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maggiethecat

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 5)

335 posts in this topic

165, 124. That's a lotta cookbooks, but I know it's nowhere near the true figure. C'mon, guys. Fess up.

[Moderator note: The original Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? topic became too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it up; the preceding part of this discussion is here: Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 4)]


Edited by Mjx Moderator note added. (log)

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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ok, the total of distinct Asian cookbooks cataloged so far is 686...does not include duplicates...listed at

http://dmreed.com/food-cooking-asian-cookbooks.htm

non-Asian cookbooks are next to be cataloged.


Edited by dmreed (log)

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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Add three more for me, and 2 "about food" Holly Moore's Best Food Writing 2008 and (preorder) Best Food Writing 2009. What can I say, I love this guy! (his collections of writing, any way... :laugh: )

Well, having to correct an extreme attack of the dumba$$ without the "edit" button ( I waited too long...) Let me correct myself. Those collectiontions are compiled by Holly Hughes, and SHE's a woman, but I still love those books! :wub:


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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On the ReaderWare thing, I use Collectorz - does the same thing, a bit cheaper too. I use it for my vinyl LPs, CDs and, of course, cook books...http://www.collectorz.com/book/

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I don't think Collectorz was available when I first bought ReaderWare. It looks like Collectorz might be more expensive if you buy the programs for books, audio and video. ReaderWare has one price and includes the 3 programs. How is support for Collectorz? ReaderWare has fantastic support...I have not had any problems but I have had suggestions and questions regarding functionality and the responses have been almost instant!


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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I've never needed support so can't comment I'm afraid. Agree, you have to buy a different version for each collection type, which is a bit of a money spinner I guess, but you can get it for free through Trial Pay (needed some new ink for my printer so bought a cartridge and got Collectorz for Books for free). Readerware does look good though, I may download the trial and see how it differs...

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My newest (not even here yet) is "Second Helpings from Union Square Cafe..." which I bought for ONE recipe: Carmen Quagliata's ricotta gnocchi--one of the most heavenly dishes I've had the pleasure of ingesting. I've tried several recipes since that fateful meal, but failed miserably in recreating the texture and taste of Carmen's version. My fond hope is that the book's recipe is HIS.

AND just so my restaurant friends don't get their tocques in a twist, I still regularly eat out...I'm not searching out favorite recipes to cut back on my entertainment budget. I'll see Carmen and the gang--and eat his gnocchi--again soon.


Carlo A. Balistrieri

The Gardens at Turtle Point

Tuxedo Park, NY

BotanicalGardening.com and its BG Blog

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I have 120 cookbooks at a quick estimate. Who knew? I am glad I never counted before. I was already feeling like I had no excuses to purchase anymore cookbooks. Why am I always looking for recipes online? That must stop. But I am a chronic researcher and tend to investigate any new recipe or method so I need all those cookbooks (and the internet).

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Well, at last count 837 but I have a few on order.


“I cook with wine, sometimes I even add it to the food.”

W.C. Fields

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my current counts are 691 Asian cookbooks and 278 no-Asian cookbooks (but I just found more non-Asian on several shelves which I have not yet cataloged).


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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One more for me: Classic Vegetarian Cooking from the Middle East & North Africa. Habeeb Salloum.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I have about 200. Each of those has at least one recipe thats made me go 'wow, I need to make that'. I justify my purchases by thinking "it's something that won't go off." :) My favourite cookbook is 'The Red Lantern' by Pauline Nguyen. It has recipes from an Australian Vietnamese restaurant. It's the first book I've come across, after many years of searching, that has an authentic(and extremely tasty) Bun Bo Hue recipe. Thats the dish that I use to determine if a Vietnamese restaurant is worth visiting again. Pauline's book is also the first cook book to give enough information for me to make restaurant quality food.

Edited: For clarity and speeelingk.


Edited by Snorlax (log)

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Scratch two not-very-useful cookbooks for me. Thank you.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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252 - I feel so much better now that I know my cookbook obsession is not nearly as over the top as some!


Abigail Blake

Sugar Apple: Posts from the Caribbean

http://www.abigailblake.com/sugarapple

"Sometimes spaghetti likes to be alone." Big Night

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One more at a favorite 2nd hand store, St. V de P. Mark Bittman;s The Minimalist Entertains. Got to love those thrift stores. All those great books for next to nothing. :wub:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I guess I'm a light-weight with just fifty. The first fifty of many more, I should hope. (If I hadn't been unemployed for the last year and counting, I bet it'd be a lot higher. The wish list keeps growing...)

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92... but we culled over 100 others before moving last year, so I'm not sure that's really an accurate picture. About 30 of those get used at least once every few months. I also have another 15 or so cocktail books -- are we counting those?


John Rosevear

"Brown food tastes better." - Chris Schlesinger

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I have around 150 and still look through the church group cookbooks at the yard sales for more. Lately I have been going for bread books as I recently started making my own bread again for the first time since I was a kid and that is a LONG time ago.

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Problem is that I love to read the books of cuisine I know nothing about and that leads to my buying more pots and pans (think tagine, wok, paella pan, etc) which leads to my reading more of that cuisine which leads to more cookbooks which leads to more pots and pans and other equipment which leads to my being broke.

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The New Whole Grains Cookbook by Robin Asbell arrived in a box from Amazon yesterday.

I have purchased several new cookbooks this year but can't recall all of them right now.

I did buy Ratio, by Michael Ruhlman but got it for my Kindle. I have several cookbooks in the Kindle, including some that I have in regular format but wanted to be able to take them with me without hauling a bunch of extra weight so this system is ideal for me.

I have really enjoyed reading through Ratio. It is especially interesting to learn exactly how and why something happens with a particular cooking process.

I have McGee's books but this book condenses the information into an easily understood and succinct format.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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