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Dinner! 2013 (Part 4)


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Thank you everyone! It was fun to enter, even more fun to win. :-)

Recipe:

I had this dish Lobster Carbonara at Maggiano's Little Italy restaurant in NY and I like it very much. As it happened, lobsters were on ½ price sale at $4.79 a lb., therefore I decided to make lobster carbonara. As far as carbonara goes, the recipe is fairly typical, but the difference of my dish was the spaghetti, which was home made and smoked. Normally it is not easy to make smoked pasta for carbonnara, because boiling takes away all the smoke flavor, and the recipe needs boiling hot pasta to cook the raw eggs.

Using my pasta machine to make the spaghetti, I first cooked the spaghetti the normal boiling way. Then it went into my electric smoker for a blast of intense cold smoke. My smoker is PID temperature controlled and has a built-in humidifier. The spaghetti came out hot, smoky and very moist to complete this recipe.

Also, the lobsters were smoked. The smoker was set at exactly 150F and the lobsters were able to be cold smoked for a long time without being overcooked.

dcarch

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dcarch - your prize-winning meal sounds even better than it looked (and it looked fantastic)

Dinner from Diana Kennedy’s The Art of Mexican Cooking

Pollo en salsa de fresadilla y chipotle – Chicken thighs simmered with water to cover, white onion, garlic, bay leaf, thyme, oregano, and a slice of lime to make stock. Remove chicken when partly cooked, strain and concentrate the stock. Boil tomatillos, puree with chipotle en adobo, and then fry the puree. Simmer chicken, stock, and sauce until done. Tangy, spicy goodness.

Chayotes al vapor – A longstanding simple favorite. Chayotes peeled, julienned, and sautéed with minced Serrano chiles. Cover, lower the heat, and then finish with chopped cilantro. I had mine with feta cheese.

Flour tortillas not pictured

p1813251483-4.jpg

Edited by C. sapidus (log)
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Pigeons (and other birds) from Four Story Hill Farm

NxlWansl.jpg

Tuiles are made by mixing powdered sugar, flour, melted butter, and water. They are spread thinly, sprinkled with roasted cacao, and baked in a 360º oven for 5 minutes.

SgAGfYNl.png

jet58C6l.jpg

X4xK2cPl.jpg

Barbajuan dough. Traditional recipe: flour, white wine...only with the addition of cocoa powder.

jS9u8zel.jpg

The filling is a mixture of red pepper, which is peeled, sliced in a fine brunoise, then stewed over very low heat;

yMyW4gVl.jpg

the liver of the pigeons (left) and chicken liver (right);

laUe56yl.jpg

the thighs of the pigeons, cut into a dice, along with diced foie gras terrine

8nvTe31l.jpg

FYTRrpbl.png

nG4EhR5l.jpg

Celery is blanched, refreshed, and all fibrous string removed.

mfCwiT3l.png

Cut into rounds...

cFsi6FKl.jpg

Cherrys are halved and pitted. The scraps are used to make a simple compote, and the halves are cooked quickly in butter, then deglazed with sherry vinegar, maple syrup, and a touch of lemon.

KS0y03wl.jpg

The pigeons were salted overnight, then seared quickly over high heat, then placed on a rack and roasted in a 400º oven for 5-6 minutes. Rest for at least 12 minutes, then reheated for 1.5 minutes in a 500º oven, carved and served.

Pmcq6Hzl.png

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Pigeons (and other birds) from Four Story Hill Farm

NxlWansl.jpg

Tuiles are made by mixing powdered sugar, flour, melted butter, and water. They are spread thinly, sprinkled with roasted cacao, and baked in a 360º oven for 5 minutes.

