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KaffirLime

Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment (Part 4)

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[Moderator note: The original Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment topic became too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it up; the preceding part of this discussion is here: Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment (Part 3)]

Somebody directed me to this thread so I was pleased to see the first post asking the question 'Is Sous Vide practical and 'do' able at home?' which is exactly what I want to know. I've ploughed through the first quarter of the 59 pages that follow but most posts seems to be immersed in cooking techniques and times without addressing the first question.

Can it be done at home?

So back to the original question - Can it and with what equipment?

I've got vacuum sealing equipment. What I haven't got (and have no intention of buying at £1000) is a water bath. So what is the best way of keeping a constant low temperature without a water bath. Somebody once told me you can adapt a rice cooker but I've never owned one so I don't know if that would work. I've got a brand new Magimix deep fat fryer which has never had oil in it - the temperature on that can be set as low as 50c - Could that be used?

All ideas gratefully received!


Edited by Mjx Moderator note added. (log)

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I use the Auber controller and have had a great experience. There is a similar (is it the same unit) sold as 'Sous Vide Magic'.

For heat sources, there are cheaper things than the 25-cup ric e cookers (which run over $100 around here anyway). If you are cooking smallish items like chicken breasts and steaks and eggs then you can get away with something Crockpot-size (when cooking small items i use a 6 qt Presto multicooker -- which can be had for less than $30 on Amazon)).

For cooking large cuts, I use a tabletop roaster (mine is Hamilton Beach brand but there is also Nesco which seems identical). The cost was $10 at a local thrift shop but they can be bought new for less than $50 new from places like Amazon or Fry's electronics. When using the roaster, I also have to use a $5 aquarium air pump to make sure that the water circulates. The table top roaster is large enough for a rack of ribs and a 10 lb brisket.

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Somebody directed me to this thread so I was pleased to see the first post asking the question 'Is Sous Vide practical and 'do' able at home?'  which is exactly what I want to know. I've ploughed through the first quarter of the 59 pages that follow but most posts seems to be immersed in cooking techniques and times without addressing the first question.

Can it be done at home?

So back to the original question - Can it and with what equipment?

I've got vacuum sealing equipment. What I haven't got (and have no intention of buying at £1000) is a water bath. So what is the best way of keeping a constant low temperature without a water bath. Somebody once told me you can adapt a rice cooker but  I've never owned one so I don't know if that would work. I've got a brand new Magimix deep fat fryer which has never had oil in it - the temperature on that can be set as low as 50c - Could that be used?

All ideas gratefully received!

I was asking the same question like you a few months ago, and followed the posts here and find sous vide a fascinating way to prepare delicious and healthy dishes, because it can preserve natural nutrients, which otherwise would be destroyed by high heat or loose the natural flavor in water.

I find that sous-vide is quite a practical way to cook at home, because you can now vacuum pack food ingredients with Foodsaver and use a rice cooker (mine is a 20 cups Tiger JCC-2700) as a water bath provided its temperature is controlled by a temperature controller(I use SousVideMagic which is very economical compared to the other water baths). The people there are very supportive and knowledgeable about sous-vide cooking. I even got a Pork Belly recipe from SousVideMagic people which I posted yesterday upon request from another eGullet member, Rich.

My family loves sous-vide cooking, dinner is always ready when we get home and even if we are late at times the food is never over-cooked!!

.

Hope my personal experience is helpful to you.


Edited by edaname (log)

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I ordered the new model from Auberins. They shipped it today. I will be gone this weekend and half of next but I will post a review when I get a chance. I will try the egg first.

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Wow, I try to keep up with this thread a bit, but I had no idea that setting up a water bath was so easy to do and relatively affordable at home. I'm just a poor line cook so the investment is still pretty significant, but it is definitely do-able.

I have some pro experience with sous vide but the place I worked at didn't do a very good job with it IMO. I'm anxious to experiment at home.

Is there any info out there (like a spreadsheet, table, etc) that shows recommended times and temps for this stuff?

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...

Is there any info out there (like a spreadsheet, table, etc) that shows recommended times and temps for this stuff? 

nathanm posted some handy charts (discussion starts here). Unfortunately the formatting has gotten messed up due to changes in the board software. You can copy the HTML into a text file and view it in your browser. Some of the info has been transcribed by other folks (see here).

Presumably all this info will be in Nathan's book. :smile:

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You may also find my short guide to sous vide useful. It is still a work in progress, but it can be found here. I keep working on it whenever I have a chance. For instance, last week I included photographs illustrating eggs cooked for 75 minutes at 136F, 138F, ..., 152F. Today, I posted an updated and expanded section on food safety. It is my hope that my little guide can act as a stopgap until Nathan's book is released.

