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Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 5)


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  • 2 weeks later...

My last count was 1946 actual cookbooks, plus 43 related {such as Trotter's Lessons in Excellence & various (auto)biographies}. This inventory was taken in August, 2012, after donating 432 cookbooks.

In 1987, preparatory to going cruising for a couple of years, and then living on the boat, I donated over a thousand to a resale shop, along with almost 4 thousand other books.

Last August, I said I'd buy no more hard cover or paperback books. Everything would have to be Kindle, or other e-book, because my deteriorating health & weakness make it almost impossible to hold the paper ones.

Since then I've added 127 cookbooks to my iPad. That's a good thing. O:-)

But I've also purchased 17 hard covers that aren't available in e-book...right now, I'm awaiting delivery of Martha Stewart's Hors D'Oeuvres. Wednesday, M. F. K. Fisher's The aArt of Eating: 50th Anniversary Edition was delivered. Last week, Trotters Seafood, and the week before, McLagan's Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient, with Recipes.

I dare not go on...I'm frightening myself!

ETA: A few of those 127 on the iPad are duplicates of faves I already had & used a lot.

Edited by furzzy (log)
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I added 18 last month after browsing through various online bookstores.

I have a question for those with too many cookbooks - how do you keep track of which book has recipes that you like to do again? I used to jot down in a (paper) notebook recipes from books that I have tried that I like to add to my Can-Do-Again list, but am finding that it's easier to record it in my laptop for easier search and retrieval purposes. I'm interested to learn how others do it so that I can perhaps learn a better way.

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I only have like one meter of cookbooks. It's more than I need, since I only actively use three or four of them, and only when I on rare occasions bake cakes. I don't use recipes for any other cooking. I have read them all though, and tons more I have borrowed from the library, since I read them more or less like novels.

Edited by Mofassah (log)
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Over 500... Give or take (maybe around 750? I need to count!). Perhaps I should be ashamed, but I am not!
I organize them by obvious theme; asian, pastry, candy making, sauces, barbecue etc... I find myself needing to get creative with some of the categories, such as "chefs who deserve to be famous" and "chefs who don't deserve [it as much] to be famous". The collection is steadily growing and some of the favorites that stand out at this moment are a very complete selection of Keller's books, Modernist Cuisine at Home, and more. I make sure to pick up local books from anywhere I travel to, with everything from Medeival cooking of Scotland (no, I have not made anything from this cookbook) to Viennese specialties, Lemon themed cookbooks from the Amalfi coast, and even Ancient Peruvian. I dream of having a library room one day, and at this rate... :blush:

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Oh and I should probably mention when I was moving I made sure to have an extra bedroom I could have enough room in for my existing book case and a badly needed new one to add to it...

Over 500... Give or take (maybe around 750? I need to count!). Perhaps I should be ashamed, but I am not!
I organize them by obvious theme; asian, pastry, candy making, sauces, barbecue etc... I find myself needing to get creative with some of the categories, such as "chefs who deserve to be famous" and "chefs who don't deserve [it as much] to be famous". The collection is steadily growing and some of the favorites that stand out at this moment are a very complete selection of Keller's books, Modernist Cuisine at Home, and more. I make sure to pick up local books from anywhere I travel to, with everything from Medeival cooking of Scotland (no, I have not made anything from this cookbook) to Viennese specialties, Lemon themed cookbooks from the Amalfi coast, and even Ancient Peruvian. I dream of having a library room one day, and at this rate... :blush:

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I've gotta say, I 've had a LOT more, and occasionally fewer, but right now, I 've only got about 5 cookbooks to my name. BUT, I did just order a new one from Amazon, a reprint of Clementine Paddleford's collection of regional recipes. I don't cook much anymore, but I certainly enjoy reading these books!

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I received "Heston Blumenthal at home" last week, and I love it. Not much in there that's new to me though, since I have seen all his TV-programs and read all there is to read about his cooking on the internet and like a gazillion of references to his work, but I still love it. He is not just a brilliant chef, he is also a pretty decent writer. And after a decade or two with extreme focus on photage, it's really nice to have a cookbook that is actually a good READ too, not just mouthwatering pictures of food that never looks like it does when I cook it at home anyway.

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LTWong wrote

I have a question for those with too many cookbooks - how do you keep track of which book has recipes that you like to do again? I used to jot down in a (paper) notebook recipes from books that I have tried that I like to add to my Can-Do-Again list, but am finding that it's easier to record it in my laptop for easier search and retrieval purposes. I'm interested to learn how others do it so that I can perhaps learn a better way.

How I have managed this is to create a database using MS Access.

