• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

maggiethecat

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 5)

310 posts in this topic

A personal retrospect.

Just went backwards through the posts I have made to this topic. Can't believe it. I came to this list with 126 cookbooks to my name. A very mixed lot. And that was from a background of hating to cook.

Since Dec 08, via one method or other, I have acquired an additional 91 cookbooks. That's 3 years of incredible cooking and learning from this list. Possibly one of the most amazing and unexpected turns my life has taken.

I now am proud/ashamed/embarrassed to say I own 217 cookbooks.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Add a few more to the list:

Local ones

Gingerboy - Teage Ezard

MoVida Cocina - Frank Camorra

Some others

Joy of Mixology - Gary Regan

Nobu's Vegetarian Cookbook - Nobu Matsuhisa

Serious Barbecue - Adam Perry Lang

And a couple I bought in South Africa

32 Inspirational Chefs -- South Africa, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Mauritius & The Seychelles - various

Reuben Cooks Local -- Reuben Riffel


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel so much better after going through this topic. Was feeling guilty after having ordered 30 more to add to my (measly in comparison) 200+ book collection. Looks like I can buy some more now.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more: The Splendid Table's How to Eat Weekends


Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and their readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

 

The mosque is too far from home, so let's do this / Let's make a weeping child laugh. -Nida Fazli, poet (translated, from the Urdu, by Anu Garg, wordsmith.org)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since November I only got two new books:

  • Cooking By Hand by Paul Bertolli (I made the tesa and the ragù alla bolognese so far, both terrific)
  • The PDT Cocktail Book by Jim Meehan and Chris Gall, which is getting plenty of use as seen on the PDT thread!

I have gotten maybe 6 since Christmas--and my new PDT just arrived today, inspired by that thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One nice thing about buying books in a used bookstore (other than supporting local stores) is that sometimes you have a nice surprise. The Hawaiian cookbook had been signed by a couple of the chefs. Now I just need to gather the other 10 signatures to complete the collection. :smile:

I also just got White Heat by Marco Pierre White, thinking it was his autobiography. It was the wrong book but now I am fascinated with the recipes...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought "Cookin With Coolio" used off of Amazon...

It's Whickety Whack...

Measurements in "dime bags"


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got Charleston Receipts Repeats. Charleston Receipts has been a favorite cookbook of mine for fifty years. This one was first published in 1986 and is now in its 11th printing.

I got this one on the recommendation of a friend who assured me that it was not a rehash of the "receipts" in the original book but new ones and some modernized ones from the earlier book with ingredients now available in "modern" measurements.

A couple of weeks ago I got and am now reading Cheese and Culture - A History of Cheese and Its Place in Western Civilization, by Paul S. Kindstedt.

I've read almost halfway through it and while some of it is heavy going, it is fascinating. Cheese was not merely food. It had religious significance in many cultures and had a distinct effect on the spread of civilization, allowing people who were lactose intolerant (yes, even back then) to derive nutrition from milk in its secondary form, cheese.

This is not a book for someone who wants a quick read but if you are interested in how and why cheese (generic) and the various regional cheeses were developed and contributed to trade and the enrichment of societies, this is an excellent book.

"Cheese and Culture tells the story of how cheese history intersects with some of the pivotal periods in human history and in many cases shaped the lives of cheesemakers and the diverse cheeses they developed."


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally got around to counting mine, which are mostly older cookbooks that I read like novels. The total is -- give or take a few -- about 1450. The thing that I find odd, or maybe sad, is I cook from about 5 or 6 of them. My latest acquisitions have been older (last 60 years or so) Canadian cookbooks as I explore our new home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've really cut down on buying cookbooks. No, really, I have.

Still I bought one recently, second-hand, Bakers Best Chocolate Cookbook, 1995.