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I was wondering if anyone knows if the new Thomas Keller book on Amazon "Under Pressure" is his long awaited volume on Sous Vide. The title sounds weird for Sous Vide and the price is somewhat high.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/157965351...d=2L04EQJX0EJWI

The title is the same as a New York Times article about Keller and sous-vide, so my guess would be that this is his sous-vide book. It's not available yet, so maybe when it's offered for sale amazon.com will have excerpts.

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Thanks for the links.

Has anyone experimented with doing sabayon type sauces sous vide? I've heard of people using the water baths to get the eggs right to the proper temp needed without double boilers, whipping, etc. Anyone tried it?

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I am interested in buying an immersion circulator, basically I am wanting to cook meats (turkey breasts, roast beef) for sandwichs. This would be commercially and I am wondering on food safety issues of cooking a 5+ lb roast. I know its been covered in 60 pages but I cant search that long. Also is it best to buy a circulator and put it in a hotel pan?? My budget allows 1200 or so for this toy, but I want to make sure its what I want and it will create juicy tender meat for the best sandwiches around??

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I have had a lot of success with beef cooked sous-vide but I think that a 5lb roast is a bit too large to do in one package. Why not divide it into two bags? If you use a stock pot with your circulator two or even three packages will cook perfectly. I find 52°C for about four hours for a three inch thick piece of beef produces perfect rare meat for sandwiches or salad. It can also be seared and served as a steak

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That wouldnt be an issue to cut into smaller roasts, I think that would be even better having each days roast beef cryovacted seperate, cook a couple roasts at a time open as needed.... Is it easiest to use a circulator in a stock pot??

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I am interested in buying an immersion circulator, basically I am wanting to cook meats (turkey breasts, roast beef) for sandwichs.  This would be commercially and I am wondering on food safety issues of cooking a 5+ lb roast.  I know its been covered in 60 pages but I cant search that long.  Also is it best to buy a circulator and put it in a hotel pan??  My budget allows 1200 or so for this toy, but I want to make sure its what I want and it will create juicy tender meat for the best sandwiches around??

If you are cooking the meat to sell, then the meat should be pasteurized, quickly cooled and stored below 38F (3C) or below 41F (5C) for less than 10 days (to prevent the growth of C. botulinum, C. perfringens, and B. cereus). There are two standards for pasteurization (i) Salmonella spp. and (ii) Listeria monocytogenes -- which one you need to use depends on which country you live in.

As stated many times up thread, the cooking time depends on thickness and not weight.

For poultry cooked in a 141F (60.5C) water bath to a center temperature of 140F (60C), I calculate the following times:

Salmonella (7D reduction):

5mm......00:26:12

10mm....00:30:22

15mm....00:37:25

20mm....00:47:11

25mm....00:59:32

30mm....01:13:57

35mm....01:30:29

40mm....01:55:26

45mm....02:25:48

50mm....02:59:40

55mm....03:37:12

60mm....04:18:35

65mm....05:02:50

70mm....05:51:02

L. monocytogenes (6D reduction):

5mm......00:28:26

10mm....00:32:32

15mm....00:39:28

20mm....00:49:05

25mm....01:01:17

30mm....01:15:34

35mm....01:31:58

40mm....01:55:26

45mm....02:25:48

50mm....02:59:40

55mm....03:37:12

60mm....04:18:35

65mm....05:02:50

70mm....05:51:02

Cooling Time in Ice Water to 41F (5C):

5mm......00:01:14

10mm....00:04:20

15mm....00:09:23

20mm....00:16:23

25mm....00:25:20

30mm....00:36:12

35mm....00:49:03

40mm....01:03:50

45mm....01:20:35

50mm....01:39:15

55mm....01:59:54

60mm....02:22:28

65mm....02:47:01

70mm....03:13:28

Being cooked at a lower temperature, the pasteurization times are much longer

for beef cooked in a 131F (55C) water bath to a center temperature of 130F (54.5C):

Salmonella (6.5D reduction):

5mm......01:31:10

10mm....01:34:57

15mm....01:42:09

20mm....01:52:24

25mm....02:04:47

30mm....02:20:06

35mm....02:38:34

40mm....02:59:06

45mm....03:22:13

50mm....03:47:59

55mm....04:15:46

60mm....04:45:29

65mm....05:17:15

70mm....05:50:44

L. monocytogenes (6D reduction):

5mm......02:24:50

10mm....04:49:54

15mm....05:54:17

20mm....06:05:21

25mm....06:16:42

30mm....06:31:47

35mm....06:50:30

40mm....07:10:23

45mm....07:33:32

50mm....08:00:15

55mm....08:29:10

60mm....09:00:26

65mm....09:34:27

70mm....10:10:41

Cooling Time in Ice Water to 41F (5C):

5mm......00:01:12

10mm....00:04:12

15mm....00:09:05

20mm....00:15:51

25mm....00:24:29

30mm....00:34:59

35mm....00:47:23

40mm....01:01:40

45mm....01:17:49

50mm....01:35:52

55mm....01:55:47

60mm....02:17:34

65mm....02:41:16

70mm....03:06:48

I use my immersion circulator in a counter-top food warmer/steam table so that the water bath is insulated (as per Pounce's suggestion up thread). Moreover, it is important to use a lid to limit evaporation; either make a Lexan lid or you can use steam table pan lids (say a 2/3 in the front and cut up a 1/3 for the back).

