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Cheeseburgers a la Sous Vide


Jason Perlow
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A: I'm surprised at Jason for buying pre-ground beef. What, you don't have a grinder attachment for your Kitchen Aid?

B: If I see one more Publix product, I'm gonna scream...

A: 4th of July, Publix was a madhouse and Penn Dutch and Western Beef was closed.

B: Publix's meat department will ground fresh to order. On the 4th of July, they were grinding nonstop and putting meat out and selling it like it was the Apocalypse.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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looks deliciouus

esp. the cut-in-1/2 from the article

is you freeze for keeping the shape in a vacuum bag first, does this effect the final burger in any way you can tell?

The freeze really did nothing to affect the taste or the enjoyment of the final burger in any tangible way.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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From Jason's description it would seem thet from startt to finish may have bene around two hours? Was it that much better than a way that would cook a seared rare burger in a lot less time?

I hope that Jason does not go off the deep end.

Well, if you were to prep and then freeze the burgers, and then cooked them, about 2 hours. However, if you froze the burgers ahead of time, one hour, plus the mise-en-place prep and the sear (10 minutes?)

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Jason - welcome to the dark side!

Next I want you to take a nice steak (sirloin or strip loin) - a couple of hours at 54.5 C - heat your BGE to something between 600 F and 800 F. Dry well, salt well - minute or so on each side to get things nice and grilled.

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Jason - welcome to the dark side!

Next I want you to take a nice steak (sirloin or strip loin) - a couple of hours at 54.5 C - heat your BGE to something between 600 F and 800 F. Dry well, salt well - minute or so on each side to get things nice and grilled.

That's one of the next things on the list, along with seafood. But I probably won't bother to sear on the BGE because I primarily have it set up for low temp smoking. I only grill on it towards the end of a long smoke, so maybe if I coordinate the process. I'd probably sear on the gas weber or a cast iron pan.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Yar

a nice steak (sirloin or strip loin) or your favorite. for me sirloin strips are very nice and cheeep frugal

temp is just right: 130.1 the .1 is for the FoodPolice.

Id age in the refrig for 3 - 4 days. or not

then 6 hrs at 130. chill then Egg It.

this does require Pre-Planning.

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the stunning "value" of SV is if you can do these SV things in 'bulk' 6 - 8 pieces say

then save and enjoy another day. you finish each one of course

also SV 'rare' makes a very nice thin cut sandwich on a Very Hot Day.

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Nice start. I've done SV hamburgers a few times. In my experience, grinding fresh makes a big difference. Cut of meat makes a big difference as well. The time I did SV burgers with 100% short rib meat was noticeably "beefier" than other cuts I meat I tried. I also have to say that I disagree with your admonition to use lean ground beef, unless this is for health purposes we found that the standard 80% lean was still the best just like it is for a conventional hamburger.

These are all quibbles and individual preference issues, though. One thing I would definitely encourage you to do the next time you try SV hamburgers is deep frying them around 30 seconds at very high temperature to finish rather than frying them in a pan. You will get an amazingly beefy, Maillardized, crispy crust all the way around with virtually no cooking of the interior.

Modernist Cuisine at Home suggests salting the meat before forming and letting it sit for an hour before cooking. This resulted in a beefier flavor, to my palate, but I found the texture a bit too "sausage-like" for my taste. I might try this again but only rest for 20 minutes or so after salting.

--

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Nice start. I've done SV hamburgers a few times. In my experience, grinding fresh makes a big difference. Cut of meat makes a big difference as well. The time I did SV burgers with 100% short rib meat was noticeably "beefier" than other cuts I meat I tried. I also have to say that I disagree with your admonition to use lean ground beef, unless this is for health purposes we found that the standard 80% lean was still the best just like it is for a conventional hamburger.

These are all quibbles and individual preference issues, though. One thing I would definitely encourage you to do the next time you try SV hamburgers is deep frying them around 30 seconds at very high temperature to finish rather than frying them in a pan. You will get an amazingly beefy, Maillardized, crispy crust all the way around with virtually no cooking of the interior.

Modernist Cuisine at Home suggests salting the meat before forming and letting it sit for an hour before cooking. This resulted in a beefier flavor, to my palate, but I found the texture a bit too "sausage-like" for my taste. I might try this again but only rest for 20 minutes or so after salting.

We're having 20 people over at the house tomorrow so this was a dry run. We're doing Sous Vide burgers (1/4lb) as well as Mojo-marinated seared Sous Vide Chicken Thighs over Arroz Con Gandules which are going to be cooked in the rendered juices from the chicken. Beef we are using again is fresh ground 93 percent.

At some point I will probably also try this with ground turkey burgers with herbs in the bag, maybe even a fattier cut of beef. But yes, primarily for health reasons and I think that these end up being so juicy anyway there's no need to amp it up in my opinion. You're already using the most juice preserving tech possible.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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