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Marlene

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 4)

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A little over 400, and I want to go live with Maggiethecat .

The line forms behind me! :biggrin:

I've picked up 5 more since my last post here:

Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn

Julie & Julia by Julie Powell

Will Write for Food by Dianne Jacob

Best Food Writing 2005 edited by Holly Hughes

Austin Leslie's Creole Soul by the late Austin J. Leslie and Marie Budd Posey

=R=

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Dang! 102, 073.

(KitchenQueen and ronnie -- we have a guest room and a fold-out couch. C'mon down!)

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JAZ   

I can't remember when I last updated my count, so I'm guessing here. At the very least, I've acquired Secrets From a Caterer's Kitchen, La Cocina de Mama, Candies, Truffles and Confections, Boulevard, Proscuitto, Pancetta Salame (the latest from Pamela Sheldon Johns), and Rick Tramato's Amuse-Bouche, which I found on sale for $5. So that's six.

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Flocko   

Hi Maggie:

27 new since my last post here, including Ruth Reichl's "Garlic and Sapphires" and FG's new opus!!

Bill

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Fortunately, I just sold 42. We can now see the floor in the front hall closet. Unfortunately, the money is going to a few new cook books. Kiddle is becoming interested in braising, roasting, Asian whole fish dishes and such. Must also remind self, check fire extinguisher.


Edited by Rebecca263 (log)

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judiu   

Add one to my total; Southern Living 2005 Annual. I also got a Burt Greene from Chris, but since that was from a fellow e-Gullet member, it was already accounted for. :raz: Still no Nero Wolfe yet, Amazon is playing the stall... :angry:

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Safran   

Hé, Maggie,

Two more for me: The Silver Spoon and Mangoes & Curry Leaves...

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Add Fuchsia Dunlop's Land of Plenty. $6.98 at Half Price Books. They never have a clue what these books are worth, thankfully.

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heyjude   

26 used and 5 new for me including Mango and Curry Leaves, Rover's, The Herbal Kitchen and some nice Elizabeth David Penguins, A Harold McGee and a Richard Olney Simple French Food. I have room for about a dozen more. I have to rearrange the linen closet.

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rjwong   

Add one more: Il Cucchiaio d'argento (in English). Yes, it's The silver spoon.

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3 for me - Martha Stewart's Hors d'Oeurves, one each by Rick Bayless and Todd English. Still have some on my wish list - I still think I have a problem :shock:

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Add one for me - my friend Louisa bought me the Gourmet cookbook as a hostess gift for having her to stay this weekend. Two points:

a) Lou, you rock!!!

b) I cannot believe I didn't own this...I think I bought four copies last year and gave them all away as gifts... :laugh:

ETA: Make that TWO more for me...just got my eBay-ed copy of "Mmmmmm: A Feastiary," by Ruth Reichl.


Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

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Add Fuchsia Dunlop's Land of Plenty.  $6.98 at Half Price Books.  They never have a clue what these books are worth, thankfully.

As a Chinese-American (parent's from Szechaun and Hunan). I love this book! Its the only authentic Szechaun cookbook written in English that I've found.

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WHS   

Just bought "Bouchon" for $15 at Building 19 in Nashua! $50 retail...

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Mottmott   

Oh Lordy, it's been a long time since I've updated. Add about 25 or so that I bought at Atlantic. Then I bought about 6 on baking, including Baker's Apprentice, Silverton's bread baking, Baker's Dozen, elsewhere another 10 including Wolfert's Slow Mediterranean, Stevens' on braising, Bouchon. I've run out of room in my cookbook bookcase. I need to cull the herd.

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judiu   

Let's see; I just unwrapped All About Brasing :wub: and at the Library sale I found The Art Of French Cooking and five more "generic" Junior League books, so that's seven more for me. Gotta get those bookshelves built! :rolleyes:

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Kim D   

I finally got around to counting my cookbooks. If I found them all, I have 140.

Yesterday, my copy of The Bread Baker's Apprentice arrived.

Today, just as I was despairing of receiving them before Christmas, the postman arrived bearing:

Mangoes & Curry Leaves

Desserts by Pierre Herme

All About Braising

What more could I want?

Well, I know the answer to that. I want Saha but it won't be published in the USA until September 2006. It's on my wishlist.

- Kim

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This is probably the wrong place to post about my newly-received Kenny Loggins Christmas cd but I did also receive 4 cookbooks for Christmas/Hanukkah this morning:

A Baker's Tour by Nick Malgieri

Carlos' Contemporary French Cuisine by Debbie and Carlos Nieto

(with Arlene Michlin Bronstein and Ken Bookman)

The Best Recipes in the World by Mark Bittman

Tapas - A Taste of Spain in America by Jose Andres

(with Richard Wolffe)

=R=

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Alex   

Two Chanukah presents from Ms. Alex:

The Silver Spoon

Mangoes & Curry Leaves (Jeffrey Alford & Naomi Duguid)

And a present from myself, via eBay:

Italian Family Cooking (Edward Giobbi)

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