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Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 4)


Marlene
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Over the last couple of weeks I've added Martha Stewarts Baking handbook and Hors D'ouevres book; Cucina Ebraica and the Pied Noir Cookbook (French Sephardic Cuisine from Algeria).

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I found a book at a library booksale that I've taken out of the library several times: Linda Dannenberg's "Paris Bistro Cooking".  It will be nice to have this alongside her book "Paris Boulangerie and Patisserie".

Waaah. I want PBC next to MY copy of PB&P.

Yesterday scored for a buck a crispy-newlike Mayhaw-Man-endorsed Cotton Country Collection. Have been meaning to buy regular-price for ages, but the gods of thrift shopping finally hadda step in. Happens.

We share a mutual envy, Priscilla---I bet I would really like the "Cotton Country Collection" as well.

It may be too difficult to describe, but how do you see it fitting in with other Southern Cookbooks, if you have them. (Maybe if I look back at Mayhaw Man's previous posts I can get an idea here as well.) A silly question probably, but are the recipes mainly Cajun/Creole?

I found some of Mayhaw Man's comments and looked at Amazon comments--this goes on my list... :smile:

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I found a book at a library booksale that I've taken out of the library several times: Linda Dannenberg's "Paris Bistro Cooking".  It will be nice to have this alongside her book "Paris Boulangerie and Patisserie".

Waaah. I want PBC next to MY copy of PB&P.

Yesterday scored for a buck a crispy-newlike Mayhaw-Man-endorsed Cotton Country Collection. Have been meaning to buy regular-price for ages, but the gods of thrift shopping finally hadda step in. Happens.

We share a mutual envy, Priscilla---I bet I would really like the "Cotton Country Collection" as well.

It may be too difficult to describe, but how do you see it fitting in with other Southern Cookbooks, if you have them. (Maybe if I look back at Mayhaw Man's previous posts I can get an idea here as well.) A silly question probably, but are the recipes mainly Cajun/Creole?

Ludja, of course it goes without saying, although I shall say it anyways, that Mayhaw Man is a font of ineffable stature on this topic. He did drop the the irresistible tidbit somewheres that female Hamaker antecedents contributed to CCC, which is pretty much what made me add it to the old ongoing mental list.

CCC is a Junior League compilation cookbook, so there is a touch of that which is typical to the genre. But this Junior League is from Monroe, LA, so there's a lot else besides.

The Southern cookbooks I have relied upon as an amateur-hobbyist if not the dread enthusiast have been Chef Paul Prudhomme's, as well as Craig Claiborne's Southern Cooking, an underappreciated gem.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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Though I hang my head in shame to admit it, I must say that I have a new cookbook - Patsy's Cookbook, courtesy of Frank Sinatra's favorite eatery on 56th Street in Manhattan. Given to me as a gag hostess gift by my friends Miles and Hall, who got it as an audience gift when they went to see a taping of Martha last week.

So ashamed.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Since I last posted here, I've added 14 books to my collection and 6 more are on their way.

So, plus 20 for me.

Edited to add: Megan, don't be ashamed. Be proud, be very, very proud. I mean, you could be addicted to something much worse - that's my excuse anyway.

Edited by rajsuman (log)
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Ludja, of course it goes without saying, although I shall say it anyways, that Mayhaw Man is a font of ineffable stature on this topic.  He did drop the the irresistible tidbit somewheres that female Hamaker antecedents contributed to CCC, which is pretty much what made me add it to the old ongoing mental list.

CCC is a Junior League compilation cookbook, so there is a touch of that which is typical to the genre.  But this Junior League is from Monroe, LA, so there's a lot else besides.

The Southern cookbooks I have relied upon as an amateur-hobbyist if not the dread enthusiast have been Chef Paul Prudhomme's, as well as Craig Claiborne's Southern Cooking, an underappreciated gem.

Thanks Priscilla! I need to look at Craig Claiborne's book again as well.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Since I last added to the tally in December, I have acquired Cook's Family Cookbook (from my son for Christmas), an old Marcela Hazan, all the Best Food Writing books except 2005 (any offers?) Fork it Over by Alan Richman, Women Who Eat, and a few more, so add 10 for me. (And DON'T ask me about bookshelves, please! :angry: ) :laugh:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Regarding the Cotton Country Collection, the Chocolate Peppermint Cookies on page 444 were a huge hit with my friends. I made them during the height of summer last year and the chocolate topping melted a little, but there were no leftovers.