Why you ask? Well, for reasons which don't make sense, I have amassed a large collection of 'those' kinds of chocolate books from Nestle, Hershey, etc. For fun I guess. :raz:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I now have Modernist Cuisine (actually, was given this ten days ago, but was too stunned until now to think of mentioning it here). I'm amazed by how big the volumes are, never expected them to be this imposing. Brilliant. :smile: :smile: :smile:


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own 49 baking books and 30 cooking books. I have several baking books on my wish list.

I usually to go to the library and try the recipes before I actually buy the book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

385 for me, although I have started borrowing more from the library.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

38, and I'm trying to pare down my collection more.

I'm a bit obsessive about getting rid of anything I don't use and trying to stay more or less mobile (I love moving), so I am often donating books to the library or passing them on to friends. I get rid of cookbooks which are stunning or gorgeous, but impractical for me, and I often get rid of cookbooks in favor of replacing them with something more advanced. I have a good stack of food magazines, but I also go through them and rip out the pages I want, and toss the rest. I do have a box of xeroxed recipes from library cookbooks. I, too, am that crazy lady always picking up 15 cookbooks at the library.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By boilsover
      The 2017 iteration of the International Home & Housewares Show is being held March 18-21 at McCormick Place in Chicago.  This is the world's 2nd-largest tradeshow for the cookware and housewares industry, close behind Ambiente in Frankfurt.  It is a cornucopia of what's new and what's coming down the pike in the world of cookware, and if you've ever wondered about why makers do the things they do, this is your opportunity to talk with execs and their product development people (e.g., you can discuss ceramics with the 6th-gen owner of Emile Henry).  It takes an able cookware geek a full two days to cover all the booths.
       
      Are any eGulls or eGuys besides me attending? 
    • By Paul Fink
      This unfortunately titled book changed my life. I always enjoyed cooking and idealized Julia Child &
      Jacque Pepin. But I was a typical home cook. I would see a recipe and try to duplicate it little understanding about what I was doing.
       
      Cooking the Nouvelle Cuisine in America talked about a philosophy of cooking. It showed me that there is more depth to cooking. A history. A philosophy.
      The recipes are very approachable and you can make them on a budget from grocery store ingredients. I read it as a grad student in Oregon, in the late 80's I had access to lots of fresh ingredients. And some very nice wines, cheap! I was suppose to be studying physics but I end up learning more about wine & cooking.
    • By Smokeydoke
      Here is the discussion thread.
      Here is the Amazon link.
      My first recipe was Mushroom Mapo Tofu p. 132  I was blown away by how good this tasted. Very spicy! Very authentic. I didn't miss the meat at all. I told Mr. Smokey I'd add ground pork next time and he said it didn't need it. Mr. Smokey refused pork? Ha!
      Definitely a keeper and maybe a regular rotation spot.
      If I had anything negative to say, it would be the dish wasn't very filling. The recipe is suppose to serve four but the two of us finished it off, no problem, and Mister wasn't full afterwards. A soup, or an appetizer could be paired with the dish to make a heartier meal.
      Note: I did receive a complimentary copy of the book to review, but all opinions of the book and recipes are mine.


    • By chromedome
      I'm posting it here on the grounds that national Food Guides are, by their nature, intended to be used as references. 
       
      Many of you will have read today's news stories about the proposed changes to Canada's food guidelines. All of the stories I read mentioned that Health Canada was soliciting input from the general public, as well as health/food industry professionals. None of them, alas, actually gave a link to the "consultation" page at Health Canada's website. For those who wish to weigh in, here it is:
       
      http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/health-system-systeme-sante/consultations/foodguide-guidealimentaire/index-eng.php
    • By JoNorvelleWalker
      Started in on Rob's book tonight.  Nice pictures, interesting philosophy.  The bit about grapevines reminded me ever so much about my balcony.  My grapevine has been growing ten or twenty years, planted by the birds.  Never a grape, ever.  Only recently did I learn that unlike European grapes, the native grapevines are sexual.  This one is undoubtedly a boy.  He provides lovely leaves and shade, and something for the tomatoes to hang onto.
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.