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Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 2)


JAZ
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On the subject of out-of-print (for which there is another thread somewhere nearby): Jessica's Biscuit has their own line of "Biscuit Books" -- reprints of worthy books. Perhaps they might be prevailed upon? It probably depends at least in part on who owns the copyright, and on where the production plates are.

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Classical Southern Cooking is wonderful; unfortunately it is out of print and not to easy to get... I think there is one copy on Amazon for ~$100.  I don't know why they never released again or in paperback; always gets great reviews...  Good Luck!

Aaargh! I'm always the one with champagne tastes on a beer budget. Still, I'll keep my eye out for it. Might make a perfect holiday gift for... me!

I just located a copy in our district library system. I'll be a good, honest library patron, citizen, and human being and not "lose" it. :biggrin:

It arrived the other day. I love this book. I learn something new from nearly every page; his annotations often are more instructive than the recipe itself. He writes with authority, clarity, humor, and a Southern sensibility. ("If you want to be trendy, you can call your grits, as some demented individuals are now doing, Southern polenta, but I'd really rather not know about it." "...Charleston and Savannah...are so distinct from one another that they might as well be in different countries....Savannah, with its distinctly English plan, architecture, and sensibilities, has little of Charleston's West Indian flair.") I'm also amazed that it went out of print and that it hasn't been reissued in paperback.

My having chosen that quote yesterday about Charleston and Savannah has become more than a little disconcerting, as this arrived in my "PBS Previews" e-mail today:

Sophisticated Ladies: Charleston and Savannah With Blythe Danner

Georgia Public Television

This Georgia Public Television Web site explores the South of the past and of the present through two of the South's most intriguing cities -- Charleston and Savannah. Award-winning stage and screen actress Blythe Danner hosts the tour of these cities and the cultures that make them unique.

Info about the show here.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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I paid a visit to Strand today. Looked at all the cookbooks, and came home empty-handed. I figure with Chanukah starting next week I should wait and see what Blovie suprises me with.

For those of you who shop at Stand @ 12th st - they've re-organized the cookbook shelves. It's actually easier to browse now.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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43, and a number of overstuffed spiral binders with copied recipes and notes.

Guess that makes me a Junior Member. :rolleyes:

Don't worry you'll catch up with the rest of us in no time! :biggrin:

Welcome to egullet and the cookbook thread!

Add one more for me.......

ajia no choumiryou de itsumo no gohan by Watanabe Yuko

A Japanese cookbook about cooking with "Asian" seasonings

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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One more for me. Inspired by Kristin: Donna Hay's Off The Shelf: Cooking from the pantry, since I will be doing a lot of this kind of cooking in the future. It's gorgeous and so far I want to make everything in it. :smile:

:biggrin::biggrin:

It is really a great book, you won't be disappointed!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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One more for me.  Inspired by Kristin: Donna Hay's Off The Shelf: Cooking from the pantry, since I will be doing a lot of this kind of cooking in the future.  It's gorgeous and so far I want to make everything in it.  :smile:

:biggrin::biggrin:

It is really a great book, you won't be disappointed!

I have all of her books and they are all fantastic, my favourite series!!!! Have you seen her magazine? Just as beautiful as the books.

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54,257. And welcome, Holly.

To your question, ludja, Southern Cuisine is neglegted in my collection, actually. I have Edna Lewis's "Taste of Country Cooking," amd "Pursuit of Flavor" the "Southern Cooking" volume of the Time-Life American series (a terrific book, ) and Joyce White's "Brown Sugar." Thassit. Where do I start? "Charleston Reciepts?"

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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my next cookbook purchase will be Alton's Brown's Gear for your kitchen

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/158...6485726-9586333

looks like fun.

i just got "the Essential Kitchen"by Gates McFadden.

granted it isn't the best cookbook out there but gosh are the pictures pretty

Do not expect INTJs to actually care about how you view them. They already know that they are arrogant bastards with a morbid sense of humor. Telling them the obvious accomplishes nothing.

