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chile_peppa

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 3)

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In a walk down memory lane with my mother today, we went through all of my dad's cookbooks. Score 15 more for me including an original signed volume of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume I - Julia Child and an original signed volume of The New York Times Cookbook - Craig Clairbourne. I'll post the other titles when I get them sorted, but those two stand out in my mind.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Two more for me, this weekend. I was at my local thrift store and spotted a dozen or so of the old Time-Life books on one of the shelves. I grabbed the French Provincial and Spain/Portugal volumes, and will be back for the others within the next day or two.


Fat=flavor

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In a walk down memory lane with my mother today, we went through all of my dad's cookbooks.  Score 15 more for me including an original signed volume of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume I - Julia Child and an original signed volume of The New York Times Cookbook - Craig Clairbourne.  I'll post the other titles when I get them sorted, but those two stand out in my mind.

Marlene, what a score! That NYTC has a great chocolate ice cream recipe in it, I'll add....


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I wandered into an antiques store today and came out $15 poorer, and 2 cookbooks richer:

Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen

and

San Francisco ala Carte, by the Junior League of SFO. I took it as an excellent sign that this book had several Post-It ™ notes marking recipes that looked particularly good...that indicated that the previous owner and I had similar tastes. (On the other hand, since the precious owner got rid of the book, maybe it wasn't such a good sign! :raz: ) I was going to make the eggplant soup tonight, and ran out of time. Soon, soon.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Kitchen Confidential is in the bathroom (I wash my hands before AND after reading).

That's too much..... :laugh:


Frau Farbissma: "It's a television commercial! With this cartoon leprechaun! And all of these children are trying to chase him...Hey leprechaun! Leprechaun! We want to get your lucky charms! Haha! Oh, and there's all these little tiny bits of marshmallow just stuck right in the cereal so that when the kids eat them, they think, 'Oh this is candy! I'm having fun!'"

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Got around to counting the books at the cottage. Add 115 for me.

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Sad story - my collection of about 200 cookbooks was lost in my recent house fire. Except for the cookbooks I have bought while living abroad and church and community group books, many of these books can hopefully be replaced. However, I have been unable to find a copy of a book on grilling that I used frequently. I believe that title was "The Grill Book" and the author's last name was Horn. It was a thin book with sections specific to marinades, various meats, vegetables, etc. There were also several pages of full menus. If anyone has an idea where I can find this, please let me know.

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Sad story - my collection of about 200 cookbooks was lost in my recent house fire.  Except for the cookbooks I have bought while living abroad and church and community group books, many of these books can hopefully be replaced.  However, I have been unable to find a copy of a book on grilling that I used frequently.  I believe that title was "The Grill Book" and the author's last name was Horn.  It was a thin book with sections specific to marinades, various meats, vegetables, etc.  There were also several pages of full menus.  If anyone has an idea where I can find this, please let me know.

I tried doing a Google search for the book and found only this reference (click here) of a recipe from the cookbook. It looks like the author's name is Ken Horn. He has also written a Chinese cookbook (assuming it's the same author).

My online searches through the many online used bookstores also came up empty.

Don't give up hope...it may resurface, yet.


“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

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Sad story - my collection of about 200 cookbooks was lost in my recent house fire.  Except for the cookbooks I have bought while living abroad and church and community group books, many of these books can hopefully be replaced.  However, I have been unable to find a copy of a book on grilling that I used frequently.  I believe that title was "The Grill Book" and the author's last name was Horn.  It was a thin book with sections specific to marinades, various meats, vegetables, etc.  There were also several pages of full menus.  If anyone has an idea where I can find this, please let me know.

:shock: You have my deepest sympathy!I lost a collection of about 300 in a house fire last August, and the wonderful people here rallied 'round and helped me rebuild my collection. I'm back up to about 40, and always keep my eyes open for "goodies", so I'll keep this one in mind in case it falls into my lap, so to speak... :cool:


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Good news - I found the book - it is called The Grill Book, but was written by David Barich and Kelly McCune. The name I remembered was Hom, not Horn, and he had written the introduction only.

I bought 2 cookbooks today and am on my way to rebuilding my collection. I am focusing now on how best to display my books as I design my new kitchen!

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Made an exciting find (for me) yesterday...

I had taken Linda Dannenberg's Paris Boulangerie Patisserie: Recipes from Thirteen Outstanding French Bakeries out of the library quite a few times. It was originally released in the early 90's and was out of print. The cheapest copy on Amazon was over $100.

Well, I was in a bookstore yesterday (in the SF Ferry Bldg) and saw a copy! It was only $12.00 (hard cover, beautiful photos of almost all the pastries, etc). So I snatched it up and was gleeful with my "find".

Still very happy with getting the book, but I looked on Amazon today and in that way figured out that it has been recently (Mar 2005) republished with another publisher (Gramercy Books). The new release looks just like the old one. So, if you've been wanting this book you have another chance!


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Get Saucy by Grace Parisi - i enjoy her recipes in F&W magazines and this is a great book to be read cover to cover: recipes broken into groups - sauces, marinades, glazes, pestos etc with a short overview for each group, and then each recipe with the commentary on how to/why.

Tsukemono-Japanese Pickling Recipes - a small book but i'm so ready to try all 73 recipes in this book.

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Got back to the thrift store, and picked up the five remaining Time-Life books: Italy, Middle East, Caribbean, Latin America, and China. My total expenditure for the seven volumes? $14 Canadian.


Fat=flavor

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500+ here. I'm not sure of the exact count since I just weeded out the bookcases. Got rid of some really bad ones. There's a reason "Forgotten Foods" were forgotten.:D

Where did I get all those microwave books?

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500+ here. I'm not sure of the exact count since I just weeded out the bookcases. Got rid of some really bad ones. There's a reason "Forgotten Foods" were forgotten.:D

Where did I get all those microwave books?

More to the point...why?

(ducks and runs) :laugh:


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Scored really big yesterday at a book sale to support literacy: Chez Panisse Fruit and The Handmade Loaf by Dan Lepard. Both were in mint condition and were $2 each. Bought many more but will probably treat them like magazines - read them and then discard. At $2 a pop, they are way cheaper than magazines!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Kind of an odd one...I downloaded Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management from Project Gutenberg. It's not just a cookbook, there's a lot about dealing with servants and suchlike (a big part of my day, for sure....) but there are a ton of vintage recipes. I was amused to note that she even costed them out!

For those who aren't familiar with it, this is one of the great Victorian best-sellers. Isabel Beeton wrote it when she was 22, and she died at 29 or thereabouts, but the book continued to sell in a great many editions through the second half of the nineteenth century.

FWIW, Project Gutenburg also has a church cookbook from 1894 available for download. I might go back for that.


Fat=flavor

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2 more for me:

Indian Essence by Atul Kochar, and one from Kerala that a friend brought back from India for me.

Cheers,

Geoff Ruby

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Scored really big yesterday at a book sale to support literacy:  Chez Panisse Fruit and The Handmade Loaf by Dan Lepard. 

I read this fast and thought it said, "The Handmade Loaf by Def Leppard." Hair-metal bakers: who knew?

Must be Friday. It is, right?


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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30 books + 100 maps full with different magazines :)

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