from the dal. Ends dusted with cornflour and fried on both ends.
2. Clear chicken soup with the cores from the zucchini and a little parsley. Very simple.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shelby   
13 minutes ago, helenjp said:

Yup, zucchini are surprisingly sensitive to weather and pollinators - in NZ, they grew like weeds; in Japan, it can often be too cold and rainy (onset of monsoon) or too hot, though I'm not sure whether it's the pollinators or the zucchini that are suffering the most.

Didn't see this thread until after dinner, sadly. We had zuke on zuke:
1. Zucchini chunks cored, then stuffed with a mix of ground chicken, crumbled tofu, and a bit of leftover chickpea dal, flavored with thyme and the cumin from the dal. Ends dusted with cornflour and fried on both ends.
2. Clear chicken soup with the cores from the zucchini and a little parsley. Very simple.

Hi Helen!

 

If I recall, you are in Asia somewhere????

 

I will have at least 3 more months of squash to eat.  I bump this thread every year because it inspires me and people always add new ideas :)

 

How long did you fry your stuffed zucchini?  Did you do it in oil?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
helenjp   

I just put a little oil on the bottom of the pan. The cooking time was shorter than for a really meat-heavy filling, because the tofu keeps it lighter, and also the tofu doesn't really need cooking. Once the tops and bottoms were browned, I added just a little water and put a lid on, barely cracked, and steamed them a few minutes until they were slightly soft but still a nice green.

I'm in Japan.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shelby   
Posted (edited)

We have a ton of venison burger that I need to use and also the usual glut of zucchini  so, I am making tons of meatballs and freezing them.  SO handy.  I used 3-4 lbs of venison and  grated two large zucchini along with a panade of homemade bread crumbs and milk.  Also grated two onions, a bunch of garlic, finely diced fresh dill, oregano, Lawry's salt, lots of black pepper and grated parmesan cheese.  I browned them first and then put them in the CSO to bake at 350F for 5 minutes.  They are now in the freezer on a parchment covered cookie sheet and I will vac. pack them later today.  I will be doing this again over next few days so that I have a lot for the coming winter :)

 

After I grate the zucchini, I squeeze some of the water out but you don't want to get it all out because it makes the lightest, most tender meatballs ever.

 

IMG_3626.JPG.3625871421d8837b6a2a358c26b44d2d.JPG

IMG_3627.JPG.b1d3457445f7dc16fdcf73525e4e6886.JPG

 

IMG_3629.JPG.8ba500a426351b054387eb3e444c8be8.JPG


Edited by Shelby (log)
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Smithy   

Those meatballs look wonderful, Shelby.  Thanks for the zucchini tip.  I fear my venison access is limited, but I'd give that technique a try with other meat as well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rotuts   

@Shelby 

 

Nice , sort of .

 

maybe if the MB's are '  well seasoned '  

 

no one will notice the Zoooks ?

 

suprise.gif.903bfb8574cb9b082d9f2e5884b13e23.gif

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rotuts   

@Shelby 

 

at least you got rid of those

 

Zoooks

 

in your own Back Yard !

 

[ed.: No Comment ]

 

at least  you did not Motor Down the Highway

 

and dump them at your Least Best Friends !

 

Ouch on that Pay Back

 

just saying

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shelby   
1 minute ago, rotuts said:

@Shelby 

 

at least you got rid of those

 

Zoooks

 

in your own Back Yard !

 

[ed.: No Comment ]

 

at least  you did not Motor Down the Highway

 

and dump them at your Least Best Friends !

 

Ouch on that Pay Back

 

just saying

It was touch and go for a bit....the campground narrowly escaped an anonymous zuke leaving.

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rotuts   

@Shelby 

 

OK  you have the right idea

 

Im sure those Campers , Happy or Not

 

are looking forward to your EggPlants !

 

and then there is this :

 

 
 
 
↵ Use original player
YouTube
← Replay
X
i
 

 

 

 

All that work in the garden ?

 

personally I see a few Jugs of M.R. as

 

being tastier

 

up to you !

