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chile_peppa

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 3)

596 posts in this topic

Speaking of the Time-Life Good Cook series, I have the complete set of 28--from "Beverages" to "Candy" and everything in between. I got them by subscription in the '80's and recall eagerly waiting for the next monthly volume. The series taught me a whole lot about real, genuine cooking.

Hate admitting to envy but I am JEALOUS! If the Beef/Veal volume is an indicator, this series is an incredible resource.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Pere Hugo -- definitely get the Bertolli! I no longer buy books for the recipes, but only for the reference material they contain, and this was a great addition to my shelves!  Keep checking for "used" copies on Amazon or on powells.com, or some of the other book-selling sites.

I agree that Cooking by Hand is a fantastic resource. I was lucky enough to receive a signed copy as a gift from a friend who is a server at Oliveto, but I notice that Amazon has it on sale right now for $28.00 and free shipping.

Even better, you can buy it bundled with Paula Wolfert's The Slow Mediterranean Kitchen for $51.07!

Cheers,

Squeat

Edit to add that you need to click the title on the page I linked to see the Wolfert combo deal.


Edited by Squeat Mungry (log)

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Speaking of recidivism, I've added at least 10 cookbooks to my collection since my last post. Offhand I can only remember 5, but they are

Bistro Cooking at Home

The Slow Mediterranean Kitchen

The Balthazar Cookbook

The French Chef (guess when I ordered that one? *sniff*)

some Turkish thing whose name escapes me at the moment

You'd think, judging by the way I pack 'em in, that I have loads of time on my hands for cooking. It's more like "occupying my weekends between playing with the puppy and kittens" but...well, they're so much fun! And have such great ideas! And when I do get into them, the results are glorious.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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It's been a while and I've really been good, but another Friends of the Library sale called to me. Even being very selective, I came away with 35 cookbooks, 19 of which were from the Time-Life Good Cooks series at $1 each. The latest Jessica's Biscuit catalog came in the mail last week and I've starred 68 titles to get after we move. No, not all at once. What have you all been getting?


Judy Amster

Cookbook Specialist and Consultant

amsterjudy@gmail.com

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I skipped the Library Book Sale, but received 7 older books as a late inheritance. Galloping Gourmet, vol. 2, something from 1949 with awful photos (I'll get the title posted one of these days - Cooking for Company?), some give-aways - I think from tobacco companies - a French/Italian paperback - reads front to back and back to front for each, meets in the middle with an ad. Jewish Cooking...


Edited by tsquare (log)

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Another three for me (all snagged on eBay):

Robert Wolke, What Einstein Told His Cook

Harold McGee, The Curious Cook

William Grimes, Straight Up or On the Rocks (does this one count?)

Squeat

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OK, I had to open up some boxes because I thought I was moving a few months ago. I currently have 47, but am waiting for 4 more to come from The Good Cook, and two more I won on Ebay. So that makes 52 (not counting all my back issues of Cooks Illustrated, Chili pepper, etc.)

Latest additions:

The Food of Italy

The Food of France

Saveur Authentic French Cooking

Pot Pies

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Mexican Cooking

America's Test Kitchen


"Homer, he's out of control. He gave me a bad review. So my friend put a horse head on the bed. He ate the head and gave it a bad review! True Story." Luigi, The Simpsons

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One more fun one from Bargain Books:

amuse-bouche, by Rick Tramonto with Mary Goodbody.


Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."
 

The mosque is too far from home, so let's do this / Let's make a weeping child laugh. -Nida Fazli, poet (translated, from the Urdu, by Anu Garg, wordsmith.org)

 

The greatest enemy of knowledge is the illusion of knowledge. -(origin unclear)

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:biggrin: I have to comment on the "rebirth" of my collection; I now, thanks to you good folks and the library store, have 27 cookbooks, plus the four I have on order from Jessica's Biscuit. I'm overwhelmed at the generosity y'all have shown me, and eternally grateful! :wub:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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think since my last post I have received or ordered another six - as follows:

Just One Pot - Lindsay Bareham

Sue Lawrence - on Baking

Nigella Lawson - Feast

Anthony Bourdain - Les Halles cookbook

Tamasin Day Lewis - Tarts with Tops On

Good Food - 101 cakes and bakes

err ... think that's it. Think I might have to do a belated new year resolution to cook at least one new recipe a week or fortnight to justify the number I have!

cheers

Yin

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And one more for me: Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook. Yay!!!!!!!!! I love that it comes in an almost-plain brown wrapper (which I have already stained with lamb fat). But I already found the phrase "ethereal fries" twice in just a few pages. Don't blame me; I offered to work on it. :biggrin:

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Think I might have to do a belated new year resolution to cook at least one new recipe a week or fortnight to justify the number I have!

cheers

Yin

That's a resolution a try to keep faithfully, and yes a sop to the conscience!

71,572.


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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That's a resolution a try to keep faithfully, and yes a sop to the conscience!

71,572.

22 more if you include Kitchen Confidential


From Dixon, Wyoming

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not quite sure but reckon it's around 50, also got 20 or so books on food science from peter barham to a record of the 17th science food fair somewhere in greece back in 1984.

oldest book, "366 menus from the Baron Brisse" which dates back to 1882.

current faves Oriel ballaguer "dessert cuisine", watch out for the recipes as some are a little more involved than looks on paper.

El Bulli 1998-02

Family Food - Hestn Blumenthal

On food and cooking - Harold McGee (re-release later this month)

Alex.


after all these years in a kitchen, I would have thought it would become 'just a job'

but not so, spending my time playing not working

www.e-senses.co.uk

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Jewish Cooking in America by Joan Nathan

The Book of Jewish Food by Claudia Roden

Plus I'm currently reading Mimi Sheraton's memoir Eating My Words, which I am enjoying so much that I have ordered The Bialy Eaters.

So 4 more for me. I'm trying to impose a temporary moratorium because I'm supposed to be saving money for my vacation, but it's so hard!

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whoops! forgot to confess to acquiring a penguin set of 10 classic cookbooks a little while back - Real Fast Puddings, Real Fast Food, (Nigel Slater) Italian Food, A Book of Mediterranean Food, Summer Cooking (Elizabeth David), English Food (Jane Grigson), A Celebration of Soup (Lindsay Bareham) and English Seafood Cookery (Rick Stein).

never mind that I had most of them already - the whole set only cost £10 so too good to pass up!

Yin

X

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I am now ready for the holidays with Move Over Santa, Ruby's Doin' Christmas by Ruby Ann Boxcar. If you want some light humor in your reading, I highly recommend checking out this book. There are even instructions on how to make a wooden spoon reindeer, Look out Martha, there is some competition coming your way from Arkansas.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.

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Just received three more as gifts.

A BBQ cookbook, Japanese cooking, and a book made by a non profit organization consisting of a lot of local favorite recipes.

Not many but I thought I would add them in to the thread.


"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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I just gone another one!! It's called Jewish Festival Cooking.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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