[You can find a discussion on how I computed the above times on my sous vide page.]

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I have REALLY enjoyed reading the first 30 pages of posts...you guys are amazing! I have been cooking sous-vide for a year now...all wildly experimental. While I generally don't consider myself to be a complete idiot; I have been totally unable to make "hide nor hair" out of Nathan's tables...they simply aren't readable in my browser. I've tried both IE and Safari browsers. What am I doing wrong?

Is if possible for someone to PM me a copy? I'd sure appreciate it!

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Not exactly the same as sabayon, but I have made Swiss meringue using a bowl in the waterbath set to 70C. Unsurprisingly it works OK. The downside is the additional height of the waterbath makes beating the egg white less convenient.

Also a bowl in a bain marie is a good fit. A bowl in an open waterbath isn’t, so it takes more firmness to hold the bowl and there’s a good chance of the water being ejected over the edge once the whites start to stiffen.

So on practical grounds I’m sticking to a saucepan of hot water.

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The following table was originally posted by nathanm on 08/05/2005, here.



Here is the table for 54.4C / 130F final core temperature, starting at 5C/41F initial temperature

Bath C Bath F mm inch Cook time Rest time Core C Core F Early -1C Late +1C
55 131.0 5 0.20 00
: 01 : 41
00
: 00 : 02
54.4 129.9 00
: 00 : 23
56 132.8 5 0.20 00
: 01 : 19
00
: 00 : 03
54.3 129.7 00
: 00 : 11
00
: 00 : 20
60 140.0 5 0.20 00
: 00 : 53
00
: 00 : 03
53.8 128.9 00
: 00 : 03
00
: 00 : 04
65 149.0 5 0.20 00
: 00 : 41
00
: 00 : 03
53.1 127.7 00
: 00 : 02
00
: 00 : 01
55 131.0 10 0.39 00
: 06 : 39
00
: 00 : 09
54.4 129.9 00
: 01 : 25
56 132.8 10 0.39 00
: 05 : 16
00
: 00 : 10
54.3 129.7 00
: 00 : 41
00
: 01 : 24
60 140.0 10 0.39 00
: 03 : 32
00
: 00 : 13
53.9 129.0 00
: 00 : 15
00
: 00 : 16
65 149.0 10 0.39 00
: 02 : 43
00
: 00 : 14
53.1 127.7 00
: 00 : 08
00
: 00 : 08
55 131.0 15 0.59 00
: 14 : 58
00
: 00 : 21
54.4 129.9 00
: 03 : 11
56 132.8 15 0.59 00
: 11 : 50
00
: 00 : 23
54.3 129.7 00
: 01 : 33
00
: 03 : 10
60 140.0 15 0.59 00
: 07 : 58
00
: 00 : 28
53.9 129.0 00
: 00 : 33
00
: 00 : 38
65 149.0 15 0.59 00
: 06 : 06
00
: 00 : 31
53.1 127.7 00
: 00 : 18
00
: 00 : 19
55 131.0 20 0.79 00
: 26 : 57
00
: 00 : 38
54.4 129.9 00
: 06 : 00
56 132.8 20 0.79 00
: 21 : 02
00
: 00 : 38
54.3 129.7 00
: 02 : 45
00
: 06 : 00
60 140.0 20 0.79 00
: 14 : 10
00
: 00 : 50
53.9 129.0 00
: 00 : 58
00
: 01 : 09
65 149.0 20 0.79 00
: 10 : 51
00
: 00 : 57
53.1 127.7 00
: 00 : 32
00
: 00 : 34
55 131.0 25 0.98 00
: 41 : 29
00
: 00 : 56
54.4 129.9 00
: 08 : 48
56 132.8 25 0.98 00
: 32 : 52
00
: 01 : 02
54.3 129.7 00
: 04 : 17
00
: 08 : 46
60 140.0 25 0.98 00
: 22 : 08
00
: 01 : 18
53.9 129.0 00
: 01 : 31
00
: 01 : 48
65 149.0 25 0.98 00
: 16 : 57
00
: 01 : 27
53.1 127.7 00
: 00 : 50
00
: 00 : 54
55 131.0 30 1.18 01
: 00 : 51
01
: 00 : 50
54.4 130.0 00
: 12 : 48
56 132.8 30 1.18 00
: 48 : 17
00
: 48 : 16
54.4 130.0 00
: 07 : 13
00
: 12 : 38
60 140.0 30 1.18 00
: 31 : 40
00
: 01 : 50
53.8 128.9 00
: 02 : 00
00
: 02 : 45
65 149.0 30 1.18 00
: 24 : 25
00
: 02 : 09
53.1 127.7 00
: 01 : 11
00
: 01 : 17
55 131.0 35 1.38 01
: 19 : 33
00
: 01 : 54
54.4 129.9 00
: 15 : 15
56 132.8 35 1.38 01
: 04 : 20
00
: 02 : 03
54.4 129.9 00
: 07 : 34
00
: 15 : 30
60 140.0 35 1.38 00
: 42 : 57
00
: 02 : 32
53.8 128.8 00
: 02 : 54
00
: 05 : 15
65 149.0 35 1.38 00
: 33 : 11
00
: 02 : 51
53.1 127.7 00
: 01 : 36
00
: 01 : 45
55 131.0 40 1.57 01
: 41 : 38
