Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

ChrisTaylor

Curing and Cooking with Ruhlman & Polcyn's "Charcuterie" (Part 7)

Recommended Posts

Damn. That duck prosciutto is impressively beautiful and delicious-looking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's salty good. Saving the second piece for an upcoming dinner, I think. In the freezer so I kind of forget about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So twice now I've attempted to make the venison terrine with cherries from this book, and both times led to heartbreaking failure when the emulsion broke or partly broke during cooking. Venison was free both times, but since it's been several years since I myself have gotten to take a deer, I must rely on the generosity of friends and family, and every scrap is precious.

So after a recent success with a similar emulsified forcemeat terrine I thought back to the venison one from this book, and realized that there was no panade of any kind--just cream, egg whites, and reduced marinade. Every single successful pate or terrine I have ever made (about 6-8) has had a bread or flour panade. The only two complete failures I've ever experienced was this recipe, which lacks it.

So what do y'all think? Coincidence? Anybody had success making the venison terrine as written? I know I won't be trying it again without some serious modification.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So twice now I've attempted to make the venison terrine with cherries from this book, and both times led to heartbreaking failure when the emulsion broke or partly broke during cooking. Venison was free both times, but since it's been several years since I myself have gotten to take a deer, I must rely on the generosity of friends and family, and every scrap is precious.

So after a recent success with a similar emulsified forcemeat terrine I thought back to the venison one from this book, and realized that there was no panade of any kind--just cream, egg whites, and reduced marinade. Every single successful pate or terrine I have ever made (about 6-8) has had a bread or flour panade. The only two complete failures I've ever experienced was this recipe, which lacks it.

So what do y'all think? Coincidence? Anybody had success making the venison terrine as written? I know I won't be trying it again without some serious modification.

I actually looked at that recipe and in my head said "That will never hold together."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So twice now I've attempted to make the venison terrine with cherries from this book, and both times led to heartbreaking failure when the emulsion broke or partly broke during cooking. Venison was free both times, but since it's been several years since I myself have gotten to take a deer, I must rely on the generosity of friends and family, and every scrap is precious.

So after a recent success with a similar emulsified forcemeat terrine I thought back to the venison one from this book, and realized that there was no panade of any kind--just cream, egg whites, and reduced marinade. Every single successful pate or terrine I have ever made (about 6-8) has had a bread or flour panade. The only two complete failures I've ever experienced was this recipe, which lacks it.

So what do y'all think? Coincidence? Anybody had success making the venison terrine as written? I know I won't be trying it again without some serious modification.

I actually looked at that recipe and in my head said "That will never hold together."

Yeah I feel kind of dumb for making it once, much less twice. But I have no shame, especially on eGullet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

I've been looking at ordering this book online but can't seem to find out if it has a recipie for Salametti. The index listed on here doesn't show it, unless it in in the Salami section? Can anyone who has the book look and let me know?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the index under Salami they have Hungarian and Tuscan. Salametti is not listed at all in the index.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am going through photos of the various items from Charcuterie that I made so far, including a bunch of them from last year's Charcutepalooza challenges.

Starting with the salt-cured items...

Fresh bacon

My advice would be to buy a lot of pork belly - at least 6 pounds, but 10 is better (just double whatever you think you will need). Your butcher will love you and you will end up giving most of it away to friends and family, plus it freezes very well (I slice it and freeze 6 slices in a ziploc bag).

7720657706_8054dc293c_z.jpg

Duck Prosciutto

This must be one of my favorite recipes from the book so far. It is fantastic with a (large) moulard breast, but any duck breast can do. Mine loses typically 30% weight at the end of the curing process, but I don't weight it anymore, I just judge by feel to determine if it needs further drying. I like to slice it super thin.

5376688689_78e6c3cb69_z.jpg

I've been making this on a regular basis for almost two years now. It's very good on its own as a little pre-dinner snack (with a cocktail of course), or as a garnish for soup (shown here with a root vegetable soup, from the Soup thread).