In this database I list

Recipe name

Cookbook name

Page

Location of cookbook (such as Loungeroom 1 / Shelf from bottom )

Category of recipe (such as Casserole, Slow Cooker etc )

Notes ( When I have made this particular recipe )

It was very easy to make the database using MS Access. I can search the database to show say all Chicken Casseroles , Beef slow cooked etc

Neil

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LTWong wrote

I have a question for those with too many cookbooks - how do you keep track of which book has recipes that you like to do again? I used to jot down in a (paper) notebook recipes from books that I have tried that I like to add to my Can-Do-Again list, but am finding that it's easier to record it in my laptop for easier search and retrieval purposes. I'm interested to learn how others do it so that I can perhaps learn a better way.

How I have managed this is to create a database using MS Access.

In this database I list

Recipe name

Cookbook name

Page

Location of cookbook (such as Loungeroom 1 / Shelf from bottom )

Category of recipe (such as Casserole, Slow Cooker etc )

Notes ( When I have made this particular recipe )

It was very easy to make the database using MS Access. I can search the database to show say all Chicken Casseroles , Beef slow cooked etc

Neil

Silkhat - you may want to jump over to this topic http://www.eatyourbooks.com/
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I received "Heston Blumenthal at home" last week, and I love it.

I recently made the lemon tart from that book, it came out so well (for a hack like me).

I did the roasted chicken last weekend, but I did it in a combo with how he describes in the book and the way he did it in his TV show, which is much the same only with brine, and even lower and slower, I roasted mine for 8 hours, and it is by far the best chicken I've made ... or eaten even. It was worth the pirce of the book itself, and I can't wait to try the other recipes. Will try the lemon tart this weekend.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Frogprincesse,

How's the Drunken Botanist and the Cocktail Lab?

They're in my "Future Purchase" category.

Hi LT,

I recommend both books. The Drunken Botanist is a well-researched and well-written book that is very pleasant to read. Buy it if you are interested about botany and the history of plants used to make alcoholic beverages. If you are mostly interested in cocktail recipes, the book only contains a few.

The Cocktail Lab has a lot of recipes, some that are easily achievable at home, and some that require equipment that most people don't have access to (centrifuge, rotavap, etc). But unlike most cocktail books which are a collection of recipes, this one describes the ideas behind these drinks and the creative process, and that makes it a fascinating (and inspiring) read.

Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

I have to stop buying books.

In the Kitchen with Alain Passard, Christophe Blain

The A.O.C Cookbook, Suzanne Goin

The Curious Bartender, Tristan Stephenson

The Art of the Shim, Dinah Sanders

And, a little late, Lucky Peach Issue 8 - The Gender Issue

10847252914_2135c70977_z.jpg

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And I recently invested in two Paula Deen cookbooks: "The Lady & Sons, Savannah Country Cookbook"; and, "The Lady & Sons, Too."

Previously had none. But with all of the publicity, especially those decrying her horrible and fattening recipes, like Sweet Potato Pie, Baked Tomato Casserole, Charcoal-grilled Vidalia Onions, Squash & Corn Casserole, Roast Pork with Plum Sauce...

Well, I couldn't resist!

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I received The Southern Cooking Bible by Paula Deen, a Clementine Paddleford volume (of which I think little) and a dozen community cookbooks, all but 1 of which have good things to offer, so that's 12 new ones for me and 2 for the library when I get there! I'm at it again... %)

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"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I received The Southern Cooking Bible by Paula Deen, a Clementine Paddleford volume (of which I think little) and a dozen community cookbooks, all but 1 of which have good things to offer, so that's 12 new ones for me and 2 for the library when I get there! I'm at it again... %)

I'll be very curious to see what you think of "The Southern Cooking Bible." Certainly a great name.

Do you think I need it? I'm definitely a parishioner of the Church of Southern Cooking, soulful and saved and washed in the Bourbon. Halleluiah, y'all!

Do I need the Bible?

And, "at it again"... At what?

Edited by Jaymes (log)
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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I am 5 books away from completing my 39 book set of ALL the Time Life Good Cook series I even have the thin paperback Well Equipped Kitchen "accessory' book.

Then I can complete my Betty Crocker spirals and the TL World series and TL Healthy Home Cooking and Weeks Worth Of Menus series

Im still bitter that Koenemann Publishers never completed their Culinaria series...

BTW does anyone know anything about this series?

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0848706110/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=3622DJ1BPEFWG&coliid=I2I4KIKITPNDYY

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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If "cookbooks" includes all food related books with recipes I have in the neighborhood of 3,500....give or take a couple hundred.

I don't have many newer books like most folks in this thread (I buy maybe 15-20 new cookbooks per year), most of mine are older, some very old.

I inherited about 300 cookbooks from my grandmother when she passed 7 years ago.

About 2000 of the books are digitized....I've added many out-of-print/out-of-copyright cookbooks to my digital collection in the past couple years since I built a DIY book scanner.

Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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