00
: 02 : 26
54.4 129.9 00
: 20 : 31
56 132.8 40 1.57 01
: 21 : 30
00
: 02 : 46
54.3 129.7 00
: 10 : 06
00
: 20 : 17
60 140.0 40 1.57 00
: 57 : 59
00
: 57 : 58
54.4 130.0 00
: 03 : 36
00
: 04 : 16
65 149.0 40 1.57 00
: 45 : 46
00
: 45 : 45
54.4 130.0 00
: 04 : 41
00
: 02 : 11
55 131.0 45 1.77 02
: 05 : 05
00
: 03 : 14
54.4 129.9 00
: 24 : 54
56 132.8 45 1.77 01
: 40 : 39
00
: 03 : 34
54.3 129.7 00
: 12 : 14
00
: 26 : 28
60 140.0 45 1.77 01
: 09 : 12
00
: 04 : 13
53.8 128.8 00
: 04 : 28
00
: 05 : 18
65 149.0 45 1.77 00
: 57 : 18
00
: 57 : 17
54.4 130.0 00
: 02 : 28
00
: 02 : 40
55 131.0 50 1.97 02
: 31 : 22
00
: 04 : 03
54.4 129.9 00
: 31 : 20
56 132.8 50 1.97 02
: 00 : 35
00
: 04 : 23
54.3 129.7 00
: 14 : 26
00
: 31 : 18
60 140.0 50 1.97 01
: 23 : 29
00
: 05 : 22
53.8 128.8 00
: 05 : 41
00
: 06 : 15
65 149.0 50 1.97 01
: 05 : 16
00
: 06 : 11
53.0 127.3 00
: 00 : 58
00
: 03 : 14
55 131.0 55 2.17 02
: 56 : 40
00
: 05 : 05
54.4 129.9 00
: 36 : 18
56 132.8 55 2.17 02
: 21 : 01
00
: 05 : 25
54.3 129.7 00
: 18 : 05
00
: 36 : 17
60 140.0 55 2.17 01
: 37 : 39
00
: 06 : 35
53.7 128.6 00
: 06 : 02
00
: 07 : 09
65 149.0 55 2.17 01
: 16 : 48
00
: 07 : 35
52.8 127.1 00
: 03 : 24
00
: 03 : 42
55 131.0 60 2.36 03
: 22 : 16
00
: 06 : 17
54.4 129.9 00
: 41 : 21
56 132.8 60 2.36 02
: 41 : 38
00
: 06 : 47
54.3 129.7 00
: 20 : 33
00
: 41 : 21
60 140.0 60 2.36 01
: 52 : 26
00
: 08 : 07
53.7 128.6 00
: 06 : 50
00
: 08 : 06
65 149.0 60 2.36 01
: 28 : 24
00
: 09 : 27
52.7 126.8 00
: 03 : 49
00
: 04 : 37
55 131.0 65 2.56 03
: 48 : 32
00
: 07 : 39
54.4 129.9 00
: 47 : 04
56 132.8 65 2.56 03
: 02 : 15
00
: 08 : 09
54.3 129.7 00
: 23 : 02
00
: 46 : 26
60 140.0 65 2.56 02
: 06 : 32
00
: 09 : 49
53.6 128.4 00
: 07 : 34
00
: 09 : 42
65 149.0 65 2.56 01
: 40 : 10
00
: 11 : 18
52.6 126.7 00
: 04 : 28
00
: 04 : 53
55 131.0 70 2.76 04
: 14 : 54
00
: 09 : 11
54.4 130.0 00
: 53 : 04
56 132.8 70 2.76 03
: 22 : 44
00
: 09 : 41
54.3 129.7 00
: 25 : 31
00
: 53 : 03
60 140.0 70 2.76 02
: 21 : 04
00
: 11 : 41
53.6 128.5 00
: 09 : 00
00
: 10 : 43
65 149.0 70 2.76 01
: 51 : 14
00
: 13 : 40
52.4 126.4 00
: 04 : 37
00
: 05 : 35
55 131.0 75 2.95 04
: 41 : 42
04
: 41 : 41
54.4 130.0 00
: 59 : 53
56 132.8 75 2.95 03
: 42 : 51
00
: 11 : 33
54.3 129.7 00
: 27 : 57
00
: 59 : 28
60 140.0 75 2.95 02
: 34 : 35
00
: 13 : 53
53.5 128.3 00
: 09 : 03
00
: 11 : 37
65 149.0 75 2.95 02
: 02 : 14
00
: 16 : 18
52.3 126.1 00
: 05 : 00
00
: 06 : 04
55 131.0 80 3.15 05
: 06 : 33
05
: 06 : 32
54.4 130.0 01
: 05 : 06
56 132.8 80 3.15 04
: 02 : 31
00
: 13 : 35
54.3 129.7 00
: 30 : 22
01
: 05 : 02
60 140.0 80 3.15 02
: 48 : 27
00
: 16 : 25
53.5 128.3 00
: 10 : 34
00
: 11 : 41
65 149.0 80 3.15 02
: 12 : 51
00
: 19 : 18
52.2 125.9 00
: 05 : 56
00
: 06 : 31
55 131.0 90 3.54 05
: 53 : 50
05
: 53 : 49
54.4 130.0 01
: 11 : 56
56 132.8 90 3.54 04
: 43 : 10
00
: 18 : 29
54.4 129.9 00
: 38 : 03
01
: 11 : 54
60 140.0 90 3.54 03
: 13 : 59
00
: 22 : 08
53.4 128.2 00
: 12 : 05
00
: 14 : 19
65 149.0 90 3.54 02
: 32 : 05
00
: 26 : 09
51.8 125.3 00
: 06 : 39
00
: 07 : 18
55 131.0 100 3.94 06
: 37 : 46
06
: 37 : 45
54.4 130.0 01
: 19 : 06
56 132.8 100 3.94 05
: 20 : 05
00
: 24 : 13
54.4 129.9 00
: 41 : 31
01
: 19 : 03
60 140.0 100 3.94 03
: 36 : 12
00
: 28 : 50
53.2 127.8 00
: 13 : 19
00
: 17 : 02
65 149.0 100 3.94 02
: 50 : 01
00
: 33 : 10
51.6 124.8 00
: 08 : 03
00
: 08 : 03
55 131.0 150 5.91 09
: 23 : 30
09
: 23 : 29
54.4 130.0 01
: 49 : 35
56 132.8 150 5.91 07
: 35 : 58
07
: 35 : 57
54.4 130.0 01
: 01 : 10
01
: 48 : 09
60 140.0 150 5.91 05
: 02 : 25
00
: 52 : 34
53.0 127.4 00
: 19 : 42
00
: 25 : 11
65 149.0 150 5.91 03
: 53 : 28
00
: 58 : 03
50.5 122.9 00
: 10 : 43
00
: 12 : 58