6570242313_70667d3382_z.jpg

Brined Pork Chops

I can't seem find a photo of the finished product, but in any case I found them too salty for my taste.

5533487641_4b2116fbd5_z.jpg

Corned Beef

This is something terribly exotic for me, having grown up in France where I had never heard of it. But it took the plunge and loved the result. The meat was extremely moist and flavorful at the end of the process. Once I had cured the corned beef, I used the recipe from Lucques to serve it (more details on the recipe in the Lucques thread).

5533498317_2f5810a3e7_z.jpg

Home-cured sauerkraut

No photos as it smelled off at the end of the (long) process with pink slime as a bonus, and I ended up throwing it away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moving on to smoked foods.

I believe the only item I've attempted in that category is the maple-cured smoked bacon. For detailed pictures of the process see on my foodblog here. It's good stuff, a little sweet for me. I still have my stovetop smoker that I've been using on my grill for non-charcuterie items (potatoes are a favorite). I need to explore this category a little more but if I remember correctly most items in the book are cold-smoked, which is not easy to do without additional equipment.

5922851372_b10ff80ccf_z.jpg

Sausages

Breakfast sausage

Inexplicably I don't have any pictures but I really liked these. The ginger-sage combination is excellent. I am not a big breakfast person but this gets me salivating. I need to make another batch soon!

As for stuffed sausages, since the sweet Italian sausage I made last year, I haven't had the energy to make them again. It is quite an involved process especially with the Kitchenaid stuffer attachment, and I don't feel that it would make sense for me to buy a dedicated stuffer. I can find excellent sausages locally and I was not crazy about the texture of the ones I made (see the grinding process here and the stuffing here). I did find that they kept very well frozen, so again my advice would be to make a double or triple batch and freeze the leftovers with each sausage individually wrapped in plastic.

5903646673_ca1b7273d7_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One the topic of sausages it is extremely bizarre to see a merguez recipe in the book which includes PORK fat. Merguez is always lamb or beef.

In the "dry-cured foods" category there is a gem. You see, since moving to the US a while ago, I have not been able to find the equivalent of Saucisson Sec here and have to rely on visits from family or friends to smuggle some for me. So I was quite excited to find a recipe for saucisson sec in the book and have been making it regularly. Again I make large batches. They make excellent gifts and last for a few months in the fridge (I like mine extra-sec).

The prep is easy. Pork shoulder and fat are fed into the meat grinder.

6325265914_a283bda35e_z.jpg

The texture should be on the coarse side with little pieces of fat still clearly visible (I used the biggest die that came with the Kitchenaid grinder, but something bigger would be even better).

6325263682_fb6f74936a_z.jpg

The seasonings are just salt and pepper, sugar, garlic and curing salt #2.

After the dreaded stuffing process (make sure you have a helper if you are using the Kitchenaid stuffing attachment), they are ready to go in the curing chamber (aka spare fridge) for a month or so.

6324508013_6d6713bd1f_z.jpg

Amazing how fresh pork can transform into this after a few weeks.

6570152957_019c8189d2_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unbeknownst to me I've been doing charcuterie for most of my life- but on the BBQ side. As a result of watching the "American Heartland" episode of NR I bought Ruhlman and Polcyn's book "Charcuterie" and the Marianski Bros' "Home Production of Quality Meats and Sausages". As soon as it came out I had "Salumi" shipped to me. I am very late to this side of the game!

Bought a separate mixer, grinder and 5# stuffer which is the only way to go in my book.

Have made countless batches of sausage and smoked, poached and #1 cured to my hearts content. I must say that Ruhlman's "Master Garlic Sausage" recipe is exemplary. Make it a lot and this as it is a good base for fresh sausage. Bacon, pancetta, guanciale and filleto are staples now in my kitchen. Pate and rilletes as well though this is not made nearly enough!

