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Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 3)


chile_peppa
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Two more for me: The Chez Piggy Cookbook from that wonderful restaurant in Kingston, Ontario and, hot off the press, the May Court Club of Ottawa Menu Cookbook.... :wub: The proceeds from the salle of this cookbook go towards a program that provides healthy snacks for hungry children in Ottawa area schools....

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Two more for me:  The Chez Piggy Cookbook from that wonderful restaurant in Kingston, Ontario and, hot off the press, the May Court Club of Ottawa Menu Cookbook....  :wub: The proceeds from the salle of this cookbook go towards a program that provides healthy snacks for hungry children in Ottawa area schools....

er, I read that as the "Miss Piggy Cookbook" at first and did a doubletake when the restaurant was mentioned!

I'm pretty new, and haven't read through this whole topic yet, but I'm looking forward to checking out recommendations, and maybe getting around to counting our books. We have about 20 linear feet of bookshelves, if that's any indication.

Our big score this week was Howard Mitcham's Provincetown Seafood Cookbook, which we'd been looking for after seeing it mentioned in Kitchen Confidential. We picked it up for $8 and found out it was listed for between $50 and $100 on Amazon!

You gonna eat that?

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Three more for me.All About Braising,by Molly Stevens; and it is HOT here right now(whine).Also The Little Foods of the Mediterranean, by Clifford Wright and Molto Italiano, by Mario Batali.

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Two more for me:  The Chez Piggy Cookbook from that wonderful restaurant in Kingston, Ontario and, hot off the press, the May Court Club of Ottawa Menu Cookbook....  :wub: The proceeds from the sale of this cookbook go towards a program that provides healthy snacks for hungry children in Ottawa area schools....

ed. for sp.

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Whee! Our mail carrier just delivered my "Mitford Cookbook and Kitchen Reader", :biggrin: and I have a s#it load of Southern Living Annuals and a batch of 6 other books coming from e-bay :wub: Boy, am I gonna be a readin' fool! :raz:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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:biggrin: I have stopped counting...However, I just received Alfred Portale's "Simple Pleasures" which has the most wonderful recipe for Chocolate-Grand Marnier Cake. The intense chocolate and suble orange flavors are fabulous!!
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I count 240 here.

I think the most unusual is Kitchen Confidential translated into Mandarin Chinese.

(PS I just read the entire 58 pages of this thread--making notes all the way. Think I have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome now, though!)

You gonna eat that?

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93, 241. It must have not passed unntoced that I haven't had a new cookbook since "Bouchon" at Christmastime and "Cooking of Trinidad" in February. I was cruising the capri pants at TJ Maxx today and found Tamasin Day-Lewis's "Tarts With Tops On" for seven dollars. Pie. Yum.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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93,800.  Welcome, all newcomers to this thread.  Can 100,000 be that far away?

So, what do we do for the 100,000 celebration?

Publish a cookbook? :biggrin:

Add The Tabasco Cookbook for me. I've no idea when I'll have time to use it, but hey, $7 at the hardware store...

Edited by Smithy (log)

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I am pained to admit that I've gotten so many since I last posted that I've lost count. They are new, used and gifts and are in every category: dessert and baking, ethnic, food lit, single subject, chef and restaurant and newspaper and magazine compilations. I'm too busy reading to cook. Let's be restrained and say 50.

Judy Amster

Cookbook Specialist and Consultant

amsterjudy@gmail.com

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Add two (or is it four?) more for me... so far!

Our State library is having its humongous annual book sale (100,000+ books -- some people even fly in from the mainland, planning their vacations around it).

First day of the sale (yesterday) I scored Culinaria: European Specialties brand new 2 volume set for $10, and a boxed 2-volume set of The Pasta Bible and The Chinese and Asian Kitchen Bible for another $10.

The book sale continues all this week, with them putting out fresh additions every day.

I'm salivating!!!

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Whee! Five more for me, all Southern Living Annuals from the '80s. They're replacements for ones that I'd been given by my mom as Christmas gifts. :sad: I miss her.