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The following table was posted by nathanm here.

Here is the fish cooking table - starting at 5C/41F and ending with a core temperature of 45C/113F.

As noted above this temperature is not sufficient to sterilize the food so you must be very hygenic, start with top quality fish, do NOT do cook and hold, and cut the thickness down to the point where the cooking time is reasonable.

Bath C Bath F mm inch Cook time Rest time Core C Core F Early -1C Late +1C
46 114.8 5 0.20 00 : 01 : 23 00 : 00 : 03 44.9 112.8 00 : 00 : 15
47 116.6 5 0.20 00 : 01 : 08 00 : 00 : 03 44.8 112.6 00 : 00 : 09 00 : 00 : 15
50 122.0 5 0.20 00 : 00 : 50 00 : 00 : 03 44.5 112.0 00 : 00 : 04 00 : 00 : 04
46 114.8 10 0.39 00 : 05 : 31 00 : 00 : 10 44.9 112.8 00 : 00 : 58
47 116.6 10 0.39 00 : 04 : 36 00 : 00 : 11 44.8 112.7 00 : 00 : 36 00 : 00 : 57
50 122.0 10 0.39 00 : 03 : 21 00 : 00 : 13 44.5 112.0 00 : 00 : 17 00 : 00 : 19
46 114.8 15 0.59 00 : 12 : 25 00 : 00 : 24 44.9 112.8 00 : 02 : 09
47 116.6 15 0.59 00 : 10 : 20 00 : 00 : 26 44.8 112.7 00 : 01 : 22 00 : 02 : 08
50 122.0 15 0.59 00 : 07 : 32 00 : 00 : 29 44.5 112.0 00 : 00 : 38 00 : 00 : 45
46 114.8 20 0.79 00 : 22 : 04 00 : 00 : 43 44.9 112.8 00 : 03 : 50
47 116.6 20 0.79 00 : 18 : 22 00 : 00 : 43 44.8 112.7 00 : 02 : 26 00 : 03 : 49
50 122.0 20 0.79 00 : 13 : 23 00 : 00 : 51 44.5 112.0 00 : 01 : 07 00 : 01 : 21
46 114.8 25 0.98 00 : 34 : 27 00 : 01 : 04 44.9 112.8 00 : 05 : 58
47 116.6 25 0.98 00 : 28 : 42 00 : 01 : 10 44.8 112.7 00 : 03 : 47 00 : 05 : 57
50 122.0 25 0.98 00 : 20 : 54 00 : 01 : 23 44.5 112.0 00 : 01 : 44 00 : 02 : 00
46 114.8 30 1.18 00 : 50 : 37 00 : 50 : 36 45.0 113.0 00 : 09 : 42
47 116.6 30 1.18 00 : 41 : 13 00 : 01 : 37 44.8 112.7 00 : 05 : 24 00 : 09 : 41
50 122.0 30 1.18 00 : 30 : 05 00 : 02 : 04 44.5 112.0 00 : 02 : 30 00 : 03 : 02
46 114.8 35 1.38 01 : 06 : 30 00 : 02 : 07 44.9 112.8 00 : 09 : 55
47 116.6 35 1.38 00 : 56 : 59 00 : 56 : 58 45.0 113.0 00 : 06 : 51 00 : 09 : 41
50 122.0 35 1.38 00 : 40 : 50 00 : 02 : 45 44.5 112.0 00 : 03 : 22 00 : 05 : 34
46 114.8 40 1.57 01 : 25 : 15 00 : 02 : 48 44.9 112.8 00 : 14 : 05
47 116.6 40 1.57 01 : 11 : 40 00 : 02 : 58 44.8 112.7 00 : 07 : 22 00 : 14 : 03
50 122.0 40 1.57 00 : 55 : 09 00 : 55 : 08 45.0 113.0 00 : 03 : 59 00 : 04 : 50
46 114.8 45 1.77 01 : 45 : 11 00 : 03 : 36 44.9 112.8 00 : 17 : 03
47 116.6 45 1.77 01 : 28 : 44 00 : 03 : 56 44.8 112.7 00 : 11 : 01 00 : 17 : 02
50 122.0 45 1.77 01 : 05 : 35 00 : 04 : 35 44.4 111.9 00 : 01 : 42 00 : 05 : 53
46 114.8 50 1.97 02 : 05 : 58 00 : 04 : 34 44.9 112.8 00 : 20 : 08
47 116.6 50 1.97 01 : 46 : 32 00 : 05 : 04 44.8 112.7 00 : 12 : 59 00 : 20 : 06
50 122.0 50 1.97 01 : 19 : 14 00 : 05 : 54 44.4 111.9 00 : 05 : 44 00 : 06 : 57
46 114.8 55 2.17 02 : 27 : 13 00 : 05 : 46 44.9 112.8 00 : 23 : 17
47 116.6 55 2.17 02 : 04 : 45 00 : 06 : 16 44.8 112.7 00 : 14 : 59 00 : 24 : 16
50 122.0 55 2.17 01 : 32 : 47 00 : 07 : 16 44.3 111.7 00 : 06 : 34 00 : 08 : 29
46 114.8 60 2.36 02 : 48 : 44 00 : 07 : 09 44.9 112.8 00 : 26 : 30
47 116.6 60 2.36 02 : 23 : 10 00 : 07 : 39 44.8 112.7 00 : 18 : 21 00 : 28 : 27
50 122.0 60 2.36 01 : 46 : 55 00 : 08 : 58 44.3 111.7 00 : 07 : 55 00 : 09 : 36
46 114.8 65 2.56 03 : 12 : 27 00 : 08 : 41 44.9 112.9 00 : 31 : 56
47 116.6 65 2.56 02 : 41 : 33 00 : 09 : 21 44.8 112.7 00 : 20 : 32 00 : 31 : 54
50 122.0 65 2.56 02 : 01 : 02 00 : 11 : 00 44.3 111.7 00 : 08 : 50 00 : 10 : 44

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The following table was posted by nathanm here.



Here is the table for a wide variety of foods started at 5C/41F and cooked to an internal temperature of 60C/140F. I cook chicken this way, also fois gras and pork.