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Glad you liked it. "Jenny" is so many, many people! :biggrin:

I finally made a decision about buying chefs' cookbooks: I will wait until I can find them on the remainders tables, VERY deeply discounted. I'm only buying them to read, not really to cook from, so it doesn't matter how long I have to wait.

you see: you make a living cooking food, i make mine writing about food.

we have different priorities :)

you buy it as a guide, i get it to gain an inside scoop of the people i write about.

Do not expect INTJs to actually care about how you view them. They already know that they are arrogant bastards with a morbid sense of humor. Telling them the obvious accomplishes nothing.

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Hi,

I'm a newbie and am fascinated by this thread. I currently own about 50 cookbooks. Does anyone have a preference of what kind of cookbooks they like to have? I'm a big fan of cookbooks with pictures so I can see how the actual end product is supposed to look like. Though I do have the Silver Palate and a few others which have no pictures so the "pictures a MUST" isn't a strict rule with me. :smile:

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54, 307. And I'm looking forward to a big bump on this thresd at the gigt-giving holidays approach.

Welcome, bisou (love your alias.) I guess that the quality of a cookbook boils down to the quality of the recipes, but: I love lots of beautiful, glossy, drool- inducing photos. It wouldn't sell me the book, necessarily, but it enhances the experience.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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One more for me.  Inspired by Kristin: Donna Hay's Off The Shelf: Cooking from the pantry, since I will be doing a lot of this kind of cooking in the future.  It's gorgeous and so far I want to make everything in it.   :smile:

:biggrin::biggrin:

It is really a great book, you won't be disappointed!

I have all of her books and they are all fantastic, my favourite series!!!! Have you seen her magazine? Just as beautiful as the books.

Yeah -- Donna Hay is what Sandra Lee would try to be if she had a brain. Oooh, am I being too harsh? :raz:

That is to say, I very much like Off the Shelf, for the recipes, the philosophy, and the production values. Doesn't Donna Hay have a new one out recently?

Bisou: I agree with you 100% on pictures. So very helpful!

AzRaeL: no, actually, now I edit books, mostly cookbooks. So if I can't get it free because I worked on it, I'll wait until it's remaindered. (Editing may pay better than being a line cook, but it still isn't much. :raz: )

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Counted 80 cookbooks, if we get to count books on wine.

Now, you understand don't you see that, uh, I'm not proud of all of these books.

Beyond just the number of books, what about the distribution of times of the day when people were posting their responses to this thread? Answer below.

01 AM 08|XXXXXXXXX

02 AM 02|XX

03 AM 04|XXXX

04 AM 07|XXXXXXXX

05 AM 10|XXXXXXXXXXX

06 AM 03|XXX

07 AM 33|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

08 AM 30|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

09 AM 43|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

10 AM 37|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

11 AM 54|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

12 AM 09|XXXXXXXXXX

01 PM 47|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

02 PM 37|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

03 PM 43|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

04 PM 55|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

05 PM 39|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

06 PM 34|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

07 PM 55|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

08 PM 34|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

09 PM 29|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

10 PM 33|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

11 PM 19|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

12 PM 49|XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

So, it looks like posting conflicts with eating, and breakfast is 6 AM, lunch at noon, supper 5-6 PM, and late snack at 11 PM.

What would be the right food and wine to go with

R. Strauss's 'Ein Heldenleben'?

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i just got "the Essential Kitchen"by Gates McFadden.

granted it isn't the best cookbook out there but gosh are the pictures pretty

Not to be a total geek or anything, but wasn't she Dr Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation?

Yes...and mother of young Wesley :biggrin:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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54,257. And welcome, Holly.

To your question, ludja, Southern Cuisine is neglegted in my collection, actually. I have Edna Lewis's "Taste of Country Cooking," amd "Pursuit of Flavor" the "Southern Cooking" volume of the Time-Life American series (a terrific book, ) and Joyce White's "Brown Sugar." Thassit. Where do I start? "Charleston Reciepts?"