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Went to Ollie's yesterday and found two more: Good-Tempered Food and Vegetable Heaven. I have my eye on some others, but we're probably moving and the thought of boxing up all my cookbooks is appearing overwhelming.

Burgundy makes you think silly things, Bordeaux makes you talk about them, and Champagne makes you do them ---

Brillat-Savarin

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  • 2 weeks later...

Got a good one this week, R.S.V.P.: Menus for Entertaining from People Who Really Know How, by Nan Kempner, who died recently. She was already ill when profiled in Vanity Fair some months before, April's issue I think. The article showcased her funny, self-deprecating personality, and had a nice scene of her longtime cook serving lunch.

She was always my favorite of the handful of socialites said to be the models for Tom Wolfe's social x-rays, and her fashion sense (she was most famous for being an incredible clotheshorse) was absolute perfection, mixing the cream of couture with street-derived items in a fearless, influential way.

ANYway, this book, which is part Lifestyles of the Rich & Famous and part VF photo essay, has some very good menus from the cooks and chefs of Mrs. Kempner's friends. I also appreciate seeing the homes, some absolutely gauche, and others decorated with remarkable good taste.

There is a cold soup, a puree of raw green ingredients mostly, from I ferget which friend's cook, that I'll be making this 100-degree weekend.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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Added two more from the clearance table at my local liquidation bookstore. One was a Barnes & Noble "special" called The Asian Kitchen, edited by Lilian Wu. The recipes look to be a mixed bag as for authenticity, but they're photo-illustrated in the style of the Eyewitness children's books; so I thought it would be a good 'n for the kids to run with. The other was A Table in Tuscany, written and illustrated by Vancouver native Leslie Forbes (now a London-based illustrator). Very nice.

Price tag $2 CDN/ea.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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93, 241.  It must have not passed unntoced that I haven't had a new cookbook since "Bouchon" at Christmastime and "Cooking of Trinidad" in February. I was cruising the capri pants at TJ Maxx today and found Tamasin Day-Lewis's "Tarts With Tops On" for seven dollars.  Pie. Yum.

Hmmmm...I saw one of Day-Lewis' books at the liquidation store yesterday. Good, is she? I'd never heard of her, but the book was cheap enough...

The local library has its annual book sale on right now. I'm going to go down tomorrow and see how far $20 gets me.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Due to the extreme cooperation of Amazon, bookcloseouts, and Powell's, I find my self owning/waiting for delivery of 13 new cookbooks. Averaging about $8 each, plus a $2 grocery aisle find, they are:

The Jewish Holiday Kitchen by Nathan

Beard on Birds

Katish: Our Russian Cook

Mrs Witty's Home-Style Menu CB

The Good Stuff CB (also by Witty)

The Sweet Potato Queens' Big-Ass CB

James McNair's Favorites

Jim Coleman's Flavors

Damon Lee Flowler's New Southern Kitchen

Being Dead is No Excuse

The Cake Club

Pickled

Monday to Friday Chicken

Will check in with reports after they're all in.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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93,323.

Chromedome: Tamasin Day-Lewis appears to be the thinking man's Nigella. She has the same turbulent wild dark hair, but I don't think she's married to a advertising zillionaire and she doesn't lick her fingers and expose her cleavage. She may not be as obviously hot as Nigella, but geez, she's C.D. Lewis's daughter and Daniel Day-Lewis's sister. Pretty good blood lines.

And she is just excellent about pies, tarts and pastry, to say nothing of the best of British food. Give her a shot, if she's discounted.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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I think it was Day-Lewis' "Tarts with Tops On" that I saw, so I'll have to check next time I'm there. "Thinking man's Nigella" works for me.

The library book sale yielded a total of 20 items for $18, most of them not food-related. I did pick up the companion coil-ring recipe booklets for two of the Time-Life "Foods of the World" books I own (Chinese and Provincial French), as well as the "Good Cooking Cook Book" which features recipes by various luminaries including James Beard and Jacques Pepin. So I guess that's three more.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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