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a middle-eastern twist on Shelby's venison-zucchini meatballs, Ottolenghi has a recipe on his site for turkey-zucchini meatballs with a sumac/yogurt sauce. I am not a huge ground turkey fan, nor do I often have zucchini hanging around in the fridge, but this sounds like a good way to juice up meatballs made with lean meats.

 

This evening I am making a pizza that I normally wouldn't make, but this one fits the bill, since all the ingredients are locally at peak right now and I am currently tomato challenged and need one "white" pizza. It's called "Corn Zucchini and Candied Jalapeño Pizza." Go figure. My husband makes a great crust and I have some beautiful fresh mozz so it can't be too bad, right? I am using a zucchini and one yellow summer squash and probably will sub out the jalapeños for poblanos that I roasted the other day, although candied jalapeños does have a nice ring to it. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to put a little grated zucchini that has most of the water pressed out into cheese and onion enchiladas to lighten them up a bit. I got the idea from Torero's Mexican Retaurant here in Cary that uses zucchini as part of a veggie medley they put into their vegetarian cheese enchiladas. I put it in uncooked, and by the time the cheese is melted, it is fine.

 

My favorite way with zucchini is planks either grilled over charcoal or dusted in flour and fried. I can eat a surprising amount of it either way.

 

There used to be an appetizer dish at Ramada Inn in Memphis that was called Zucchini Lyonnaise that was nothing more than zucchini and onions cooked in an individual casserole dish with butter and salt. I became a regular at the bar during summer time, always ordering this dish and a few margaritas. Then I would stroll out to the pool, take off my street clothes in the ladies room and stuff them into my gym bag, taking out the towel I'd brought from home. I had worn a swimsuit underneath, and then I would swim in their pool like I owned the place. My story to the chatty bartender was that I came into town frequently on business. It didn't hurt that I tipped well. This strategy was so effective, that the bartender eventually told me to pick up the phone at poolside and order my drinks brought out there, and they could be charged to my (non-existent) room. xD Needless to say, I declined. I got up to some stuff when I was younger, but nothing that ever hurt anyone.

 

I've tried several times to make this zucchini lyonnaise, but mine never comes out as delicious as theirs. I think I have a tendency to overcook it a little. Theirs was quite al dente. Or perhaps it's just that I was always dieting and famished back then. This was the lowest calorie appetizer they had. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Shelby just watching The Kitchen on Food Network as my houseguest, Zoe the dachshund, seems to be fascinated by the food.

Two recipes you can check out on their website that looked good were:

Zucchini Pickled Noodles

Zucchini Pizza Bites

 

now they are doing a S'mores Ice box pie.....NOOOOOOOOOOOOO

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shelby   

Have had a late onslaught of squash.  I made some relish--shown on the preserving thread and now I am going to make a bunch of bread. 

 

Zucchini banana cream cheese bread.

 

59b9267273732_FullSizeRender36.jpg.7a20451db524143ac305e2c3735eabcb.jpg

IMG_3733.JPG.b6dadf726dee7a6d5624c124870c755e.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Courgette cutlets
       
      I found the recipe for courgette cutlets at www.gotujzcukiereczkiem.pl. It appealed to me at once for three reasons. Firstly, the courgette is my favourite vegetable. Secondly, cutlets, pancakes and crumpets are my children's favourites dishes. Thirdly, this dish is fast, simple and is always a success. You must not use FB while frying, because it may end with you ordering pizza for dinner 

      The cutlets are mild and their flavour is spiced up with feta cheese. You can complement them with your favourite herbs. In my kitchen there is always basil, dill, peppermint, rosemary and thyme. This time I chose dill (in accordance with the recipe) and thyme.

      Ingredients:
      400g of courgette
      1 egg
      150g of feta cheese
      110g of breadcrumbs (+ 4 tablespoons for the batter)
      2 tablespoons of minced dill
      1 tablespoon of thyme
      salt and pepper

      Wash the courgette and grate it. Add salt and leave it in a bowl for 15 minutes. Drain it then mix in the egg, feta cheese, breadcrumbs and herbs. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Make small cutlets with the mixture and fry in oil. Serve with natural yoghurt.
       