How about Bill Neal's books: Bill Neal's Southern Cooking and Biscuits, Spoonbread, and Sweet Potato Pie?

For next year's Heartland Gathering I'll check out Classical Southern Cooking from the library for you to enjoy over the weekend. (That is, if neither of us has gotten it by then. At $100 for a used copy I kind of doubt that will happen. :sad: )

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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i just got "the Essential Kitchen"by Gates McFadden.

granted it isn't the best cookbook out there but gosh are the pictures pretty

Not to be a total geek or anything, but wasn't she Dr Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation?

Yes...and mother of young Wesley :biggrin:

=R=

I guess I should be embarrassed that I knew that. :rolleyes:

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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54,257.  And welcome, Holly.

To your question, ludja, Southern Cuisine is neglegted in my collection, actually.  I have Edna Lewis's "Taste of Country Cooking,"  amd "Pursuit of Flavor" the "Southern Cooking" volume of the Time-Life American series (a terrific book, ) and Joyce White's "Brown Sugar."  Thassit.  Where do I start?  "Charleston Reciepts?"

I actually don't have many yet (that I would wholeheartedly recommend for a place in people's libraries)--beside Fowler's Classical Southern Cooking and Bill Neal's Books. Although another nice one is: 'Butter Beans to Blackberries, Recipes from the Southern Garden" by Ronni Lundy. I haven't tried to get copies of any of the older principal sources, like Charleston Receipts...

Others:

The Flavor of the South by Jeanne Voltz.

This one has 'non-fancy' basic Southern dishes; fun to read and I've had luck with what I've tried.

Mama Dip's Kitchen by Mildred Council

Always loved eating at the old 'Dips' in Chapel Hill; enjoyed it a little less in their newer, bigger place across the street..recently got this as a gift and haven't tried much out yet

Florida Cookbook: From Gulf Coast Gumbo to Key Lime Pie by Jeanne Voltz and Caroline Stuart

This is a neat book with lots of interesting regional recipes, broken down into seven regions.

The New Southern Cook by John Martin Taylor

I'm not as fond of this book but I think that is at least partly b/c I am less interested in 'new-fangled' recipes; or maybe it is just the recipes in this book. I think Taylor's book, 'Hoppin John's Lowcountry is well respected but I'm not personally familiar with it.

thanks for the mention of the Time-Life book; and I need to look at Edna Lewis' books more to see which would fit in best.

edited to catch at least a few typos...

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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My count is 37, most of them accumulated over the past 12 months.

Recent acquisitions,which I couldn't resist at 75% off at my local bookstore are : Jamie's Kitchen (Jamie Oliver), New Wave Asian (Sri Owen), Vatch's Thai Street Food (Vatcharin Bhumichitr), The minimalist cooks at home (Mark Bittman) and A Cook's Guide to Grains (Jenni Muir).

Speaking of Donnay Hay,I recently bought her Modern Classics 2 as a Christmas present,proving the rule of buying for other people what you not-so-secretly want yourself. It looks very scrumptious. I've also ordered back issues of her magazine and would recommend it.

Edited by hildi (log)
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I too have Donna Hay's cookbooks, Modern Classics I and Off The Shelf...wonderful cookbooks with gorgeous pictures...I've done several recipes and the end result was always excellent. I highly recommend these cookbooks.

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Three more!

The Roasted Vegetable, by Andrea Chesman

Good stuff. Testimonials on the dust jacket from Charlie Trotter, James Peterson, Nora Pouillon, and others. One surprise though -- not one Brussels sprouts recipe.

The Frog/Commisary Cookbook

I am so happy that this was reprinted. Eclectic, solid recipes. The best veggie burger ever.

Jeques Pépin's Complete Techniques

$6.99 on the remainder shelf!!! I still have the original hardcover La Technique, but this one-volume paperback combination of La Technique and La Methode may actually fit in my cookbook bookcase.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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