What I want to do ultimately is fermented sausage which to me is the pinnacle of the craft. I'm just waiting on figuring out the starter culture and getting my fermentation chamber dialed in.

A pic of one of my fermentation chambers:

20121108_153116.jpg

The problem with a chest freezer is that the humidity levels can remain very high due to when opening the lid as air does not flow out. I have quite a bit of damp-rid and salt in there to absorb moisture- think I can maintain 65% humidity now. Also- one should be careful when "squeezing" the meat early on as a gauge for doneness as mold can develop- contaminated even by clean fingers! I bought a spray bottle that is filled with vinegar to combat any of the nasties. Might investigate light smoking prior to placing in the chamber...

I'm very passionate about this pursuit. My family accepts my gifts of charcuterie only to humor me I'm afraid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Home-cured sauerkraut

No photos as it smelled off at the end of the (long) process with pink slime as a bonus, and I ended up throwing it away.

That's a shame: I've made the home-cured Sauerkraut and really enjoyed it. The texture was much better than canned or jarred products, and you have a lot more control over the level of sourness. Did you keep it properly submerged in the brine? What temperature were you fermenting at?

One the topic of sausages it is extremely bizarre to see a merguez recipe in the book which includes PORK fat. Merguez is always lamb or beef.

Not to mention the inclusion of red wine... clearly a merguez-inspired sausage, not the real deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Home-cured sauerkraut

No photos as it smelled off at the end of the (long) process with pink slime as a bonus, and I ended up throwing it away.

That's a shame: I've made the home-cured Sauerkraut and really enjoyed it. The texture was much better than canned or jarred products, and you have a lot more control over the level of sourness. Did you keep it properly submerged in the brine? What temperature were you fermenting at?

Submerged in brine, room temperature, protected from light (in a cupboard).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone hot smoked their home made bacon twice?

I like my smoke but I dont have a cold smoker, and my hot smoker is one of those stainless-steel fish smokers about the size of a medium apple packaging box. I smoke plenty of trout in it, about 30 mins for them, but I am a little worried it might get the bacon too hot too quickly.

So I was wondering, could you smoke until the internal temp reaches 65 deg cel, remove, cool, chill in fridge overnight and do the process again.

I guess I could freeze or semi-freeze the bacon before smoking, which in theory would mean it would take longer to get to 65 deg cel internal, therefore more time in the smoke.

On second thoughts, I have never tried turning the alcohol burning flame down...which might work, but might also just produce less smoke too.

Looking forward to my first bacon which is currently curing!

Luke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Luke, do you have an outdoor grill, like a weber? you could try to coldsmoke in there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guanciale from a Tamworth hog. Cured with salt, pepper, rosemary and garlic. Left in the utility fridge (no defrost cycle) for about three weeks. P1000529(1).JPG

Mulberry smoked bacon from same hog. P1000502(1).JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I notice that there is a revised and updated version of the book coming out soon.

Does anyone have any ideas of how much it is revised and updated?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A recent 7-pound batch of fresh (unsmoked) bacon. Great stuff. I use some of it right away, give some to friends, and freeze the rest.

10450621526_a565711e75_z.jpg

10636636474_3d0e74fa04_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that looks so tasty.

but if its un smoked and not brined its really pork belly? Id love some of that!

not being a Utzz :biggrin:

what did you do with the slices?


Edited by rotuts (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that looks so tasty.

but if its un smoked and not brined its really pork belly? Id love some of that!

not being a Utzz :biggrin:

what did you do with the slices?

Well it's cured, so it's bacon.

Some slices were diced and used as a garnish for soup. Most were fried for breakfast. Some went into quiche lorraine. My friends snatched the rest.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made two different sausages over the weekend. The breakfast sausages from Charcuterie and, from another book, the Daylesford Bull-Boar. The latter is a sausage unique to a small region in the old goldfields in my state. It's based on a traditional style of sausage brought over by Swiss-Italian migrants during the gold rush. As the name suggests it combines beef and pork. It's heavily spiced and jacked with red wine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By boilsover
      Solid intermediate cook, here.  Not especially intimidated by elaborate preps.  But I'm new to SV, and would like a recommendation for a cookbook for guidance and exploration.
       