Bath C Bath F mm inch Cook time Rest time Core C Core F Early -1C Late +1C
61 141.8 5 0.20 00 : 01 : 30 00 : 00 : 03 59.9 139.9 00 : 00 : 15
62 143.6 5 0.20 00 : 01 : 16 00 : 00 : 03 59.9 139.8 00 : 00 : 10 00 : 00 : 14
65 149.0 5 0.20 00 : 00 : 57 00 : 00 : 03 59.5 139.2 00 : 00 : 04 00 : 00 : 04
61 141.8 10 0.39 00 : 06 : 00 00 : 00 : 10 59.9 139.9 00 : 01 : 01
62 143.6 10 0.39 00 : 05 : 01 00 : 00 : 10 59.8 139.7 00 : 00 : 34 00 : 00 : 56
65 149.0 10 0.39 00 : 03 : 46 00 : 00 : 11 59.5 139.2 00 : 00 : 16 00 : 00 : 17
61 141.8 15 0.59 00 : 13 : 23 00 : 00 : 20 59.9 139.8 00 : 02 : 09
62 143.6 15 0.59 00 : 11 : 17 00 : 00 : 23 59.8 139.7 00 : 01 : 16 00 : 02 : 08
65 149.0 15 0.59 00 : 08 : 29 00 : 00 : 26 59.5 139.2 00 : 00 : 36 00 : 00 : 43
61 141.8 20 0.79 00 : 23 : 47 00 : 00 : 37 59.9 139.8 00 : 03 : 49
62 143.6 20 0.79 00 : 20 : 03 00 : 00 : 42 59.8 139.7 00 : 02 : 15 00 : 03 : 48
65 149.0 20 0.79 00 : 15 : 06 00 : 00 : 45 59.5 139.2 00 : 01 : 04 00 : 01 : 12
61 141.8 25 0.98 00 : 37 : 07 00 : 00 : 55 59.9 139.8 00 : 05 : 57
62 143.6 25 0.98 00 : 31 : 19 00 : 01 : 01 59.8 139.7 00 : 03 : 30 00 : 05 : 56
65 149.0 25 0.98 00 : 23 : 35 00 : 01 : 12 59.5 139.2 00 : 01 : 41 00 : 01 : 53
61 141.8 30 1.18 00 : 54 : 29 00 : 54 : 28 60.0 140.0 00 : 08 : 41
62 143.6 30 1.18 00 : 46 : 02 00 : 46 : 01 60.0 140.0 00 : 06 : 03 00 : 08 : 40
65 149.0 30 1.18 00 : 33 : 56 00 : 01 : 47 59.5 139.2 00 : 02 : 34 00 : 02 : 42
61 141.8 35 1.38 01 : 11 : 27 00 : 01 : 52 59.9 139.8 00 : 09 : 40
62 143.6 35 1.38 01 : 02 : 04 01 : 02 : 03 60.0 140.0 00 : 06 : 47 00 : 09 : 38
65 149.0 35 1.38 00 : 47 : 30 00 : 47 : 29 60.0 140.0 00 : 04 : 58 00 : 03 : 47
61 141.8 40 1.57 01 : 31 : 28 00 : 02 : 34 59.9 139.8 00 : 13 : 56
62 143.6 40 1.57 01 : 17 : 53 00 : 02 : 44 59.8 139.7 00 : 08 : 17 00 : 15 : 04
65 149.0 40 1.57 01 : 01 : 22 01 : 01 : 21 60.0 140.0 00 : 03 : 56 00 : 02 : 55
61 141.8 45 1.77 01 : 52 : 44 00 : 03 : 13 59.9 139.8 00 : 16 : 54
62 143.6 45 1.77 01 : 36 : 16 00 : 03 : 23 59.8 139.7 00 : 10 : 31 00 : 16 : 52
65 149.0 45 1.77 01 : 13 : 29 00 : 04 : 03 59.4 139.0 00 : 04 : 55 00 : 05 : 56
61 141.8 50 1.97 02 : 14 : 52 00 : 04 : 02 59.9 139.8 00 : 19 : 58
62 143.6 50 1.97 01 : 55 : 24 00 : 04 : 22 59.8 139.7 00 : 12 : 59 00 : 19 : 57
65 149.0 50 1.97 01 : 28 : 32 00 : 05 : 01 59.4 139.0 00 : 05 : 48 00 : 07 : 00
