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Dinner! 2013 (Part 4)


basquecook
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Ive never been able to taste a picture, let alone tell the texture and mouth feel from that same picture.

I must be a moron. :huh:

Sure you can. You can see in a piece of meat with little to no connective tissue where there has been an over breakdown of the meat just like you can tell if something is over or under done from a picture. I laugh that the standard assumption here is that if you think something looks bad then you simply aren't familiar with the church of sous vide and must prefer eating wild dingos over a wood fire like a caveman when it might actually be a keen eye and a little experience.

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Ive never been able to taste a picture, let alone tell the texture and mouth feel from that same picture.

I must be a moron. :huh:

see is not taste.

And I didn't say I could see if it was oversalted or whatever, I said I could see the texture. Texture isn't taste either, but can be apparent to the eye.

Anyway, this has gone on long enough. I was just offering some help to dcarch on his sous vide cooking, which seems to be the best possible use of this thread. To show, to help and to improve.

Edited by sigma (log)
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Leg of rabbit, slow braised (about 8 hours) in red wine with onions, garlic, bouquet garni and a shake of dried chilli flakes; fresh straw mushrooms; rice.

There was also a side of stir fried water spinach which I forgot to picture. And the red wine sauce was served in a jug.

rabbit in red wine with straw mushrroms.jpg

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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I was back here for a while before I noticed the Like Button.

Liuzhou, I would love your dinner. Can't remember the last time I had rabbit.

Pork%20Chops%20ready%20for%20the%20grill

Local Pork - Thick pork chops presalted Thursday. Ready to go on the grill - rubbed with fresh garlic, pepper, oregano and fresh lemon juice.

Pork%20Chop%20Grilled%20September%2020th

Off the grill and resting.

Pork%20Chop%20Grilled%20September%2020th

Baked Squash, green beans and roasted potatoes.

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A few years ago my son's fiancee left in the morning for work and there was a dead rabbit in the driveway that a feral cat had killed and partially eaten. When she got home I was making dinner. She asked what was for dinner. I said rabbit. She was not amused. Actually it was a small roast.

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I was back here for a while before I noticed the Like Button.

Liuzhou, I would love your dinner. Can't remember the last time I had rabbit.

Pork%20Chops%20ready%20for%20the%20grill

Local Pork - Thick pork chops presalted Thursday. Ready to go on the grill - rubbed with fresh garlic, pepper, oregano and fresh lemon juice.

Pork%20Chop%20Grilled%20September%2020th

Off the grill and resting.

Pork%20Chop%20Grilled%20September%2020th

Baked Squash, green beans and roasted potatoes.

please tell me there is maple syrup on that squash because that would make it a perfect meal :)

"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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With the inexpensive and good quality portobello mushrooms I have been getting, stuffed shrooms have become a regular. Norm - what was your stuffing? I like them with a combo of sausage, shrimp, garlic and egg white & just a bit of breadcrumbs to bind. Cheese gets into the mix as well.

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With the inexpensive and good quality portobello mushrooms I have been getting, stuffed shrooms have become a regular. Norm - what was your stuffing? I like them with a combo of sausage, shrimp, garlic and egg white & just a bit of breadcrumbs to bind. Cheese gets into the mix as well.

Cassie does not like sausage or I sure would have added it. I like them that way. As it was I used minced mushroom stems, onion, garlic, pecans, butter, pinches of seasoned salt and Italian herbs blend, chicken stock , bread crumbs and a little cream cheese to help bind it. Topped with fresh grated Parm.

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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Beef brisket smoked for 4 1/2 hours in my wood pellet grill att 235° and then 48 hours in the sous vide water bath at 135°. Very tender and easy to slice. No shredding.

Shelly

Food as love, served with style

P1010808.jpg

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My cookbook, Feeding Alice: A Love Story is available at www.shellyskitchenpress.com

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I reverse-engineered my mother's spaghetti with meat sauce (strictly Italian-American, not Italian!) from the '70s. Strangely, she sautéed onions and garlic, browned the meat, added herbs tomatos etc. from scratch, but then dumped an entire jar of Ragu in there. I'm guessing the recipe came from the side of a Ragu bottle. This was made without any such addition, though I did put in some dried Italian Seasoning - as well as fresh basil and oregano from the garden. The secret ingredient was a pinch of pimenton de la vera. I could probably eat three or four gallons of this, so it's for the best that I don't make it all the time.

L1050410_zps5d52c916.jpg

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Actually, it is a technique I have found on a blog today and it was the first time I tried it. Certainly a very interesting technique. I roasted them seperately in olive oil with some thyme, rosemary and garlic. Not only does the flavor of the oil and herbs get deep inside the potatoes, they also roast very evenly and faster. Even though it was the first time I tried it, I think it will become my standard method.

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Wapi - it looks like the potatoes were sliced almost through thinly. If so, was it to get more of the roasting juices into them? Is this your standard method? I had not seen that technique.

looks like Hasselback potatoes. really nice to get them crispy/fluffy and one of my favorite things.

Not much cooking around here but reheating with 8 hours or so in the field. Thursday thought I had bought one of the new Campbell's pouch sauces - ginger stir fry - but it was Marsala. I had just bought shrimp and snow peas(Johnnybird has asked that we try to include more veg in our diet... :angry: something I did when I first met him). I had scallions, onions, carrots and baby mixed peppers at home along with jasmine rice. Sautéed the whites of the scallions, onions, snow peas and peppers. Cooked the julienned carrots in a bit of water to soften them then added the carrots to the mix. Removed to a bowl and then sautéed the shrimp that I had dusted with cornstarch. Deglazed the pan after removing the last of the shrimps with sherry then threw in a mix of hoisin, light soy, pinch of sugar, oyster sauce and the water the carrots had blanched in. Shrimp and veg back into the pool then served over jasmine rice with a drizzle of sesame oil.

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Sure. The soup is simply made by coloring sliced onion in a pan without fat, then adding broth (in this case, I used frozen stock from a pot au feu I made last winter!) simmering for an hour with a star anise, then infusing for another hour. The onion is colored in a pan, again, no fat, then seasoned with fleur de sel and pepper and cooked en papillote with a piece of bone marrow until quite tender (325ºF oven for maybe an hour, size of onion depending). The croutons are made by coating cubed comté in flour, eggs and breadcrumbs, then frying at around 340ºF until golden. It's a nice recipe.

Thanks! Bone marrow cooked with the onion sounds incredibly. Is it raw bone marrow, and out of the bone, or in-the-bone?

Raw marrow, out of the bone. I swore to myself I'd never take a picture of an onion again, but this was from last year, so here you go:

Thanks so much!!

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