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Want to Buy Real Wild Rice


Shel_B
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After using cultivated "wild rice" for so many years, not knowing there was a difference, I'd like to try some real wild rice that's been harvested and processed the traditional way. Can anyone recommend a good mail order source for this product. There are many on the 'net, but I'd feel more comfortable with a couple-three solid recommendations. Thanks!

 ... Shel


 

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  • 3 months later...

I have a contact for real (not farmed) wild rice. I get my wild rice for many years from them. Wild rice gathered and prepared the traditional way on thier own property.

Let me find out if they have enough to sell to more people.

If you are interested.

dcarch

Edited by dcarch (log)
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Rancho Gordo sells wild rice. I don't know how "wild" it is, but I do know it's delicious.

I'm sure if anyone wants to know any more about the provenance, all you'd have to do is to email him.

http://www.ranchogordo.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=RG&Product_Code=3WIL&Category_Code=GAR6#.Um61S0ko7UM

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Rancho Gordo sells wild rice. I don't know how "wild" it is, but I do know it's delicious.

I'm sure if anyone wants to know any more about the provenance, all you'd have to do is to email him.

http://www.ranchogordo.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=RG&Product_Code=3WIL&Category_Code=GAR6#.Um61S0ko7UM

Those are farmed.

Real wild rice look very different.

dcarch

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Rancho Gordo sells wild rice. I don't know how "wild" it is, but I do know it's delicious.

I'm sure if anyone wants to know any more about the provenance, all you'd have to do is to email him.

http://www.ranchogordo.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=RG&Product_Code=3WIL&Category_Code=GAR6#.Um61S0ko7UM

This is cultivated "rice" grown in California. It's not what I was looking for. It has its own taste and texture, which I, and many others, like, but it ain't the same as the wild stuff.

 ... Shel


 

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I have a contact for real (not farmed) wild rice. I get my wild rice for many years from them. Wild rice gathered and prepared the traditional way on thier own property.

Let me find out if they have enough to sell to more people.

If you are interested.

I am interested. I once got wild rice from a group of native Americans in Minnesota, harvested and dried in the traditional manner. It was wonderful, and I'm looking for a recco for something similar. Until recently, I didn't know there was a difference between cultivated and true wild rice.

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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I generally buy my wild rice from one of the local stands (and I'm sorry I'm not in a position to just bundle and ship some to those of you looking!) but I don't know which of the bands harvests it. I do see, however, that some of the listings in rotuts' link provide hand-parched wild rice. I'd select that over the not-parched rice; in my experience it cooks up a bit more quickly and comes out more fluffy.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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We have several wild rice producers in this area -- I just sent off a couple of emails to ask if they are cultivated or . .'wild'.

For those of you who have tried both, do they taste that different from each other? What's the difference - flavour? texture?

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OK. . I heard back from the local companies. The question is whether you can get your hands on it. . the links will take you to contact info and/or where to buy info if you'd like to see if it's available near you or if they'll ship.

Shoal Lake Wild Rice sells wild rice under a few names and the Oh Canada and Floating Leaf brands are not cultivated.

And Wild Man Ricing sent me a brochure which says this about their wild rice:

"is harvested exclusively in natural bodies of water as opposed to being cultivated or paddy-grown"

( I sent a follow-up email to this one, asking if the rice is available in the US or if Americans can order it - will let you know what I find out.)

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From Wild Man Ricing, " yes we can ship to the USA preferably a little more than a pound at a time or freight will be expensive"

You can contact them for shipping info if you're interested.

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I used to order from Bineshi but since Amazon began carrying it, I order from them. This is an excellent wild rice.

Years ago, when I was still doing some catering, I ordered from Indian Harvest but the amounts are too large for regular consumers.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Thank you, Andie! Very convenient in fact. Would you mind sharing your favorite recipe for it? Thanks

I can't begin to favor one over another. Mushroom/Wild rice pilaf is good but I recommend a little book, only 76 pages

101 Favorite Wild Rice Recipes, by Duane R. Lund which used to be practically impossible to find but is now available from Amazon!

I should order a new one because mine is falling apart - I bought it at the local gourmet shop that went out of business in 1997 - so you can guess how old it is.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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The current issue of "Saveur" (November 2013) has a source for wild rice. The name is Native Harvest. They sell 8 ounce bags for $9.00. They can be contacted at (218) 375-4602. Their web site is nativeharvest.com.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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The current issue of "Saveur" (November 2013) has a source for wild rice. The name is Native Harvest. They sell 8 ounce bags for $9.00. They can be contacted at (218) 375-4602. Their web site is nativeharvest.com.

I'm familiar with Native Harvest. Based on what I found on their site, I didn't buy from them. Their price for a pound of wild rice is $12.50 + shipping, which is $5.95 for the cheapest, slowest way. I bought 2-lbs, hand harvested and hand parched, including shipping, for somewhat less than $20.00, received it in two days.

 ... Shel


 

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"" I bought 2-lbs, hand harvested and hand parched, including shipping, for somewhat less than $20.00, received it in two days. ""

I must have missed something. who did you buy from, and did you enjoy it? think it was worth it? Youd do it again ?

thanks

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I've made purchases from Native Harvest, and from a place in Minnesota call Christmas Point. While Christmas Point was less expensive than Native Harvest, it was still more $ than what you found.

FWIW, 2 pounds will make a huge amount of rice. Typically, I soak a cup overnight, and the volume increases perhaps 4 fold. Then cooking doubles that. Takes quite awhile to become soft. At first, the house smells like grass, then like nuts.

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"" I bought 2-lbs, hand harvested and hand parched, including shipping, for somewhat less than $20.00, received it in two days. ""

I must have missed something. who did you buy from, and did you enjoy it? think it was worth it? Youd do it again ?

thanks

I just received the rice on Thursday last, so I've not tried it yet.

 ... Shel


 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have been very happy with the wild rice I have gotten in the past from Earthy Delights. They source it from Manitoba and sell it by the pound (around $10 per + shipping) under the name Canadian Lake Wild Rice.

Here is a link to a blog post detailing the provenance of the rice along with a recipe for Wild Rice Cakes, Earthy's e-commerce store can be found at earthy.com

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