61 141.8 55 2.17 02 : 37 : 32 00 : 05 : 05 59.9 139.8 00 : 23 : 07
62 143.6 55 2.17 02 : 15 : 01 00 : 05 : 25 59.8 139.7 00 : 15 : 01 00 : 23 : 06
65 149.0 55 2.17 01 : 43 : 25 00 : 06 : 14 59.3 138.8 00 : 06 : 38 00 : 08 : 38
61 141.8 60 2.36 03 : 02 : 38 00 : 06 : 07 59.9 139.9 00 : 28 : 29
62 143.6 60 2.36 02 : 34 : 50 00 : 06 : 37 59.8 139.7 00 : 17 : 04 00 : 26 : 18
65 149.0 60 2.36 01 : 58 : 58 00 : 07 : 36 59.3 138.8 00 : 07 : 31 00 : 09 : 06
61 141.8 65 2.56 03 : 25 : 50 00 : 07 : 28 59.9 139.9 00 : 31 : 57
62 143.6 65 2.56 02 : 54 : 37 00 : 07 : 59 59.8 139.7 00 : 19 : 07 00 : 31 : 57
65 149.0 65 2.56 02 : 14 : 29 00 : 09 : 08 59.3 138.8 00 : 09 : 01 00 : 10 : 10
61 141.8 70 2.76 03 : 48 : 51 00 : 09 : 00 59.9 139.9 00 : 35 : 26
62 143.6 70 2.76 03 : 14 : 16 00 : 09 : 31 59.8 139.7 00 : 21 : 10 00 : 35 : 24
65 149.0 70 2.76 02 : 29 : 05 00 : 10 : 50 59.3 138.7 00 : 09 : 12 00 : 11 : 10
61 141.8 75 2.95 04 : 11 : 29 00 : 10 : 32 59.9 139.9 00 : 38 : 52
62 143.6 75 2.95 03 : 33 : 33 00 : 11 : 12 59.8 139.7 00 : 23 : 11 00 : 38 : 51
65 149.0 75 2.95 02 : 43 : 16 00 : 12 : 48 59.2 138.5 00 : 09 : 59 00 : 13 : 03
61 141.8 80 3.15 04 : 33 : 52 00 : 12 : 24 59.9 139.9 00 : 42 : 28
62 143.6 80 3.15 03 : 52 : 25 00 : 13 : 14 59.8 139.7 00 : 25 : 10 00 : 42 : 13
65 149.0 80 3.15 02 : 57 : 51 00 : 15 : 08 59.2 138.5 00 : 11 : 38 00 : 14 : 09
61 141.8 85 3.35 04 : 56 : 48 00 : 14 : 36 60.0 140.0 00 : 47 : 10
62 143.6 85 3.35 04 : 10 : 44 00 : 15 : 18 59.8 139.7 00 : 27 : 06 00 : 47 : 10
65 149.0 85 3.35 03 : 12 : 03 00 : 17 : 28 59.2 138.5 00 : 12 : 32 00 : 15 : 10
61 141.8 90 3.54 05 : 18 : 37 00 : 16 : 49 60.0 140.0 00 : 51 : 20
62 143.6 90 3.54 04 : 28 : 27 00 : 17 : 49 59.8 139.7 00 : 28 : 58 00 : 51 : 20
65 149.0 90 3.54 03 : 25 : 42 00 : 20 : 19 59.2 138.5 00 : 13 : 21 00 : 16 : 15
61 141.8 95 3.74 05 : 39 : 49 05 : 39 : 48 60.0 140.0 00 : 55 : 33
62 143.6 95 3.74 04 : 45 : 29 00 : 20 : 29 59.8 139.7 00 : 30 : 46 00 : 55 : 33
65 149.0 95 3.74 03 : 37 : 46 00 : 23 : 09 59.1 138.4 00 : 14 : 05 00 : 17 : 08
61 141.8 100 3.94 05 : 59 : 15 05 : 59 : 14 60.0 140.0 00 : 58 : 41
62 143.6 100 3.94 05 : 01 : 51 00 : 23 : 20 59.8 139.7 00 : 32 : 31 00 : 57 : 32
65 149.0 100 3.94 03 : 49 : 11 00 : 26 : 20 59.0 138.2 00 : 14 : 45 00 : 19 : 13