SgAGfYNl.png

jet58C6l.jpg

X4xK2cPl.jpg

Barbajuan dough. Traditional recipe: flour, white wine...only with the addition of cocoa powder.

jS9u8zel.jpg

The filling is a mixture of red pepper, which is peeled, sliced in a fine brunoise, then stewed over very low heat;

yMyW4gVl.jpg

the liver of the pigeons (left) and chicken liver (right);

laUe56yl.jpg

the thighs of the pigeons, cut into a dice, along with diced foie gras terrine

8nvTe31l.jpg

FYTRrpbl.png

nG4EhR5l.jpg

Celery is blanched, refreshed, and all fibrous string removed.

mfCwiT3l.png

Cut into rounds...

cFsi6FKl.jpg

Cherrys are halved and pitted. The scraps are used to make a simple compote, and the halves are cooked quickly in butter, then deglazed with sherry vinegar, maple syrup, and a touch of lemon.

KS0y03wl.jpg

The pigeons were salted overnight, then seared quickly over high heat, then placed on a rack and roasted in a 400º oven for 5-6 minutes. Rest for at least 12 minutes, then reheated for 1.5 minutes in a 500º oven, carved and served.

Pmcq6Hzl.png

That's gorgeous!

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mm84321 I have to commend you on the amount of work you put in your food. I would probably do 1/3 as much and call it a day.

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw
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Bruce, I'm guessing those are both the Dunlop recipes? The fish-fragrant eggplant is to die for. I had less luck with the dry-fried beef slivers, but will give it another go now that I'm getting the hang of true dry-frying.

Yes to both, and completely agree that fish-fragrant eggplant is wonderful stuff.

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image.jpg

Simple shrimp and vegetable stir fry with no starch component. Still satisfying.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Bruce - thanks - 'nother Dunlop question, I believe those fish-fragrant recipes call for pickled Sichuan chilli paste? Have you actually been able to obtain this product, or do you just use chilli bean paste (which is what I did)?

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Celery is blanched, refreshed, and all fibrous string removed.mfCwiT3l.png

Cut into rounds...cFsi6FKl.jpg

Would you mind explaining how you flattened the celery to be able to cut those rounds? What cuts did you make? Pictures would be especially nice (I do realize that's a lot to ask.)

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Celery is blanched, refreshed, and all fibrous string removed.mfCwiT3l.png

Cut into rounds...cFsi6FKl.jpg

Would you mind explaining how you flattened the celery to be able to cut those rounds? What cuts did you make? Pictures would be especially nice (I do realize that's a lot to ask.)

I simply sliced the celery sticks into 2-3" pieces, and then sliced off the ridges to create one flat piece. If I do it again, I will try to photograph, as it's a bit hard to explain in words.

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Bruce - thanks - 'nother Dunlop question, I believe those fish-fragrant recipes call for pickled Sichuan chilli paste? Have you actually been able to obtain this product, or do you just use chilli bean paste (which is what I did)?

Patrick – The fish-fragrant eggplant recipe calls for Sichuanese chile bean paste, so that is what I used. I have never seen pickled Sichuan chiles, but the book lists sambal oleek as a good substitute. Perhaps I should try the fish-fragrant pork again with sambal oleek.

mm - That's a very pretty dish. How did it taste?

Edited by C. sapidus (log)
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Thanks. It's a very nice dish, just time intensive.The crab is seasoned with a bit of curry, tarragon, lemon and mayonnaise, then layered over lettuce, on top of the seasoned tomato. Then another tomato, a layer of watercress, apple and avocado, another tomato, and crab again. Luckily, I was only making two.

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My wife and I went out for our anniversary to the charcoal steak house in Kitchener , Ont.

my wife had the conestogo smoked side ribs , seasonal veg, sweet potato fries..also comes with an apple marmalade that I would love to be able to duplicate . I ususally get it with the grilled pigtail app . melonberry martini

dessert creme brulee

i had the 40 day dry aged ribeye and baked potato with seasonal veg . glass of chianti then switched to a beaujolais

dessert , flourless chocolate cake with sorbet and an espresso.

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"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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Been admiring and drooling over all the meals posted for the last while.

First day back into my kitchen after a 3-week road trip that took us to Louisville Kentucky, to Niagara-on-the-Lake, Toronto, back across the border thru' Chicago before home to Manitoba.

Got inb just in time to receive a bag of fresh green beans and yellow squash. Supper tonight: grilled lamb chops that were marinated in whole grain Dijon mustard, chopped fresh rosemary, and red wine vinegar.

1Lambchops@home0693.jpg

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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