       

    • By Bijay@Sugar Daddy Bakes
      I am a Baker and Cake Decorator in India. India has a huge Vegetarian Population that does not even eat eggs/gelatin. So I am constantly looking at finding vegetarian options.
       
      Issue at Hand:
      Regular Butter Cream - American Butter Cream ( Icing Sugar 10X + Butter + Milk/Lemon Juice / Cream) is an option ..and a lot of decorators use this as it sets hard, and they also add shortening into it ..and I am like , Nope I can't eat that , much less serve it. Its too Sweet /Gritty and Crusts and just tasteless. It has also made sure that people in my country to completely throw out any butter cream cake . You say Butter Cream and they say - too Sweet/gritty.
      I have been successful in the last two years to break that impression by making European Meringue based butter cream - I love Swiss Meringue Butter Cream . It is smooth, just sweet enough , takes colour well, pipes well , and is mostly temperature stable. But I can't serve it to people who don't eat eggs.
      I have so far been making a substitute - Ermine/Rue/Cooked Butter Cream - a Flour + Milk+ Sugar custard (AKA Pastry Cream minus the eggs) and whipping butter into it. It tastes good - people like it ..nut its a misery to work with - will not hold shape , will not colour well , and most of all weeps and weeps some more when we chill the cakes.
       
      So I am looking for suggestions on finding a starch that will not weep  when frozen in a custard? And my second approach is to move to Aqua Faba to build the meringue and make SMBC. The starch custard option is easy and economical and does not leave me with mountains of Chickpeas .
       
      would  love to hear thoughts . 
       
      Thanks  
    • By Kasia
      Creamy soup with broad beans
       
      During my last visit to the fruit and vegetable market I bought so many broad beans that I didn't want to risk cooking everything at once. I prepared a rich, creamy soup with them. The green soup, served with a bit of thick yoghurt and nigella, was very tasty.
       
      Ingredients (for 5 people):
      1 kg of broad beans
      half an onion
      1 clove of garlic
      1 tablespoon of butter
      4 sprigs of thyme
      1 tablespoon of caraway seeds
      vegetable stock
      5 teaspoons of thick natural yoghurt
      2 teaspoons of nigella
      2 tablespoons of sunflowers seeds
      salt and pepper

      Cook the broad beans in salty water with the caraway seeds, drain and peel them. Try not to eat everything. Chop the onion and garlic and fry them in butter. Put the peeled broad beans, onion, garlic and sprigs of thyme into a saucepan. Pour in the vegetable stock to cover the vegetables and boil for 10 minutes. Take out the thyme and blend the soup to make a smooth cream. Add vegetable stock until you have the right consistence. Roast the sunflower seeds in a dry pan. Serve the soup with thick natural yoghurt, nigella and sunflower seeds.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By pat_00
      OK so it's a bit weird, but I need help making some fake animals out of tofu.
      It's for a vegetarian party, the tricky thing is i need to make it look like the real thing.
      I have a mold ready to use, but it's not really oven safe.
      My idea is to use a basic tofu meatloaf recipe, put it in the mold and chill it until it sets, then transfer it to the oven.
      Anyone have any helpful ideas, or comments?
    • By anchita
      I'd appreciate knowing more about 'vegetarian' stocks. (The "hot soups" thread in the Indian forum got me thinking about this.)
      I assume basic vegetable stock-making would involve simmering cut vegetables in water and then straining the mixture. But what about the specific combinations and proportions of vegetables, addition of herbs and spices, length of time for simmering, reduction etc.
      Beside its obvious use as the base in soups, what other uses could one put this to (assuming that it doesn't possess the thickening property of the meat-based stocks)?
      edit: I did try to see if this topic has been covered elsewhere, but didn't get a specific result. I'd appreciate any pointers to previous discussions, if any.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×