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Mr. False Economy here, so after using those super cheaps bags I found... (y'know what's coming next) I arrive home to find 10litres of exquisite duck fat soup that was supposed to be confit that has been cooked at 82c for 10hrs.

Anyway the plastic orbs I use in the bath for heat retention have a glorious duck fat sheen and can't shift it with washing up liquid. Any recommendations for a man, who one day will, look gift horses in the mouth?


Edited by adey73 (log)

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I know most/all SV discussion here is for immediate service but what needs to be done for cook and hold? i am not talking for days but a few hours maybe. What needs to be done after the bag is removed? I assume it needs to be chilled then heated again for service but any specifics would be appreciated. I am just curious.

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Well, it of course depends on what you are cooking. If you are cooking at below 131F (55C), then you shouldn't hold it at all. If you are cooking at or above 131F (55C) and only want to hold it for a couple hours, then I would recommend holding it in the water bath.

If you want to hold it longer than a couple hours, then you should rapidly cool it in a ice water bath (see my tables above) and then refrigerate it at

a) below 36.5F (2.5C) for up to 90 days,

b) below 38F (3.3C) for less than 31 days,

c) below 41F (5C) for less than 10 days, or

d) below 50F (10C) for less than 5 days.

This will prevent the outgrowth of non-proteolytic C. botulinum.

If you are doing a confit (or similar recipe) with the center temperature at 176F (80C) for longer than 6 hours (or 185F {85C} for longer than 36 minutes), then it just needs to be stored at below 50F (10C). Unless there is sufficient air left in the package to allow B. cereus to grow (i.e., you used a clamp style vacuum sealer rather than a chamber style vacuum sealer), in which case it must be stored at below 39F (4C).

Edit: Fixed formating.

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Douglas,

Thank you so much. That is exactly the straight-to-the-point fact packed answer I was looking for. I am going to save that to my little cheatsheet.

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I think it’s fabulous sharing this information. Could you give the source. Obviously, this type of information on storage times/temperatures cannot be easily verified and is pretty safety-critical. I’d like to use the data, but clearly it would be difficult to justify without a reference. Thanks.

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