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Msk

Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine" (Part 2)

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I made Modernist scrambled eggs and they were so insanely good my head almost exploded.

I blended them with my immersion blender. Cooked them for 25mins at 162. It was more an egg pudding than a scrambled egg. The flavor was amazing, and the consistency and texture unlike any eggs i've ever had.

I will say they were a little greasy from so much butter. Next time i'll reduce the amount by 50% or so.

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I plan on doing a more formal write up on my website for each item, starting this Sunday with the soup. Until then, as promised, some pictures.

Caramelized carrot soup with carrot top garnish:

013%20edit%20wm.jpg

Oh...this is sooo pretty! I love the dark orange color.

Bravo!

L


hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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So, we bought some dry ice and since you can't buy less than 10lbs at a time locally we had a lot of dry ice for food experimentation.

First, tried carbonated strawberry milkshakes. Didn't work out so well, but that is likely due to the fact that we did not have any strawberries, fructose, or locust bean gum to use. Instead, tried blueberries, blackberries and raspberries with table sugar (gluc-fruc mixture) and xanthan gum. Came out more like a pudding than milkshake. Other problem we had was that the if the mix was thick enough, it was hard to get the dry ice to disperse properly and cool the whole drink. Ended up with pockets of dry ice and cold sections. We tried to blend the dry ice with the mixture and that distributed the dry ice throughout the milkshake better. However, in the end, the texture wasn't the greatest. I would still like to try the official recipe sometime, but it is hard to find fructose or locust bean gum locally.

Second, we carbonated a mix of fruits and vegetables in our fridge. Tried blueberries, raspberries, grapes, bananas, tangerines, and cherry tomatoes. By far the best was cherry tomatoes. They were really great carbonated. Raspberries were good as well. Tangerines partially froze in the 12 hour carbonation process (they had the skin on).

So we had a bunch of dry ice left over, and this inspired us to try "Carbonated Rum Punch". This was so good that we ran out of rum! Here is the recipe we put together:

1 part fresh lime juice

2 parts sugar syrup

3 parts rum

4 parts store bought passionfruit/tangerine juice

Mixed together and then cooled and carbonated with dry ice. Poured, then added dashes of bitters and nutmeg.

We liked Whiskey Barrel Aged Bitters and Grapefruit Britters the best. The effect of putting the dry ice into the pitcher of rum punch was a nice touch and the fizzy nature of the drink was really subtle, but good.

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Id like to add a dry ice caution:

years ago I fiddled with similar drinks

as you know: dont touch the dry ice, especially with wet fingers.

and more importantly make sure you get a food grade dry ice. dry ice for cooling is probably not food grade and you will be drinking a lot of interesting petro-chemicals.

:blink:

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A question regarding the Halibut Brandade (p. 5•152): Step 5 is to bring the soaked halibut to 58°C and hold it there for fifteen minutes. What is the purpose of the fifteen-minute hold time? Is that just to infuse the garlic flavor? Or is there a food-safety issue?


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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One more bacon question. Most of mine is doing fine (2 days left before smoking!) but two pieces have a bit of light discoloration on it. Most of it is bright red/pinkish color but a few pieces have spots of a light brown. It doesn't look like mold or anything growing on it, just a different color. I'm not sure if that's a sign of spoilage (it's been in the fridge < 40 degrees the whole time) or maybe I didn't get any of the cure on that piece there or it's just moisture leaving or what. Does anyone have any knowledge on the topic?

Phaz, you're probably just fine. If you can photograph, we might be able to say more, but it sounds like an area that's desiccated a bit more than the other areas: pretty typical stuff.

Here is a link to the bacon in question. The flash is making it a bit more yellow than it is but without the flash it didn't show the contrast. There are a total of 3 with a bit of that yellow/brown color(the 3rd just had a small spot).

I tried the volume 5 short ribs Friday and have to echo what Chris said. They are phenomenal. If you are considering making them, do it.

The flank steak strands were full of flavor and easier to deal with than I expected them to be. The only changes I had to make were using brown sugar instead of palm and not being able to find any birds eye chili so I left those out. Everything else I followed (including making the tamarind paste).

When I first tried the ribs after taking them out of the bath (eating a little meat that was left on the bone after cutting them off) they were quite tender but not a lot of flavor so I was worried (every other time I did short ribs there was a dry rub, salt & pepper or some sauce in the bag). However, the flavor this dish has is amazing. It really all comes from the sauce. My sauce never quite got to 'coat the back of a spoon' thick but I took it out when it reduced to about 340 grams worth. Just a little coating of that on the ribs was all the flavor they needed.

Truly astounding. I'm for sure going to make them again.

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Id like to add a dry ice caution:

years ago I fiddled with similar drinks

as you know: dont touch the dry ice, especially with wet fingers.

and more importantly make sure you get a food grade dry ice. dry ice for cooling is probably not food grade and you will be drinking a lot of interesting petro-chemicals.

:blink:

Yes, thank-you for your warnings - safety with any chemical is important. Dry ice happens to be one of the "safest" chemicals I have handled over the years given my work history. As for quality, I got our dry ice from a reputable gas company. As an aside, it was really nice to see MC spend some time discussing the safe handling of both CO2 and LN2 since many cooks don't have science backgrounds.

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Made MC Mac-n-cheese with some 3 year gouda and sharp cheddar. Outstanding.