      I was thinking of Tom Keller's Under Pressure, but I'm wondering if the preps he includes may not be the most generally useful.  What do you all like, and why?
       
      Thanks!
    • By Chris Hennes
      On Nov. 7, 2017, Modernist Bread will finally arrive on my doorstep. Having preordered it literally the first day it was available, to say I'm excited about this book is a bit of an understatement. The team at The Cooking Lab have been gracious enough to give @Dave the Cook and me early electronic access to the book and so I've spent the last week pouring over it. I'm just going to start with a few initial comments here (it's 2600 pages long, so a full review is going to take some time, and require a bunch of baking!). Dave and I would also be happy to answer any questions you've got.
       
      One of the main things I've noticed about this book is a change in tone from the original Modernist Cuisine. It comes across as less "everything you know is wrong" and more "eighty bazillion other bakers have contributed to this knowledge and here's our synthesis of it." I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that Myhrvold and company are now the most experienced bread-bakers in the world. Not necessarily in terms of the number of identical loaves they've produced, but in the shear number of different recipes and techniques they've tried and the care with which they've analyzed the results. These volumes are a distillation of 100,000 years of human breadmaking experience, topped off with a dose of the Modernist ethos of taking what we know to the next level.
       
      The recipes include weight, volume, and baker's percentages, and almost all of them can be made by both a home baker and someone baking in a commercial facility. The home baker might need to compromise on shape (e.g. you can't fit a full-length baguette in most home ovens) but the book provides clear instructions for both the amateur and professional. The recipes are almost entirely concentrated in volumes 4 and 5, with very few in the other volumes (in contrast to Modernist Cuisine, where there were many recipes scattered throughout). I can't wait for the physical volumes to arrive so that I can have multiple volumes open at once, the recipes cross-reference techniques taught earlier quite frequently.
    • By Chris Hennes
      I just got a copy of Grace Young's "Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge"—I enjoyed cooking from "Breath of a Wok" and wanted to continue on that path. Does anyone else have this book? Have you cooked anything from it?

      Here was dinner tonight:

      Spicy Dry-Fried Beef (p. 70)

      I undercooked the beef just a bit due to a waning propane supply (I use an outdoor propane-powered wok burner), but there's nothing to complain about here. It's a relatively mild dish that lets the flavors of the ingredients (and the wok) speak. Overall I liked it, at will probably make it again (hopefully with a full tank of gas).


    • By CanadianSportsman
      Greetings,

      I've cooked several recipes from Keller's "Bouchon" the last couple of weeks, and have loved them all! At the moment (as in right this minute) I'm making the boeuf Bourguignon, and am a little confused about the red wine reduction. After reducing the wine, herbs, and veg for nearly an hour now, I'm nowhere near the consistancy of a glaze that Keller specifies. In fact, it looks mostly like the veg is on the receiving end of most of it. Is this how the recipe is meant to be? Can anybody tell me what kind of yield is expected? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you, kindly. 
    • By Paul Fink
      This unfortunately titled book changed my life. I always enjoyed cooking and idealized Julia Child &
      Jacque Pepin. But I was a typical home cook. I would see a recipe and try to duplicate it little understanding about what I was doing.
       
      Cooking the Nouvelle Cuisine in America talked about a philosophy of cooking. It showed me that there is more depth to cooking. A history. A philosophy.
      The recipes are very approachable and you can make them on a budget from grocery store ingredients. I read it as a grad student in Oregon, in the late 80's I had access to lots of fresh ingredients. And some very nice wines, cheap! I was suppose to be studying physics but I end up learning more about wine & cooking.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×