Recently added to my collection:

Chinese Homestyle Cooking by Wang Jinhuai and Xue Yuan

A Cook's Tour of Shreveport by the Junior league of Shreveport

The Gift of Southern Cooking by Edna Lewis and Scott Peacock

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Thanks for the additional comments on the Cotton Country Collection.

I've been lucky finding used books lately and found one that has been on my "list" for a long time: Mimi Sheraton's "The German Cookbook".

I also picked up a copy of Viana La Place and Evan Kleiman's, "Cucina Fresca". I have really enjoyed and cooked a lot out of another book of theirs, "Cucina Rustica".

Also found a remainder paper copy of "Saveur Cooks Authentic French". The photos are incredibly inspiring and there are also many good recipes that complement my the other French cookbooks in my collection.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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  • 3 weeks later...

I had a very successful buy at the Seattle Friends of the Library sale. Forty new books, 38 of which were cookbooks. Great bargains including 2 La Techniques and one La Methode for a total of $10. My total outlay was $98 and I'm thrilled with them all from Fog City Diner to The Art of South American Cooking by Felipe Rojas-Lombardi and The Victory Garden Cookbook by Marian Morash. And a Paula Wolfert, a Richard Olney and a Jane Grigson. Now, to make shelf space.

Judy Amster

Cookbook Specialist and Consultant

amsterjudy@gmail.com

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Four more from Jessica's Biscuit including The All American Cheese and Wine Book by Laura Werlin which is terrific. Both the recipes and info are very useable.

Judy Amster

Cookbook Specialist and Consultant

amsterjudy@gmail.com

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I have to say that I was just beginning to feel guilty about my cookbook fetish, thinking that I had perhaps become unreasonable, then I found this thread...

Well, I am feeling much better now.

It never even occurred to me to count my cookbooks but based on a brief scan and some ragged estimates I have about 200 cookbooks, which I now realize is a totally reasonable number of cookbooks to own. I am not counting favourite archived food magazines and food related books mind you because I just don't have the time nor the inclination. However, I feel a burden lifted from my shoulders in knowing that I am not alone in my irrational gathering of all things food related.

I use mine mainly for reference. If I do follow a recipe I tend to refer to 3 or 4 cookbooks at the same time. I have also come to the realization that I have yet to follow a recipe to the letter. I went through a phase of trying to follow recipes but I seem to incapable of doing so without constant adjustment. I am not sure why this is. I wish that I were more scientific in my approach and less intuitive, but I have always had a problem with authority.

Thanks to all of you for making me feel better.

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I picked up 5 books last week. Four of them not really worth mentioning (they were $1.99 each - I didn't really need them). The fifth was a great kosher cookbook - for $3.99. (I think kosher cookbooks go on clearance frequently in North Dakota :wink: )

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The fifth was a great kosher cookbook - for $3.99. (I think kosher cookbooks go on clearance frequently in North Dakota wink.gif

Pam, that made my day. I giggled like mad.

I'll find the calculator tomorrow. Beddy byes now.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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another half dozen joined us recently!

Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

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Can I count historic "cookbooks" in the form of pdf files, scans, cut-and-paste Word documents as well as "real" cookbooks? it would be impossible as an individual to actually own many of the classic historic cookbooks (except where there are facsimiles available) of the eighteenth century and before, but I seem to have a goodly collection of electronic versions. At least they dont take up bookshelf space because there is none left in this house!

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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Score! Julia Child's "Volume One: Mastering the Art of French Cooking" hardback with dust jacket for 50¢ :shock: at a local church yard sale.

edited for clarity

Edited by Toliver (log)

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Good score, Tolliver. I'm sending it over the psychic cookbook transom that you will find the companion volume similarly.

Two recent additions for me, both Keith Floyds: Floyd on Britain & Ireland and his autobiography, Floyd in the Soup.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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I need more bookshelves. 4 more for me including two WS Mastering series, Vegetables and Sauces, and two others which I have to go downstairs to look at the names. But one has something to do with "Perfect recipes for having people over" or something like that.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Two more for me; Plain and Fancy from the Richardson, TX Junior League, and Yankee Church Supper Cookbook. Love the Friends of the Library! :wub:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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