Any suggestions on improvising this recipe for fondue? Ski season is over but I am thinking about next year's apre ski.

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Not really an MC recipe, but i based this on the pressure cooked Tarbais beans where calcium chloride is added to the pressure cooker.

I used the ratio that the tarbais beans recipe uses which i think is 0.67% of the beans. I had a question though. In Volume 3 when it discusses use of calcium chloride it says to use 1g per 100 of water in the pressure cooker. The Tarbais bean recipe only uses 1g for 400g of water. The amount used in this recipe (0.25% of the water) worked well. The skins held the beans together very well over 1.5 hrs of pressure cooking. I imagine using 4x this amount would give a very hard skin...wouldn't it?

Pork and beans:

IMG_3472-2.jpg


Edited by jmolinari (log)

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Me, either. The yellow is not for the faint of heart....

Yeah, like I said, it's a bit more yellow because of the flash, but did have a noticeable color change. I decided to cut it off and it was only the very surface of the meat, under that it looked fine. I have it in the smoker right now (just under an hour left) but have those 3 pieces marked so I can decide what to do with them.

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Can I speed up the brining process for the pastrami recipe if I brine under vacuum pressure? Rather than brining in a sous vide bag, I am considering brining using a vacuum canister. Any ideas on how this would impact the necessary brining time? I'm planning to use boneless short rib - I'll save the Wagyu cheek for my second attempt.


SCOTT HEIMENDINGER
Co-Founder, CMO

Sansaire

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I think you need to pulse the vacuum pressure to have any appreciable affect on the brine time. Pulling vacuum removed air from the pores of the meat, but you need to release the vacuum to allow the brine to fill the (now void) pores. Here's an interesting paper on the topic.

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Thank you guys for the tips - those both sound like great ideas.

So, how can I tell when the meat is "done" brining? (I don't have a salinity meter.)


SCOTT HEIMENDINGER
Co-Founder, CMO

Sansaire

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So, how can I tell when the meat is "done" brining? (I don't have a salinity meter.)

You could use a multimeter, if you've got one. You'll want to build a test cell though, and you'll probably want to calibrate your setup. More info on using a multimeter as a salinometer here.

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You can also tell by weight - there are instructions in the book that talk about how to do that.

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I'm working on Infusing Flavor into a Liquid and have a question. I'm making Prosciutto water to use instead of regular plain old water in my pizza dough hoping that there will be a nice subtle prosciutto-iness to the dough. It's a 30% by weight mixture and I'm sous vide cooking it at 80C for 2 hours. I'll then drop the water down to about 40C in order to get it to the right temperature for my pizza dough recipe. It will sit out for about 12 hours and then cold rise in the fridge for 3 to 4 days followed by about 4 more hours at room temperature before cooking.

Now for my question, should I be boiling the prosciutto water before bringing it down to 40C given how long it will be out. I'm thinking no because it is cured but I don't really know. Anyone try something similar and care to comment on results? I've never heard of anyone infusing pizza dough water this way but I'm guessing it's been done. Anyone try infusing water for other unconventional purposes?

rg

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I don't think the prosciutto water should be a problem, primarily because you're baking the dough and the temperature of the finished dough will surely kill anything in it. Great idea btw...

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This isn't really cooking I suppose, but I was interested in the Heat-Treated Fruit (3-359) concept and if it really worked. Last week, I brought home some great looking strawberries from Whole Foods and decided to do an experiment. Following the Best Bets for strawberries (60C for 15 seconds), I soaked one strawberry in a 60C water bath for 15 seconds and set it on a plate with an un-soaked strawberry as a control, keeping both at room temperature (about 20C).

The treated strawberry did indeed last longer than the untreated -- 8 days vs. 4 days respectively before the first sign of mold. I can't say that either one looked great at day 3 or 4 (compared with when they came from the store), but if mold prevention is what you are looking for it seems the heat treatment works. See photo sequence below.

I may repeat the experiment in the summer when I can get really fresh strawberries at the farmers market. I'll also probably add a third strawberry soaked in room-temperature water for 15 seconds to see if it's the water or the temperature that provides the benefit.

Has anyone else had good results heat treating fruits?

Strawberries.jpg

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This isn't really cooking I suppose, but I was interested in the Heat-Treated Fruit (3-359) concept and if it really worked. Last week, I brought home some great looking strawberries from Whole Foods and decided to do an experiment. Following the Best Bets for strawberries (60C for 15 seconds), I soaked one strawberry in a 60C water bath for 15 seconds and set it on a plate with an un-soaked strawberry as a control, keeping both at room temperature (about 20C).

The treated strawberry did indeed last longer than the untreated -- 8 days vs. 4 days respectively before the first sign of mold. I can't say that either one looked great at day 3 or 4 (compared with when they came from the store), but if mold prevention is what you are looking for it seems the heat treatment works. See photo sequence below.

I may repeat the experiment in the summer when I can get really fresh strawberries at the farmers market. I'll also probably add a third strawberry soaked in room-temperature water for 15 seconds to see if it's the water or the temperature that provides the benefit.

Has anyone else had good results heat treating fruits?

Did the heat treatment make any difference in taste\texture?

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Simple cooking from Modernist Cuisine last night - cooked shrimp at 140 for 7 minutes and served with the MC remoulade sauce. Sauce was excellent (nothing modernist about it, mostly just mayo, mustard, and a lot of lemon juice) and the shrimp had the perfect texture for that type of application.

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